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Joseph White

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NEWS
June 19, 1994 | BRAD BONHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his townhouse a few miles from UC Irvine, Joseph White puts on a string quartet CD and begins to sift through mounds of material on a large, square coffee table. Classical music is his choice when studying or getting in the mood for his newfound practice of Zen meditation, but generally he turns to blues--"the gut-bucket, git-down Mississippi blues, the old-time stuff."
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BUSINESS
August 8, 2006 | Adam Gorlick, The Associated Press
Joseph White's home office is like a modern-day hippie hangout. Books on Buddhism and yoga mingle with business planners and a laptop computer. An acoustic guitar rests next to a shuffle of sheet music for "Mr. Tambourine Man," just across the room from a fax machine. And then there are the marijuana stalks. Towering six-footers. Pint-size plants. He even has a few ripe buds kicking around on a desk, not far from his cellphone. His stash is for sale, but it won't get you stoned.
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BOOKS
October 23, 1994 | Lawrence S. Dietz, Lawrence S. Dietz, who wrote a car column for California Magazine, drives a 1985 Peugeot 505 Turbo sedan
President Calvin Coolidge didn't say much, but his announcement that "The business of America is business" ought to be considered a worthy substitute for "In God We Trust" on our paper money, since the closest thing to heaven for most Americans is a profitable bottom line. Of all the businesses in this country, the one that has been most closely identified with, and provided the economic underpinnings for, our national being is the manufacture of motor vehicles, primarily automobiles.
NEWS
December 26, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen Joseph, one of South Africa's earliest white campaigners against apartheid, a longtime confidant of Nelson and Winnie Mandela, and the first person placed under house arrest in this divided country, died here Friday at age 87. Mrs. Joseph, a militant former labor leader, battled successive white-minority governments for more than 40 years and suffered some of Pretoria's most onerous restrictions.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2006 | Adam Gorlick, The Associated Press
Joseph White's home office is like a modern-day hippie hangout. Books on Buddhism and yoga mingle with business planners and a laptop computer. An acoustic guitar rests next to a shuffle of sheet music for "Mr. Tambourine Man," just across the room from a fax machine. And then there are the marijuana stalks. Towering six-footers. Pint-size plants. He even has a few ripe buds kicking around on a desk, not far from his cellphone. His stash is for sale, but it won't get you stoned.
BOOKS
October 23, 1994 | Lawrence S. Dietz, Lawrence S. Dietz, who wrote a car column for California Magazine, drives a 1985 Peugeot 505 Turbo sedan
President Calvin Coolidge didn't say much, but his announcement that "The business of America is business" ought to be considered a worthy substitute for "In God We Trust" on our paper money, since the closest thing to heaven for most Americans is a profitable bottom line. Of all the businesses in this country, the one that has been most closely identified with, and provided the economic underpinnings for, our national being is the manufacture of motor vehicles, primarily automobiles.
NEWS
May 31, 1987 | LARRY DOYLE, United Press International
Jessica Van Dyke was an exceptionally bright 13-year-old. Her parents cannot believe she would have taken aspirin for chicken pox if she had thought it anything but safe. "Our philosophy has always been, when there's any doubt, you don't do it," said Roger D. Heller, her stepfather. "That's what we always taught Jessica." Jessica liked to write poetry and played field hockey at Wiley Middle School in University Heights, a suburb of Cleveland.
NEWS
July 18, 2000 | Associated Press
Officers from a dozen local and state agencies searched Monday for the killer who shot the police chief in this small town. Joseph White was found Sunday beside the open door of his police car in the parking lot of a dialysis center. He was shot once in the head or neck, Northampton County Sheriff Wardie Vincent said. "We believe he was checking his vehicle or getting ready to make a [traffic] stop," Vincent said.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
University of Illinois Chancellor Richard Herman resigned after months of pressure over special attention paid to politically connected applicants at its Urbana-Champaign campus and news that some were admitted over more qualified students. His resignation from the $400,000-a-year job is effective Monday. Herman, 68, will remain with the school as a tenured math professor, the university said, earning $244,000 a year. The faculty senate last month called for Herman, who is in charge of the Urbana-Champaign campus, and University President B. Joseph White -- chief executive of all three Illinois campuses -- to step down amid the admissions scandal.
NEWS
June 19, 1994 | BRAD BONHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his townhouse a few miles from UC Irvine, Joseph White puts on a string quartet CD and begins to sift through mounds of material on a large, square coffee table. Classical music is his choice when studying or getting in the mood for his newfound practice of Zen meditation, but generally he turns to blues--"the gut-bucket, git-down Mississippi blues, the old-time stuff."
NEWS
December 26, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen Joseph, one of South Africa's earliest white campaigners against apartheid, a longtime confidant of Nelson and Winnie Mandela, and the first person placed under house arrest in this divided country, died here Friday at age 87. Mrs. Joseph, a militant former labor leader, battled successive white-minority governments for more than 40 years and suffered some of Pretoria's most onerous restrictions.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Wall Street Journal Wins 2 Journalism Awards: The Wall Street Journal won two 1993 Gerald Loeb Awards for business journalism. In the large newspaper category, the Journal's Alix M. Freedman won for "Fire Power," a story on the handgun market. In the deadline-beat area, Joseph B. White and Paul Ingrassia won for their coverage of General Motors Corp. The lifetime achievement award went to Carol Loomis, a member of the board of editors at Fortune magazine.
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