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Joseph Yam

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BUSINESS
November 16, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Head of New Monetary Authority Named: The government has named Joseph Yam the chief executive of the yet-to-be-formed Hong Kong Monetary Authority. Yam, 45, was director of the Office of the Exchange Fund. The Monetary Authority, which will combine the work of the Office of the Exchange Fund and the Office of the Commissioner of Banking, will be Hong Kong's equivalent to a central bank. Yam will plan for establishment of the authority pending the approval of necessary legislation.
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BUSINESS
November 16, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Head of New Monetary Authority Named: The government has named Joseph Yam the chief executive of the yet-to-be-formed Hong Kong Monetary Authority. Yam, 45, was director of the Office of the Exchange Fund. The Monetary Authority, which will combine the work of the Office of the Exchange Fund and the Office of the Commissioner of Banking, will be Hong Kong's equivalent to a central bank. Yam will plan for establishment of the authority pending the approval of necessary legislation.
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BUSINESS
January 11, 1999 | From Reuters
Central bankers from several continents gathered Sunday to start the first governor-level meeting convened at Hong Kong's new regional office of the Bank for International Settlements. At least one delegation intends to raise the issue of creating a single Asian currency. "The subject the governors will discuss is essentially whatever is on their minds," BIS General Manager Andrew Crockett told reporters in a media briefing during the weekend.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The recent frenzy to get into the Indian stock market briefly turned into a frenzy to get out Wednesday, driving a key share index down more than 9% after the government moved to curb some foreign cash inflows. The Sensex index on the Bombay Stock Exchange sank 1,744 points, or 9.2%, early in the session, then rebounded to close with a loss of 336 points, or 1.8%, at 18,715.82.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1999 | TOM PLATE, Times contributing editor Tom Plate's column runs Wednesdays. He teaches at UCLA. Email: tplate@ucla.edu
It's probably foolish to hope that Larry Summers, soon to become No. 1 at the U.S. Treasury Department, will prove the answer to Asia's plea for leadership in reforming the world economic system. After all, Summers was championed by the exiting Robert Rubin. In Asia, Rubin is best noted for his successful stewardship of the U.S. economy while Asia went to pot, for bashing Japan for its economic decisions and for throwing cold water on most proposals to reshape the world's economic architecture.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stocks ended mostly lower Monday and bond yields edged up ahead of today's meeting of Federal Reserve policymakers amid concern that the central bank might signal that it is becoming more concerned about inflation. The possibility of a more aggressive Fed helped to stoke a rally in the dollar, driving the euro lower for the fifth session in the last six. On Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrial average lost 64.28 points, or 0.6%, to 10,565.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1998 | TOM PLATE, Times columnist Tom Plate teaches in UCLA's policy studies and communication studies programs. E-mail: tplate@ ucla.edu
These are undoubtedly sad days for Bill Clinton's increasingly frail presidency, but at least he's trying to say the right things about the world's ever more shaky economy. On Sept. 14 in New York he gave a subdued but excellent speech, cynically viewed, unfortunately, by domestic critics who viewed it as an effort to divert attention from mounting problems concerning the Lewinsky matter. That was bad enough.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1998 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Hong Kong passed from British to mainland Chinese control in July 1997, the big fear was that the considerable political and press freedoms enjoyed here would be endangered under the new regime. There was less concern, even among the most alarmist critics, that Hong Kong's vibrant market--long rated one of the freest in the world--would be compromised.
NEWS
June 15, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, Times Staff Writer
If this city were a person, its fortune would be impossible to tell because its defining lines are constantly changing, according to Hau Yat-keung, a palm reader. Even as this seer speaks, his words are interrupted by jackhammers and pile drivers remaking the urban skyline on the newly narrowed banks of Hong Kong Harbor.
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