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Josephine Baker

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NEWS
September 28, 1997 | Kevin Thomas
This 1991 HBO production has has given the legendary entertainer--the rage of '20s Paris, French Resistance heroine, civil rights activist--the royal treatment she so richly deserves. It is highlighted by a knockout portrayal of the complex, sometimes controversial but always heroic Baker by a perfectly cast Lynn Whitfield (pictured), whose ability to bring the durable entertainer to life and span tumultuous decades is nothing short of remarkable (HBO Sunday at 8 p.m.).
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IMAGE
March 24, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
Today it's rare to see a piece of celebrity-worn apparel - on screen or off - that can't be identified and even purchased with a few mouse clicks. From politician Sarah Palin's eyeglass frames (Kawasaki 704s) to film protagonist Jay Gatsby's bow tie (Brooks Bros.), the power of the Internet has made the world one great, big clickable catalog. But what if the jacket you covet was the one Amelia Earhart was wearing on her 1932 solo flight across the Atlantic? Or the dress of your dreams was last seen on Josephine Baker in a 1940 wartime photograph?
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TRAVEL
July 16, 2006
I enjoyed Susan Spano's story of Josephine Baker ["Jazz Age Diva's French Castle," Her World, July 2]. I had the honor of meeting Baker on a flight from New York to Paris in the early 1970s. She was absolutely charming -- just a delightful woman. At that time, I wasn't aware of her significance, but, in retrospect, I am proud to have met her. DAVID E. KELLY Laguna Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014 | By Heller McAlpin
Judith Mackrell's "Flappers" is a juicy, energetic exploration of six dazzling iconoclasts who all flared to fame in the Roaring '20s. Unlike recent books such as Simon Winchester's "The Professor and the Madman" and Edward Ball's "The Inventor and the Tycoon," which explore closely intertwined lives, "Flappers" features multiple mini-biographies of women who interacted only minimally with one another, although they shared common unconventional impetuses...
NEWS
November 24, 1994
Evelyn Anderson, 87, probably the last surviving dancer from the 1920s Josephine Baker revue in Paris. She was only 18 but a veteran of musical productions by Noble Sissle and Eubie Blake when she joined a group being formed to work in Paris. Baker was chosen to headline "La Revue Negre" when a producer saw her featured on a poster. The revue was to tour Europe after its Paris success but Baker jumped to the Folies Bergere and the company disbanded.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Muckenthaler Cultural Center opens its outdoor "Celestial Cinema" series tonight with "Zou Zou," the 1934 French film starring Josephine Baker. When "Zou Zou" came out, St. Louis-born Baker was already a huge celebrity in France, her adopted country. She was a song-and-dance phenom with an appeal both exotic and common. By making the most of her talents, and through savvy image-making, Baker was the queen of the demimonde.
NEWS
March 10, 1991 | DANIEL CERONE, Times Staff Writer
Josephine Baker, described by Ernest Hemingway as the most sensational woman anybody ever saw or ev er will, became the sultry, controversial rage of Europe in the 1920s after leaving the United States at 19 to escape racism. She was called one of the most successful black entertainers of her time and a civil rights leader of historical stature. America never opened its arms to Baker--a sad, recurring strain in the bittersweet ballad of an irrepressible talent.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1987 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Cable's valuable Arts & Entertainment Network launches its new series of biographies at 7 tonight with an intriguing film on Josephine Baker, the St. Louis-born black entertainer who became the rage of Paris. Some of the programs in this lengthy A & E series--studies of Tennessee Williams, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Liv Ullmann and F. Scott Fitzgerald fill out the week--have already aired on American TV. Others, such as tonight's "Josephine Baker: Chasing A Rainbow" from Britain, have not.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1990 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
The morning after appearing on the Oscar show, Diana Ross announced Tuesday that she will play the late entertainer Josephine Baker in a three-hour production for Ted Turner's TNT cable service. It will be her first film role since "The Wiz" in 1978.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Never mind that it's a sad, ironic comment on Hollywood that, 15 years after the death of the legendary Josephine Baker at 68, no studio has made a film about her, even though her life was the stuff of half-a-dozen movies. For now, it is HBO that is presenting "The Josephine Baker Story," premiering Saturday at 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Amy Reiter
As school book fairs and children's library browsers can attest, there is no shortage of biographies aiming to educate young readers about the lives of historical figures, from George Washington to Jackie Robinson, Annie Oakley to Anne Frank, Helen Keller to Harry Houdini, Eleanor Roosevelt to Elvis Presley. This month, several new picture books about famous thinkers and doers - bold breakers of boundaries and blazers of trails - will further crowd the shelves. The best of these deal forthrightly with their subjects' complexities and contradictions, acknowledging that even heroes make mistakes and suffer setbacks and that one can be inspired by someone's successes while acknowledging their failings.
NEWS
March 21, 2011
Jazz singer Josephine Baker called Chateau des Milandes in southwestern France home from 1947 until the late '60s. Now the 15 th century castle is a museum dedicated to the legendary singer. Times reader "Pascale1" visited the chateau last July and shot this photograph. For more on Baker and the castle, read this Times travel article . View past photos we've featured . To upload your own, visit our reader travel photo gallery . When you upload your photo, tell us where it was taken and when.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2006 | Wil Haygood, Washington Post
She was limber, and she was wicked. She had the gift of looking just this side of muscular, and yet quite feminine. Dancing onstage, she could be a blur. It's as if there were mercury in her shoulders, something that could lift her up and spin her around. Her act was a taunt and a tease. It also was a celebration of herself. She knew sex, and she knew the lighted and unlighted dreams of men. And she played with those dreams as the lioness does the fawn.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2006 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Josephine Baker was an American original -- a woman, an artist and an activist who transcended the barriers of racial bigotry that dominated the time in which she lived. Even so, aside from her adopted country of France, her name is not celebrated everywhere to the extent that her remarkable accomplishments deserve. "Josephine Baker: A Life of le Jazz Hot!" at the Egyptian Theatre on Sunday was a welcome step toward an acknowledgment of the African American singer-dancer's legacy.
TRAVEL
July 16, 2006
I enjoyed Susan Spano's story of Josephine Baker ["Jazz Age Diva's French Castle," Her World, July 2]. I had the honor of meeting Baker on a flight from New York to Paris in the early 1970s. She was absolutely charming -- just a delightful woman. At that time, I wasn't aware of her significance, but, in retrospect, I am proud to have met her. DAVID E. KELLY Laguna Beach
TRAVEL
July 2, 2006 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
IT was, as the French say, "un coup de coeur" -- something like love at first sight, but stronger -- when Josephine Baker saw Chateau des Milandes above the Dordogne River in southwestern France. It was 1937. She was the black waif from St. Louis who had taken Paris by storm and still reigned supreme, dancing to hot jazz in little more than sequins and feathers.
BOOKS
July 7, 1991 | CHARLES SOLOMON
One of the most celebrated performers of the century, Josephine Baker lived a life that contained all the elements of a show-biz fantasy: Born into dire poverty in St. Louis, she escaped to become the toast of Paris, a war hero and a tireless crusader for human equality. As she seems to have spent her entire adult life in the spotlight, it's hardly surprising that she fascinates the current, media-conscious generation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2005 | Susan King
The Josephine Baker Collection Kino, $30 each The legendary African American performer (1906-75) got her start as a child, singing and dancing for spare change in the streets of St. Louis. She was a chorus girl on the St. Louis stage until, tired of that city's oppressive racism, Baker ran away from the city -- and her first husband -- at 17.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Brian Gibson, an Emmy-winning British documentary filmmaker who earned acclaim in America for his biopics of Josephine Baker and Tina Turner, has died. He was 59. Gibson died Sunday in a London hospital after a two-year battle with Ewings Sarcoma, a rare form of bone cancer.
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