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Josephine Smith

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NEWS
May 4, 1993 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For some, honor takes the form of a lustrous, faceless statuette. For others, it's wall plaques attesting to one's general wonderfulness and credibility. For Josephine Smith, it comes in the form of a simple beige telephone. The phone is her hot line to Huntley Bookstore--all Smith has to do is push a button and it speed-dials the store. You'd think Huntley staff would be particularly eager to chat with Smith, considering the store gave her the phone already programmed.
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NEWS
May 4, 1993 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For some, honor takes the form of a lustrous, faceless statuette. For others, it's wall plaques attesting to one's general wonderfulness and credibility. For Josephine Smith, it comes in the form of a simple beige telephone. The phone is her hot line to Huntley Bookstore--all Smith has to do is push a button and it speed-dials the store. You'd think Huntley staff would be particularly eager to chat with Smith, considering the store gave her the phone already programmed.
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NEWS
July 16, 1987
Detectives arrested the nephew of one of two elderly women found stabbed to death in an apartment in an unincorporated area near Compton. Larry August, 26, was booked at the Sheriff's Department station in Carson for investigation of murdering his aunt, Josephine Smith, 69, and her sister-in-law, Marie Boller, 85, Sheriff's Sgt. Merlyn Poppleton said.
TRAVEL
May 30, 1999
Canada--Cary Kinkead, Granada Hills: "White Raven Restaurant, 5345 Granville St., Granville Ferry, NS B0S 1K0; telephone (802) 532-5595. Overlooks inlet off Nova Scotia's Bay of Fundy. Gracious owners, varied menus, excellent wine list." Entrees: about $14. England--Josephine Smith, Palos Verdes Estates: "The Carlton Hotel, Falmouth Road, Truro, Cornwall TR1 2HL; tel. 011-44-1872-272-450, fax 011-44-1872-223-938.
HOME & GARDEN
September 18, 2003
With some embarrassment, I read David Colker's "Ants Balk at Chalk, but What's in It?" (Sept. 11). I've no claim to Asian ancestry, only a profound trust in urban legend. Street science assures me that ants don't breathe lung-wise, just through their hides. If I shut off whatever they use for pores, they quit gathering in my kitchen. I don't need to poison them; I just cosset them with leftover baby powder. Two years ago I explained this to a neighbor and he gratefully powdered his own ants to ant heaven and even applied a powdery trail around the kitchen of the Hermosa Beach house he was "sitting" for a traveling friend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1997 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was 1942 and Bill Carreon wasn't concerned much with the prom or graduation. As with many of his classmates at Roosevelt High School in Boyle Heights, his thoughts were focused on faraway battlefields. So in November of his junior year, Carreon, now 73, left girlfriend Priscilla, his family and school to fight with the 3rd Infantry Division in Europe.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | BARRY BEARAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For anyone yet to hear the news, the Eastern Airlines ticket counter here at Miami International looked a mighty welcome place on Saturday. Agents were on duty. There was barely a line. "We have two tickets for New York," said Emil Brown, ready to check his bags and pick up a boarding pass. Instead he was handed a sheet of paper with instructions about how to write for a refund. "Oh boy!" said Brown. "No more Eastern?" "That's right, oh boy!" answered the agent.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2008 | Carol Muske-Dukes, Muske-Dukes is professor of English and creative writing at USC and the author of several books, including "Channeling Mark Twain," "Sparrow" and "An Octave Above Thunder."
Could there be an honorific less American-sounding than poet laureate? The title conjures images of a laurel wreath askew on the pale brow of a loitering bard -- scribbling couplets beside a throne ("I am his Highness' dog at Kew; / Pray tell me, sir, whose dog are you?") British poets laureate write occasional verse to celebrate royal birthdays, ship christenings and Tube station openings. As California's new poet laureate, I haven't been asked to write a sonnet or triolet in honor of Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1994 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A red tag still flaps on the blond wood door of Mike Hernandez's broken Simi Valley house. Six months of sun have faded the red dye to tan, but the bad news remains the same. "I've got to knock it down and rebuild it, that's already been told to me," said Hernandez, straddling a 2-inch crack in the concrete floor. Overhead, the kitchen ceiling splits jaggedly from the walls, and a hole in the living room ceiling yawns 3 feet wide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2008 | Steve Chawkins, Times Staff Writer
In 1908, Lt. Col. Allen Allensworth, a charismatic ex-slave and retired military man, set out to build an all-black community on a hardscrabble patch of land 40 miles north of Bakersfield. This weekend, the centennial of his long-shuttered town will be honored by thousands of Californians trooping to the site, now known as Colonel Allensworth State Historic Park.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It began here in 1908 as a utopia for blacks, a place where former slaves could escape the indignities of discrimination. In its heyday, it was a thriving farm community with a lucrative railroad stopover. There was a constable and a justice of the peace. There were debates, a traveling glee club and theater performances. This was Allensworth, the only town in California established by blacks. But the dream began to fade.
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