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Josephson International

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BUSINESS
July 29, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY
Facing losses from his Herzfeld & Stern brokerage unit--and discontent among ICM agents, who felt that their profits were paying for the parent's missteps--Marvin Josephson began selling non-agency businesses in 1985. Three years later, he and top managers tried to buy out Josephson International for a package of cash and debt that they valued at $13.50 a share, only to have outside directors reject the bid after several shareholders filed suit. Eventually, the group paid $14.
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BUSINESS
July 29, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY
Facing losses from his Herzfeld & Stern brokerage unit--and discontent among ICM agents, who felt that their profits were paying for the parent's missteps--Marvin Josephson began selling non-agency businesses in 1985. Three years later, he and top managers tried to buy out Josephson International for a package of cash and debt that they valued at $13.50 a share, only to have outside directors reject the bid after several shareholders filed suit. Eventually, the group paid $14.
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BUSINESS
September 10, 1985
The acquisition from Josephson International Inc. will make New York-based Gruntal & Co. the nation's 16th-largest securities brokerage and investment banking firm. Josephson paid $17.5 million for Herzfeld early last year; Gruntal Financial will pay $4 million in debt, plus issue warrants on 2 million shares of its stock for the loss-plagued brokerage.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY
Above the door hangs a black top hat with glittery letters that read "Broadway Sam." On the walls are the obligatory posters touting clients--Meryl Streep, Sigourney Weaver, Woody Allen, Diane Wiest, Mike Nichols, Robert Benton, Fred Schepisi, Susan Seidelman. And, in the middle of it all, sits Sam Cohn: co-founder of ICM and, by some accounts, the greatest talent agent in the world.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1989 | KEITH BRADSHER, Times Staff Writer
It has been said that Bostonians dislike seeing their names in print as much as Los Angeles rcrresidents revel in it. True or not, the statement seems to fit Boston Ventures, a tight-lipped pair of low-profile, interlocking partnerships that manage more than $300 million in entertainment and media investments.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1993 | TERRY PRISTIN, Terry Pristin is a Times staff writer
"The Son-in-Law Also Rises," proclaimed a trade paper in 1932 when Louis B. Mayer lured David O. Selznick, husband of his daughter Irene, back to MGM with a lavish deal. These days, at Sony Studios, which occupies MGM's former premises in Culver City, some of the wives rise too.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf took Capitol Hill by storm Wednesday, earning thunderous standing ovations as he extolled the American people for their all-out support during the Persian Gulf conflict and President Bush for giving the military a free hand to win the war with minimum casualties.
SPORTS
May 9, 1986 | LARRY STEWART
Just when it appeared that CBS had come up with a near-perfect telecast Thursday night, the network blew it. The Lakers had finished eliminating the Dallas Mavericks. Director Sandy Grossman had supplied all the right pictures, announcer Dick Stockton had turned in another solid performance, and commentator Tom Heinsohn, who'll never win any popularity contests in Los Angeles, had actually offered some good observations.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2000 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Grapevine," an ensemble comedy set in Miami Beach, where young, single people alternately date, fall in and out of love and talk to the camera about it all, begins its second life on CBS tonight, eight years after it entered an unusual state of limbo. Produced in the early days of the network's in-house studio, CBS Productions, "Grapevine" originally debuted in the summer of 1992, aired for six episodes and promptly disappeared.
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