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Josh Agle

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HOME & GARDEN
January 20, 2005 | David A. Keeps, Special to The Times
Josh AGLE, the artist popularly known as Shag, doesn't just draw from life. He paints from his living room. Using the architecture and interior design of his own home, he creates the candy-colored, acrylic-on-Masonite works that have made him an art world double threat -- gallery star and hip commercial brand.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2009 | By Karen Wada
Given its penchant for eclectic programming, it's no surprise that the Hollywood Bowl curates its show posters the same way it curates its shows. "Musically, we always want to do something unique," says Laura Connelly, director of presentations for the Los Angeles Philharmonic Assn., which oversees the Bowl's concert lineup. "It's not about putting all the big names together, but coming up with pairings that produce something special. The posters are a reflection of that." Last summer, the Bowl asked a dozen artists, including rock-graphics guru Stanley Mouse, punk painter Niagara and the retro-cool Shag to design images for performers such as Grace Jones, Pink Martini and Death Cab for Cutie.
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HOME & GARDEN
January 27, 2005
Re "House as Art, Dig?" [Jan. 20]: I always knew that I would hear about Josh Agle's creative life as he continued to evolve. In the 1980s, I had the honor of employing Josh and his twin brother, Travis, in my picture framing shop in Irvine. I was trying to balance a career in picture framing while being a psychologist and a mother to a preschooler. I was always afraid that I would lose Josh to his art career or to the Swamp Zombies, until I heard the Swamp Zombies perform at the Sawdust Festival in Laguna.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2006 | Lynne Heffley
Candy colors and cocktails, cat's-eye make-up, beehive hair, skinny ties and tiki kitsch: The art of Josh Agle, better known as Shag, is unmistakable. His 1950s-'60s retro-hipster work sprang to three-dimensional life last year at the Los Angeles Theatre Center in "Shag With a Twist," a musical murder-mystery created as a collaborative effort between the artist and choreographer-director Cindy Bradley, co-founder of San Pedro City Ballet.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2006 | Lynne Heffley
Candy colors and cocktails, cat's-eye make-up, beehive hair, skinny ties and tiki kitsch: The art of Josh Agle, better known as Shag, is unmistakable. His 1950s-'60s retro-hipster work sprang to three-dimensional life last year at the Los Angeles Theatre Center in "Shag With a Twist," a musical murder-mystery created as a collaborative effort between the artist and choreographer-director Cindy Bradley, co-founder of San Pedro City Ballet.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2009 | By Karen Wada
Given its penchant for eclectic programming, it's no surprise that the Hollywood Bowl curates its show posters the same way it curates its shows. "Musically, we always want to do something unique," says Laura Connelly, director of presentations for the Los Angeles Philharmonic Assn., which oversees the Bowl's concert lineup. "It's not about putting all the big names together, but coming up with pairings that produce something special. The posters are a reflection of that." Last summer, the Bowl asked a dozen artists, including rock-graphics guru Stanley Mouse, punk painter Niagara and the retro-cool Shag to design images for performers such as Grace Jones, Pink Martini and Death Cab for Cutie.
MAGAZINE
October 13, 2002 | RENEE VOGEL
I went to Japan for the first time. I went with my brother Piet and Billy Shire, who owns the Wacko store in L.A. I wanted to see the two sides of Japan that interest me. The frenetic pop culture side [is] what we did in Tokyo. Shibuya is where all the kids go to be hip and hang out. It's like Melrose Avenue but kicked up. I loved it. We went to Kyoto. That was the other side of Japanese culture, the ancient imperial state of Japan. Our host was a Japanese pop star.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1988 | MIKE BOEHM
When the Swamp Zombies started out three years ago, the band's founding principle was to travel light. No amplifiers, no drum sets, no stacks of sound equipment or any of the other usual rock band accouterments. Just a couple of acoustic guitars, some basic percussion, including bongo drums, and a big upright bass. The Swamp Zombies didn't need a plug or a wall socket; all they needed was a patch of pavement.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1997 | JOHN ROOS
Yes, there are a few tasty dips into punk-flavored rockabilly here, as well as some spirited surf-guitar licks. But overall, Los Infernos can't rise above its songwriting woes on this debut album. Sonically, the hard-charging Riverside quintet grooves with an aggressive edge. Guitars rattle and shake; the anguished vocals of Derek Coon cry out, and a sturdy backbeat brings rhythm to the gritty, roadhouse rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1987 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
If not for the decibel-crunching power of Marshall amplifiers, the Swamp Zombies might never have turned to acoustic music and become one of Orange County's most refreshingly offbeat bands.
HOME & GARDEN
January 27, 2005
Re "House as Art, Dig?" [Jan. 20]: I always knew that I would hear about Josh Agle's creative life as he continued to evolve. In the 1980s, I had the honor of employing Josh and his twin brother, Travis, in my picture framing shop in Irvine. I was trying to balance a career in picture framing while being a psychologist and a mother to a preschooler. I was always afraid that I would lose Josh to his art career or to the Swamp Zombies, until I heard the Swamp Zombies perform at the Sawdust Festival in Laguna.
HOME & GARDEN
January 20, 2005 | David A. Keeps, Special to The Times
Josh AGLE, the artist popularly known as Shag, doesn't just draw from life. He paints from his living room. Using the architecture and interior design of his own home, he creates the candy-colored, acrylic-on-Masonite works that have made him an art world double threat -- gallery star and hip commercial brand.
MAGAZINE
October 13, 2002 | RENEE VOGEL
I went to Japan for the first time. I went with my brother Piet and Billy Shire, who owns the Wacko store in L.A. I wanted to see the two sides of Japan that interest me. The frenetic pop culture side [is] what we did in Tokyo. Shibuya is where all the kids go to be hip and hang out. It's like Melrose Avenue but kicked up. I loved it. We went to Kyoto. That was the other side of Japanese culture, the ancient imperial state of Japan. Our host was a Japanese pop star.
HOME & GARDEN
April 14, 2001 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Josh Agle could have a hut for a home, he'd indulge in luaus. Instead, the artist; his wife, Glen; and their 2-year-old daughter, Zoey, live in a '50s-era house smack in the middle of historic Orange. But in homage to Agle's love of the tropics, the home is decorated in tiki to the max. The tropical madness starts in the frontyard--a grimacing face of a tiki god peers into the street--and continues throughout the red-trimmed tract home.
NEWS
January 12, 2006 | Alex Chun
Even in her 70s, Mamie Van Doren can still put the va-va in va-va-voom. So on Saturday, the woman who in her heyday was known as one of the "Three Ms," along with Marilyn Monroe and Jayne Mansfield, will relive her glory years when she plays hostess and pinup model at the opening of "Blonde Bombshell" at Palm Springs' M Modern Gallery. In addition to photos of Van Doren, the show will feature more than 100 works celebrating the platinum icons of yesteryear.
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