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Josh Earnest

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NATIONAL
June 16, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) is asking for information on any role First Lady Michelle Obama's office may have played in the president's decision to fire the inspector general of AmeriCorps over his investigation of Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson. Grassley requested that Alan Solomont, chairman of the government-run Corporation for National and Community Service, which runs AmeriCorps, provide all records related to contacts with the first lady's office. Both Solomont, a Democrat, and the board's vice chairman, Republican Stephen Goldsmith, have said they backed President Obama's decision to fire Gerald Walpin.
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WORLD
August 22, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - In February 2011, when Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak bowed to a popular uprising and relinquished power, President Obama welcomed the change and declared, "Egypt will never be the same. " Two and a half years after the elation of the "Arab Spring," Egypt looks much as it did under the aging autocrat, only more violently polarized. Critics say Obama has mostly watched from the sidelines. Mubarak's court-ordered release from prison Thursday in effect capped the end of Egypt's brief experiment with democracy and its return to military rule.
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NEWS
August 25, 2011 | By Maeve Reston and Kim Geiger
On vacation in Martha's Vineyard, President Obama managed to squeeze in some family time Thursday afternoon after spending the morning taking briefings on the economy, the situation in Libya and Hurricane Irene. Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama and their two daughters spent the afternoon at a private beach, which they have already visited twice since arriving in Martha's Vineyard last Thursday. Before heading to the beach, Obama was briefed by his top counterterrorism advisor, John Brennan, on overnight developments in Libya.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- Immigration legislation pending in Congress would create jobs in rural communities and increase exports of fruits, vegetables and other products, the Obama administration said Monday as it tried turn up the heat on Republican opponents of the bill. In a White House report issued Monday, the administration made an economic case for the stalled immigration bill by emphasizing the legislation's impact on farm towns, typically bastions of GOP support. The bill would ease a shortage of U.S.-born farmworkers by expanding a temporary worker visa program and create a path to citizenship for farmworkers already in the country illegally, the report said.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By Christi Parsons and Michael Muskal, Washington Bureau
Robert Gibbs, the media face of the Obama presidency, will leave his post as White House spokesman and will boost the president's reelection drive from outside the West Wing. The departure of Gibbs as the chief spokesman has been rumored for weeks, but it was unclear whether he would stay in another job within the administration or whether he would leave the White House to work for Obama from outside. Gibbs confirmed this morning that he will leave sometime in early February, after the president delivers his State of the Union speech to the new Congress.
WORLD
May 5, 2013 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - Recent Israeli strikes inside Syria may have exposed weaknesses in the regime's air defenses and could embolden the U.S. and its allies to take more steps to aid rebels fighting the regime there, said lawmakers on Sunday. “The Russian-supplied air defense systems are not as good as said,” Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.) said on NBC's "Meet the Press. " Leahy, who heads the appropriations subcommittee on foreign operations, said the Israeli defense forces were using American-made F-16 Fighting Falcon jets to launch the missiles against Syrian targets.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- Immigration legislation pending in Congress would create jobs in rural communities and increase exports of fruits, vegetables and other products, the Obama administration said Monday as it tried turn up the heat on Republican opponents of the bill. In a White House report issued Monday, the administration made an economic case for the stalled immigration bill by emphasizing the legislation's impact on farm towns, typically bastions of GOP support. The bill would ease a shortage of U.S.-born farmworkers by expanding a temporary worker visa program and create a path to citizenship for farmworkers already in the country illegally, the report said.
OPINION
May 8, 2013 | Doyle McManus
For the last two months, President Obama has been mired in Washington's inside game, caught up in backroom congressional politics as he tried unsuccessfully to pass a bill on gun control and nudge Republican senators toward compromise on the budget. But do his losses mean, as some pundits suggest, that, four months into his second term, the president is already a lame duck? The answer may depend on the mood far outside the capital. This week, the president is leaving town to launch what the White House, reverting to campaign mode, is calling a "middle-class jobs and opportunities tour.
NATIONAL
January 1, 2012 | By Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
Heading into the new year, President Obama will insist that Congress renew the payroll tax cut through the end of 2012, but will otherwise limit his dealings with an unpopular Congress, and instead travel the country to deliver his reelection message directly to voters, a White House aide said. "In terms of the president's relationship with Congress in 2012 — the state of the debate, if you will — the president is no longer tied to Washington, D.C.," spokesman Josh Earnest said in a news briefing in Honolulu.
WORLD
August 22, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - In February 2011, when Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak bowed to a popular uprising and relinquished power, President Obama welcomed the change and declared, "Egypt will never be the same. " Two and a half years after the elation of the "Arab Spring," Egypt looks much as it did under the aging autocrat, only more violently polarized. Critics say Obama has mostly watched from the sidelines. Mubarak's court-ordered release from prison Thursday in effect capped the end of Egypt's brief experiment with democracy and its return to military rule.
OPINION
May 8, 2013 | Doyle McManus
For the last two months, President Obama has been mired in Washington's inside game, caught up in backroom congressional politics as he tried unsuccessfully to pass a bill on gun control and nudge Republican senators toward compromise on the budget. But do his losses mean, as some pundits suggest, that, four months into his second term, the president is already a lame duck? The answer may depend on the mood far outside the capital. This week, the president is leaving town to launch what the White House, reverting to campaign mode, is calling a "middle-class jobs and opportunities tour.
WORLD
May 5, 2013 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - Recent Israeli strikes inside Syria may have exposed weaknesses in the regime's air defenses and could embolden the U.S. and its allies to take more steps to aid rebels fighting the regime there, said lawmakers on Sunday. “The Russian-supplied air defense systems are not as good as said,” Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.) said on NBC's "Meet the Press. " Leahy, who heads the appropriations subcommittee on foreign operations, said the Israeli defense forces were using American-made F-16 Fighting Falcon jets to launch the missiles against Syrian targets.
NATIONAL
January 1, 2012 | By Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
Heading into the new year, President Obama will insist that Congress renew the payroll tax cut through the end of 2012, but will otherwise limit his dealings with an unpopular Congress, and instead travel the country to deliver his reelection message directly to voters, a White House aide said. "In terms of the president's relationship with Congress in 2012 — the state of the debate, if you will — the president is no longer tied to Washington, D.C.," spokesman Josh Earnest said in a news briefing in Honolulu.
NEWS
August 25, 2011 | By Maeve Reston and Kim Geiger
On vacation in Martha's Vineyard, President Obama managed to squeeze in some family time Thursday afternoon after spending the morning taking briefings on the economy, the situation in Libya and Hurricane Irene. Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama and their two daughters spent the afternoon at a private beach, which they have already visited twice since arriving in Martha's Vineyard last Thursday. Before heading to the beach, Obama was briefed by his top counterterrorism advisor, John Brennan, on overnight developments in Libya.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By Christi Parsons and Michael Muskal, Washington Bureau
Robert Gibbs, the media face of the Obama presidency, will leave his post as White House spokesman and will boost the president's reelection drive from outside the West Wing. The departure of Gibbs as the chief spokesman has been rumored for weeks, but it was unclear whether he would stay in another job within the administration or whether he would leave the White House to work for Obama from outside. Gibbs confirmed this morning that he will leave sometime in early February, after the president delivers his State of the Union speech to the new Congress.
NATIONAL
June 16, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) is asking for information on any role First Lady Michelle Obama's office may have played in the president's decision to fire the inspector general of AmeriCorps over his investigation of Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson. Grassley requested that Alan Solomont, chairman of the government-run Corporation for National and Community Service, which runs AmeriCorps, provide all records related to contacts with the first lady's office. Both Solomont, a Democrat, and the board's vice chairman, Republican Stephen Goldsmith, have said they backed President Obama's decision to fire Gerald Walpin.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2009 | TIMES STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
President Obama plans to fire the inspector general who investigates AmeriCorps and other national service programs amid a controversy between the inspector general and Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson, who is an Obama supporter and former NBA basketball star. The inspector general, Gerald Walpin, was criticized by the U.S. attorney in Sacramento for the way he handled an investigation of Johnson and his nonprofit group, St. HOPE Academy, which received federal grants from the Corporation for National Community Service.
NATIONAL
June 13, 2008 | Anthony Man, South Florida Sun-Sentinel
Party unity is on the agenda at the Florida Democrats' Jefferson-Jackson weekend. But first, before celebrating Barack Obama, they'll engage in a little ritual bloodletting. The Obama campaign wants a new selection of some delegates to August's convention in Denver to reward supporters. Broward County Commissioner Stacy Ritter, for one, endorsed Obama last summer and campaigned for him even as almost every elected Democrat in the county backed Hillary Rodham Clinton.
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