Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJosh Gibson
IN THE NEWS

Josh Gibson

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
July 23, 2006 | Lonnie White
Sean Gibson, great-grandson of Hall of Fame catcher Josh Gibson, didn't play baseball, but that has not stopped him from maintaining his family's commitment to the sport. "My great-grandfather was denied an opportunity to play baseball because of his skin color, and my goal is to make sure that doesn't happen to any child today," said Gibson, who heads the Josh Gibson Foundation, a Pittsburgh-based nonprofit organization that promotes baseball and educating disadvantaged youths.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2009 | David Davis, Davis is a contributing writer at Los Angeles magazine.
How fast could pitcher Leroy "Satchel" Paige hurl a baseball? According to catcher Biz Mackey, a Paige contemporary, Satchel's fastball "tends to disappear. Yes, disappear. I've heard about Satchel throwing pitches that wasn't hit but that never showed up in the catcher's mitt nevertheless. They say the catcher, the umpire and bat boys looked all over for that ball, but it was gone. Now how do you account for that?"
Advertisement
SPORTS
September 10, 1998 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One has to wonder what Josh Gibson would have thought about Mark McGwire. Today, McGwire is the king of the home run after breaking major league baseball's single-season record of 61, but in the late 1930s, Gibson put up numbers in the Negro leagues that even dwarfed McGwire's. In 1936, nine years after Babe Ruth had hit 60 home runs with the New York Yankees, Gibson hit 84 homers in 170 games for the Pittsburgh Crawfords, according to "The Biographical Encyclopedia of the Negro Leagues."
OPINION
July 24, 2009 | Larry Tye, Larry Tye is the author of the just-published biography "Satchel: The Life and Times of an American Legend."
When the National Baseball Hall of Fame holds its induction ceremonies Sunday in Cooperstown, N.Y., both players on the platform -- Jim Rice and Rickey Henderson -- will be African Americans. To some, it is a troubling reminder that African American participation in baseball has plummeted by two-thirds since Rice and Henderson broke into the game.
SPORTS
July 23, 2006 | Lonnie White, Times Staff Writer
George "Mule" Suttles was just where he wanted to be. He stood at the plate on the biggest stage of his era, the game on the line, his huge 50-ounce baseball bat across muscular shoulders formed in his younger years toiling in Alabama coal mines. It was Aug. 11, 1935, and Comiskey Park in Chicago was packed with 50,000 fans and celebrities for the annual East-West Classic -- All-Stars from the Negro National League squaring off against the Negro American League.
SPORTS
July 30, 2006 | Lonnie White, Times Staff Writer
Baseball's-best discussions don't all involve Hank Aaron, Babe Ruth and Barry Bonds, or "Murderers' Row" versus "The Big Red Machine." In fact, one of the longest-running debates in the game's history stems from the old Negro leagues: Which team was the most powerful, the Pittsburgh Crawfords, Kansas City Monarchs or Homestead Grays? Old-timers from that era aren't much help in providing answers.
SPORTS
March 3, 1985 | Associated Press
Like an old photo tattering at the edges, the national pastime lingers in the nation's capital only as a memory. April will mark the 14th season without baseball in Washington, a city where baseball origins date back before the turn of the century. According to sports historians, the first professional team to represent Washington was the Olympic baseball club, in 1871. Soon afterward, a team called the Nationals as admitted into the National League.
SPORTS
June 7, 1992 | STEVE JACOBSON, NEWSDAY
First thing by dawn's early light, they'd stop the bus on the all-night roll to another game, pick up the newspapers and open directly to the box scores. How did Jackie Robinson do? He was one of theirs. "He was the idol," Lester Lockett recalled. "It told them maybe they had a chance." Lockett was 35 years old then and understood that his time had come and past in the Negro League.
SPORTS
September 18, 1988 | ALAN ROBINSON, Associated Press
Only the ball was white, the Grays were the dominant team and just about the only green the underpaid players saw was the spotty outfield grass. But 40 years after the last Negro League World Series, time and fading memories haven't diminished black baseball's impact on America. "Many people today, especially the young people, don't realize how bad the racism was," said Monte Irvin, one of the first blacks to cross baseball's color line in the late 1940s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2006 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Robert W. Peterson, a former newspaper editor who shed light on a little-known aspect of baseball history with his seminal book on the sport's Negro Leagues, "Only the Ball Was White," has died. He was 80. Peterson, who had lung cancer and emphysema, died of a heart attack Feb. 11 at a hospital near Allentown, Pa., according to his wife, Peggy. Published in 1970, "Only the Ball Was White" was the first detailed accounting of Negro baseball.
SPORTS
July 30, 2006 | Lonnie White, Times Staff Writer
Baseball's-best discussions don't all involve Hank Aaron, Babe Ruth and Barry Bonds, or "Murderers' Row" versus "The Big Red Machine." In fact, one of the longest-running debates in the game's history stems from the old Negro leagues: Which team was the most powerful, the Pittsburgh Crawfords, Kansas City Monarchs or Homestead Grays? Old-timers from that era aren't much help in providing answers.
SPORTS
July 23, 2006 | Lonnie White
Sean Gibson, great-grandson of Hall of Fame catcher Josh Gibson, didn't play baseball, but that has not stopped him from maintaining his family's commitment to the sport. "My great-grandfather was denied an opportunity to play baseball because of his skin color, and my goal is to make sure that doesn't happen to any child today," said Gibson, who heads the Josh Gibson Foundation, a Pittsburgh-based nonprofit organization that promotes baseball and educating disadvantaged youths.
SPORTS
July 23, 2006 | Lonnie White, Times Staff Writer
George "Mule" Suttles was just where he wanted to be. He stood at the plate on the biggest stage of his era, the game on the line, his huge 50-ounce baseball bat across muscular shoulders formed in his younger years toiling in Alabama coal mines. It was Aug. 11, 1935, and Comiskey Park in Chicago was packed with 50,000 fans and celebrities for the annual East-West Classic -- All-Stars from the Negro National League squaring off against the Negro American League.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2006 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Robert W. Peterson, a former newspaper editor who shed light on a little-known aspect of baseball history with his seminal book on the sport's Negro Leagues, "Only the Ball Was White," has died. He was 80. Peterson, who had lung cancer and emphysema, died of a heart attack Feb. 11 at a hospital near Allentown, Pa., according to his wife, Peggy. Published in 1970, "Only the Ball Was White" was the first detailed accounting of Negro baseball.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2005 | David Davis, Special to The Times
The voice is spry, the tone impatient, the message clear: At 82, photographer Ernest Withers wants you to know, he is very busy. "I'm hung up on life," he said by telephone from his Memphis studio. "As the old hymn goes, I was meant to work until my day is done." For nearly 60 years, Withers has spent his days and nights producing extraordinary images of the African American experience.
SPORTS
September 10, 1998 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One has to wonder what Josh Gibson would have thought about Mark McGwire. Today, McGwire is the king of the home run after breaking major league baseball's single-season record of 61, but in the late 1930s, Gibson put up numbers in the Negro leagues that even dwarfed McGwire's. In 1936, nine years after Babe Ruth had hit 60 home runs with the New York Yankees, Gibson hit 84 homers in 170 games for the Pittsburgh Crawfords, according to "The Biographical Encyclopedia of the Negro Leagues."
OPINION
July 24, 2009 | Larry Tye, Larry Tye is the author of the just-published biography "Satchel: The Life and Times of an American Legend."
When the National Baseball Hall of Fame holds its induction ceremonies Sunday in Cooperstown, N.Y., both players on the platform -- Jim Rice and Rickey Henderson -- will be African Americans. To some, it is a troubling reminder that African American participation in baseball has plummeted by two-thirds since Rice and Henderson broke into the game.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2009 | David Davis, Davis is a contributing writer at Los Angeles magazine.
How fast could pitcher Leroy "Satchel" Paige hurl a baseball? According to catcher Biz Mackey, a Paige contemporary, Satchel's fastball "tends to disappear. Yes, disappear. I've heard about Satchel throwing pitches that wasn't hit but that never showed up in the catcher's mitt nevertheless. They say the catcher, the umpire and bat boys looked all over for that ball, but it was gone. Now how do you account for that?"
SPORTS
June 7, 1992 | STEVE JACOBSON, NEWSDAY
First thing by dawn's early light, they'd stop the bus on the all-night roll to another game, pick up the newspapers and open directly to the box scores. How did Jackie Robinson do? He was one of theirs. "He was the idol," Lester Lockett recalled. "It told them maybe they had a chance." Lockett was 35 years old then and understood that his time had come and past in the Negro League.
SPORTS
September 18, 1988 | ALAN ROBINSON, Associated Press
Only the ball was white, the Grays were the dominant team and just about the only green the underpaid players saw was the spotty outfield grass. But 40 years after the last Negro League World Series, time and fading memories haven't diminished black baseball's impact on America. "Many people today, especially the young people, don't realize how bad the racism was," said Monte Irvin, one of the first blacks to cross baseball's color line in the late 1940s.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|