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Josh Norek

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2001 | JOHN L. MITCHELL and AGUSTIN GURZA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite the possibility of demonstrations, Inglewood officials Tuesday welcomed a last-minute decision to move the Latin Grammy Awards from Miami to the Forum on Sept. 11. "This is not the first major entertainment event that has been handled by the city of Inglewood, and it won't be the last," Mayor Roosevelt Dorn said. C.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2011
Toxicology results released to the family of singer Amy Winehouse this week raised almost as many questions as they answered, experts said Wednesday, keeping the cause of the "Rehab" singer's death a mystery. The Winehouse family issued a statement on Tuesday saying no illegal substances were found in the 27-year-old's system after her death at her London home on July 23. The absence of banned drugs may come as a relief to her father, Mitch, given Winehouse's history of drug and alcohol addiction and rampant speculation about the role narcotics may have played in her death.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2001 | ERNESTO LECHNER, Ernesto Lechner is a regular contributor to Calendar
During last year's Revolucion Latin rock tour, publicist Josh Norek flew from his New York base to Los Angeles to handle the press for singer Julieta Venegas' "Bueninvento" album. Instead of schmoozing backstage with the other insiders at the tour's Universal Amphitheatre date, Norek was inside the hall. Nothing would make him miss Jumbo, one of his favorite Mexican bands. Norek doesn't fit the stereotype of the rock en espanol fan.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Human beings have trouble sitting still when the Mexican techno-funk band Kinky fires up its hit song "Más" (More), with an insinuating bass line that recalls '70s Philly-soul classics like the O'Jays' "For the Love of Money. " But what's the message conveyed by the tune's increasingly frantic refrain, "Vamos queriendo más y más" (We keep wanting more and more)? Is it an invite to a group love-in, or a commentary on consumerism run amok? It's no wonder that "Más" has been used in Nissan commercials as well as in Tony Scott's brutal vigilante thriller "Man on Fire.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Los Abandoned always had a flair for the theatrical. So when the L.A. bilingual band decided to stage a one-night-only reunion show at the Echoplex this Friday, four years after breaking up in memorably dramatic style, it named the event the "Resurrection" concert and timed it to celebrate Day of the Dead. The set-opening number? Band members are joking about covering Peaches & Herb's "Reunited. " "It's basically a big-ass thank-you to our fans, to our community," said bass player Moises Baqueiro, also known as Vira Lata, explaining what prompted Los Abandoned to come together for a projected 30-song show that will trace its entire creative arc and empty out its catalog.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2003 | Ernesto Lechner, Special to The Times
For the past 14 years, Los Angeles-based rock en espanol entrepreneur Tomas Cookman has championed the music that he passionately believes in, dreaming of the day when the Latin alternative movement becomes part of the American mainstream.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2002 | AGUSTIN GURZA
Normally, publicist Josh Norek has to do a lot of explaining about the bands he represents from the world of rock en espanol. In New York, where he's lived and worked all his life, most people have never heard of Mexico's Jaguares or Argentina's Santos Inocentes. His clients never get airplay on Spanish radio in the Big Apple, where salsa is king. And the average Latino on the street? Forget about it. New Yorkers wouldn't know Jaguares' idolized lead singer, Saul Hernandez, from Pepe LePew.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2002 | AGUSTIN GURZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"LATV Live" has the look of a television show taken over by a band of Latino college kids with an unruly enthusiasm for music and esoteric tastes. Instead of sharing their favorite music videos with their roommates, this kinetic crew of twentysomethings gets to play at being veejays in prime time on KJLA, a full-power station that reaches almost 3 million households in Southern California over the air (Channel 57), via satellite and on most area cable systems.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Listeners tuning in to KCSN's new HD2 radio station will notice something once unheard of but increasingly common in American culture: Spanish and English being spoken - and sung - together, almost interchangeably. One day recently, for example, the Cal State Northridge public radio station played "Hypnotized," an erotically chill trip-hop track by the British band Morcheeba, sung in English, with Chile's Ana Tijoux adding a Spanish-language rap. A quarter-hour later, KCSN fired up "Cinco Minutos Con Vos" (Five Minutes With You)
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