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Josh Schweitzer

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MAGAZINE
July 8, 1990 | KAREN STABINER, Contributing editor Karen Stabiner lives in a house with a second floor designed by Schweitzer.
WHEN HE WAS a child, there was plenty of space: Josh Schweitzer's early Midwestern memories include a lush, untouched ravine hard by a babbling brook, rolling rural vistas that met the sky uninterrupted and a rambling wreck of an outsized colonial mansion with too many rooms, too many fireplaces and an abandoned barn out back for him, his brother and sister to play in. Now the only room to move is in his imagination.
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BUSINESS
December 7, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Irregularly shaped windows and openings add an unexpected bit of playfulness to this wooded retreat in Pacific Palisades. Built in the 1950s, the home was redesigned by local architect Josh Schweitzer, who is known for his imaginative work on restaurants and houses. Location: 16130 W. Northfield St., Pacific Palisades 90272 Asking price: $3.325 million Year built: 1951 House size: Four bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms, 3,494 square feet Lot size: 18,044 square feet Features: Open-plan living, dining and kitchen area, den/office, three fireplaces, walled courtyard with swimming pool, outdoor dining area, mature trees, stream About the area: In the first half of the year, 170 single-family homes sold in the 90272 ZIP Code at a median price of $2.268 million, according to DataQuick.
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MAGAZINE
October 14, 1990
Regarding reader response to "Joshing Around," by Karen Stabiner: Having worked as a lead carpenter for 20 years throughout the western United States, I have had the opportunity to physically create what an architect has drawn. I have built homes, hotels, retreats and restaurants for licensed architects and engineers, barns for farmers and dream homes for fledgling yuppies. Last year I had the opportunity to work with the celebrated, yet maligned, Josh Schweitzer on the creation of Campanile restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2009 | Ben Fritz
Getting divorced was a lonely experience for Josh Schweitzer. Spending his days overseeing construction workers and his evenings caring for his 3-year-old son, he had no one to talk to. But there was one group of people who helped him pull through -- even though he'd never laid eyes on most of them. They were his World of Warcraft friends -- "guild people," he calls them. They live all over the world and spend 20, 30 or more hours a week together in the online world of Azeroth as druids, priests, warriors and rogues, slaying monsters and collecting treasure.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Irregularly shaped windows and openings add an unexpected bit of playfulness to this wooded retreat in Pacific Palisades. Built in the 1950s, the home was redesigned by local architect Josh Schweitzer, who is known for his imaginative work on restaurants and houses. Location: 16130 W. Northfield St., Pacific Palisades 90272 Asking price: $3.325 million Year built: 1951 House size: Four bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms, 3,494 square feet Lot size: 18,044 square feet Features: Open-plan living, dining and kitchen area, den/office, three fireplaces, walled courtyard with swimming pool, outdoor dining area, mature trees, stream About the area: In the first half of the year, 170 single-family homes sold in the 90272 ZIP Code at a median price of $2.268 million, according to DataQuick.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2009 | Ben Fritz
Getting divorced was a lonely experience for Josh Schweitzer. Spending his days overseeing construction workers and his evenings caring for his 3-year-old son, he had no one to talk to. But there was one group of people who helped him pull through -- even though he'd never laid eyes on most of them. They were his World of Warcraft friends -- "guild people," he calls them. They live all over the world and spend 20, 30 or more hours a week together in the online world of Azeroth as druids, priests, warriors and rogues, slaying monsters and collecting treasure.
MAGAZINE
December 23, 1990 | BARBARA FOLEY
THE OWNERS SAY Studio will be 10 times its size in year. Sound like so much immodest hype? Not really. Owners Tom Gillman and Ronnie Romoff opened the 150-square-foot Studio on an alley off Montana Avenue in Santa Monica with modest expectations and minimum exposure. Word of mouth is turning it into a multiseasonal blockbuster. Headliners include Ronaldus Shamask's premier men's collection, l.a. Eyeworks sunglasses and a lovely collection of soaps and fragrances from abroad.
MAGAZINE
August 26, 1990
Josh Schweitzer's creative design of the Hollywood photographer's studio ("Joshing Around," by Karen Stabiner) fails to incorporate certain elements required by building codes and safety considerations. His stairways are lovely design elements but are not suitable for use. Stairs with 18-inch risers provide challenging training for firefighters but are a real problem when a fire occurs. And "tall, spry" individuals aren't the only ones who might need to negotiate those stairs under ordinary circumstances.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1990 | LAURIE OCHOA
Los Angeles' upscale take-out phenomenon has recently entered a new stage. Where two, three years ago you might have walked into a sweet-looking little shop to pick up, say, a Cornish game hen and an assortment of pasta salads, now you can walk into a modern, bright, highly designed space and order . . . Cornish game hen and an assortment of pasta salads. But even the same old food seems somehow slicker now. The huge success of the mom-and-pop take-outs has led to professionalization.
REAL ESTATE
May 15, 2005 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
Architect Lloyd Wright, the son of icon Frank Lloyd Wright, designed and built this Los Feliz home in 1928 for Hollywood business manager Louis Samuel. The four-story home, made of steel and concrete grout as a variation on the concrete-block system, was sold in 1931 to silent screen star Ramon Novarro. He hired Wright to create a music room and add a pergola and a walled garden. From then on, the property has been called the Samuel-Novarro House, although Novarro sold the house in the '40s.
MAGAZINE
October 14, 1990
Regarding reader response to "Joshing Around," by Karen Stabiner: Having worked as a lead carpenter for 20 years throughout the western United States, I have had the opportunity to physically create what an architect has drawn. I have built homes, hotels, retreats and restaurants for licensed architects and engineers, barns for farmers and dream homes for fledgling yuppies. Last year I had the opportunity to work with the celebrated, yet maligned, Josh Schweitzer on the creation of Campanile restaurant.
MAGAZINE
July 8, 1990 | KAREN STABINER, Contributing editor Karen Stabiner lives in a house with a second floor designed by Schweitzer.
WHEN HE WAS a child, there was plenty of space: Josh Schweitzer's early Midwestern memories include a lush, untouched ravine hard by a babbling brook, rolling rural vistas that met the sky uninterrupted and a rambling wreck of an outsized colonial mansion with too many rooms, too many fireplaces and an abandoned barn out back for him, his brother and sister to play in. Now the only room to move is in his imagination.
MAGAZINE
August 6, 2000 | ED LEIBOWITZ
"We lost the dog for a while," Josh Schweitzer admits. The architectural designer of Hollywood's new avocado-hued Greyhound bus terminal on Cahuenga Boulevard had persuaded the company to retain the neon mascot that graced the former location at DeLongpre Avenue and Vine Street. Then, toward the end of construction, Greyhound started hedging. "Look at it," Schweitzer told them. "It's the one thing you have to sell your customers: the nostalgia of bus culture."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1990
Steven Ehrlich: "The old restaurant in Union Station. It's a wonderful space and ready to go. Second, a cafe in the main atrium of the Bradbury Building, one of my favorite spaces in all of L.A. Also: It would be great to have a wonderful restaurant overlooking the Sepulveda Dam in the Valley with an old, sculptural long vista. You'd have to make a journey to get there and it would be worth it.
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