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Josh Sides

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan
Two weeks after being sworn in as mayor of Los Angeles, Eric Garcetti is facing the first big test of his leadership skills as he responds to outbreaks of vandalism and violence in the aftermath of George Zimmerman's acquittal in the killing of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin. Garcetti stepped before a bank of news cameras on a lawn outside Dorsey High School in South Los Angeles on Tuesday and immediately made clear his solidarity with peaceful protesters, saying that they had "gathered to exercise beautifully their 1st Amendment rights.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan
Two weeks after being sworn in as mayor of Los Angeles, Eric Garcetti is facing the first big test of his leadership skills as he responds to outbreaks of vandalism and violence in the aftermath of George Zimmerman's acquittal in the killing of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin. Garcetti stepped before a bank of news cameras on a lawn outside Dorsey High School in South Los Angeles on Tuesday and immediately made clear his solidarity with peaceful protesters, saying that they had "gathered to exercise beautifully their 1st Amendment rights.
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BOOKS
September 5, 2004 | Bill Boyarsky, Bill Boyarsky, a former Times city editor, columnist and political reporter, is writing a book on the late political leader Jesse M. Unruh and the growth of California after World War II.
I was raised an anti-Communist, a child of the Cold War. A friend broke off a teenage correspondence when I criticized her for demonstrating against the execution of the Rosenbergs, convicted spies for the Soviet Union. When I was a young reporter, Dorothy Healey, a famed local Communist Party leader, told me her recollections of former Mayor Sam Yorty's party ties. I didn't trust her enough to use them.
BOOKS
September 5, 2004 | Bill Boyarsky, Bill Boyarsky, a former Times city editor, columnist and political reporter, is writing a book on the late political leader Jesse M. Unruh and the growth of California after World War II.
I was raised an anti-Communist, a child of the Cold War. A friend broke off a teenage correspondence when I criticized her for demonstrating against the execution of the Rosenbergs, convicted spies for the Soviet Union. When I was a young reporter, Dorothy Healey, a famed local Communist Party leader, told me her recollections of former Mayor Sam Yorty's party ties. I didn't trust her enough to use them.
OPINION
May 31, 2004
Re "Safe in War, Sailor Slain at L.A. Club," May 26: The tragic murder of Brian Butler Jr. should remind readers of the unbearable costs of our war on terror as well as the narrowness of our definition of terror. As Congress approves billions of dollars to secure the streets of Fallouja in Iraq, 9th and Florence avenues remain as deadly as ever. No one should be so naive to think that simply throwing money at South L.A.'s myriad problems would create an inner-city utopia. But any reasonable person can see that if even a tiny fraction of the mounting cost of our Iraq war were devoted to improving the quality of housing, education and healthcare -- and increasing the presence of law enforcement -- the streets of South L.A. and the hundreds of U.S. communities like it would be far safer.
MAGAZINE
January 11, 2004 | MICHAEL T. JARVIS
You wouldn't know it from rap lyrics, but for many African Americans in the 1950s, a South-Central Los Angeles enclave such as Compton was a city of dreams. "Blacks transformed this city in ways that people don't recognize." says Cal Poly Pomona history professor Josh Sides, author of "L.A. City Limits: African American Los Angeles from the Great Depression to the Present," newly published by University of California Press.
OPINION
September 3, 2003
Re "U.S. Presses for Aid to Iraq, but Few Give -- or Give In," Aug. 31: If ever there was proof that Americans get angry about the wrong things, it was there, on Sunday's front page. Although the "Target of Anger" is Gov. Gray Davis, the untenability of our plan to rebuild Iraq seems to escape mainstream censure. It is bad enough that we sent young Americans to Iraq under suspect pretenses and left them there, badly outnumbered, so that they might find something to justify their presence there in the first place.
NEWS
August 7, 2004 | Josh Sides
The opening of a Starbucks in Compton last month -- the product of a joint venture between the ubiquitous coffee giant and Magic Johnson's Johnson Development Corp. -- is far more than another attempt to reach "urban markets" in this nation's poorest minority communities. It might very well be a blueprint for a new way of thinking about inner-city revitalization, one that emphasizes the importance of cultivating civic discourse as much as it does job growth.
MAGAZINE
October 8, 2006 | Rick Wartzman
Ask people to identify the most iconic intersection in L.A., and you're apt to get the same response: Hollywood and Vine. But I'd like to posit an alternative about 15 miles south: Florence and Central. It's a curious choice, I'll admit. Because this corner sits in South Los Angeles, it remains "a blank spot, a no man's land" for most city residents, as Lynell George writes in her elegiac essay on the stereotyping of people and place ("What it Is. [And What it Was.]," page 14).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Bobbie Lee Holmes, a Los Angeles public school teacher who won an early victory for fair housing in California when she and her husband used the courts to challenge the racism of their Pacoima neighbors, died Sept.19 in Petaluma. She was 84. The cause was complications from heart and kidney disease, said her son, Emory Holmes II. In 1959, Holmes and her husband, Emory, moved with their three children from an integrated neighborhood on the east side of Pacoima to an all-white section a few miles away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2005 | Carla Rivera and Hector Becerra, Times Staff Writers
At Inglewood's Faithful Central Bible Church, parishioners called out names of the missing and prayed for fortitude and God's grace. At Holy Name of Jesus Catholic Church in the Jefferson Park neighborhood, they sang soaring hymns. At a Creole restaurant in Baldwin Hills, they sought the familiar aroma and taste of gumbo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2008 | Jill Leovy, Times Staff Writer
Their name, the Businessmen, was derived from the slang term "taking care of business." They were among several dominant African American gangs -- the Slausons, the Gladiators, the Del Vikings -- in the early 1960s in the neighborhood then known as South-Central: the precursors to the Bloods and the Crips. Now, the Businessmen of South Park have traded their fedoras for bifocals, and their whiskers are gray.
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