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Joshua Bell

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FOOD
February 2, 2012 | By Russ Parsons, Los Angeles Times
Joshua Bell is such a poster boy for his generation of classical musicians that fans tend to know pretty much everything about him: His background as a violin prodigy. His youthful good looks and floppy brown hair. His penchant for boundary breaking - recording movie soundtracks and playing with jazz and even bluegrass artists. His $4-million Stradivarius. Here's one thing that might surprise them, though: The dude can eat. And not in the fueling, eat-to-live kind of way. Watching him work through a tasting menu like the one served last week at lunch at the Bazaar by José Andrés was to see someone in full thrall of the pleasure of dining.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
The news from the Hollywood Bowl this week might have been that Ludovic Morlot is guest conductor. Last fall, the 38-year-old Frenchman blew into the Pacific Northwest like a blast of fresh symphonic air. As the new music director of the Seattle Symphony, he added a heady mix of work by young local composers and progressive pop to a traditional menu of classics. He also has just begun as music director of La Monnaie, Brussels' importantly venturesome opera company. He thus seems the perfect fusion chef to turn the amphitheater into a proper mixing Bowl, and there was some of that in the program Tuesday night (to be repeated on Thursday)
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Grammy Award-winning violinist Joshua Bell, 42, returns to the Hollywood Bowl on Thursday with a program of Mahler and Bruch. The boyish classical superstar talked about music, friends and adrenalin rushes from his home in New York. You've done a lot of TV, like VH1, and film, and I'm wondering whether you're consciously trying to bring more young people into the classical music fold. Yes. It's hard to say what my main motivation is, but I'm definitely conscious of trying wherever I can to bring young people in, whether it's doing "Sesame Street" or going into schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
So what would Beethoven drive? I'm not sure that putting anyone that headstrong behind the wheel would be a great idea. He'd likely scream at his publisher on his cellphone while driving, impatiently tailgate, cut people off. He'd speed for sure and never, ever signal. But Orange County is car country and Thursday night at the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, Joshua Bell handed over the keys of his new Porsche to the composer for a high-octane spin of his "Coriolan" Overture, Violin Concerto and Fourth Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
So what would Beethoven drive? I'm not sure that putting anyone that headstrong behind the wheel would be a great idea. He'd likely scream at his publisher on his cellphone while driving, impatiently tailgate, cut people off. He'd speed for sure and never, ever signal. But Orange County is car country and Thursday night at the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, Joshua Bell handed over the keys of his new Porsche to the composer for a high-octane spin of his "Coriolan" Overture, Violin Concerto and Fourth Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1989 | JOHN HENKEN
An orchestral program of Mozart, Richard Strauss and Brahms sounds about as predictable and familiar as possible. From these composers, however, Andre Previn drew a curious and audacious agenda for the Los Angeles Philharmonic on Thursday evening at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The concert began with a small contingent of strings and timpani, huddled together in the middle of an otherwise empty stage. Their employment? The "Serenata Notturna" by Mozart, K.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1986 | MARC SHULGOLD
The last time Los Angeles heard Joshua Bell in a concert setting, his vehicle was Tchaikovsky's D-major Concerto. That was 1984, with the Pasadena Symphony. This week, the young Indiana-based violinist--he's now 18--returns, on this occasion making his Los Angeles Philharmonic/Hollywood Bowl debut on Wednesday as the orchestra opens a preseason week of concerts in Cahuenga Pass. Bell's solo vehicle on this occasion? Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto. Again. But, he says, things won't be the same.
NEWS
May 3, 2001
Joshua Bell has the looks to be a superstar. People magazine named him one of the "50 Most Beautiful People in the World" and Glamour called him one of the six "It Men of the Millennium." But Bell does not appear in the movies (except as a body double, and not because of his hunk status), has no recordings on the pop charts and does not tread down fashion runways. He's a classical violinist whose work has garnered critical praise around the globe.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2004 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Fans of charismatic violinist Joshua Bell and fans of the movies came together at the Los Angeles Philharmonic concert Thursday in Walt Disney Concert Hall as Bell played the West Coast premiere of John Corigliano's Concerto for Violin and Orchestra ("The Red Violin"). The program, led by associate conductor Miguel Harth-Bedoya, also included works by Bernstein and Elgar.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2001 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Violinist Joshua Bell has lots going for him: great playing, awards, recordings and matinee idol looks. People Magazine named him one of the "50 Most Beautiful People in the World" and Glamour called him one of the six "It Men of the Millennium." But the 33-year-old violinist, who plays Brahms' Violin Concerto in D with the Pacific Symphony on Wednesday and Thursday, also keeps his brain in high gear.
FOOD
February 2, 2012 | By Russ Parsons, Los Angeles Times
Joshua Bell is such a poster boy for his generation of classical musicians that fans tend to know pretty much everything about him: His background as a violin prodigy. His youthful good looks and floppy brown hair. His penchant for boundary breaking - recording movie soundtracks and playing with jazz and even bluegrass artists. His $4-million Stradivarius. Here's one thing that might surprise them, though: The dude can eat. And not in the fueling, eat-to-live kind of way. Watching him work through a tasting menu like the one served last week at lunch at the Bazaar by José Andrés was to see someone in full thrall of the pleasure of dining.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2011
MOVIES "The Terrys" The mind-warping Sundance short by cult comedy duo Tim Heidecker and Eric Wareheim premieres in Los Angeles, along with "I'm Having a Difficult Time Killing My Parents" and "Worst Enemy. " Cinefamily , 611 N. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles. 8 p.m. $8/free for members. (323) 655-2510. http://www.cinefamily.org BOOKS Trevor Paglen The social scientist, artist, writer and provocateur, who has been exploring the secret activities of the U.S. military and intelligence agencies for the last eight years, presents and discusses his long-awaited photographic monograph, "Invisible: Covert Operations and Classified Landscapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Grammy Award-winning violinist Joshua Bell, 42, returns to the Hollywood Bowl on Thursday with a program of Mahler and Bruch. The boyish classical superstar talked about music, friends and adrenalin rushes from his home in New York. You've done a lot of TV, like VH1, and film, and I'm wondering whether you're consciously trying to bring more young people into the classical music fold. Yes. It's hard to say what my main motivation is, but I'm definitely conscious of trying wherever I can to bring young people in, whether it's doing "Sesame Street" or going into schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2009 | Richard S. Ginell
In 2007, superstar violinist Joshua Bell made some news by agreeing to an endearing little stunt now immortalized on YouTube. He set up shop in a Washington, D.C., Metro station with case open and played, just to see if anyone would notice that a world-class fiddler -- as opposed to your average everyday busker -- was serenading them. Hardly anyone did. That says more about the hurried, harried American lifestyle and the marginalization of classical music in our culture than anything about Bell's abilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
Bramwell Tovey conducted "Petrushka" at the Hollywood Bowl on Tuesday night. But before he did, the principal guest conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic for its summer concerts explained that Stravinsky kills off the eponymous puppet in his 1911 ballet by having a percussionist throw a tambourine down on a wooden table. Tovey said he had instructed a camera to pan to said tambourine and table at the appropriate moment so everyone would see them on the Bowl's video screens. What he may not have understood is that he also gave some in the audience their exit cues.
NEWS
August 19, 2004 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Violinist Joshua Bell and conductor Marin Alsop made a hit team in the Los Angeles Philharmonic program Tuesday at the Hollywood Bowl. The violinist proved a passionate and charismatic advocate of Brahms' beloved Concerto in D, which opened the two-part concert. After intermission, Alsop led a strong, dynamic performance of Shostakovich's heroic Symphony No. 5.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2009 | Richard S. Ginell
In 2007, superstar violinist Joshua Bell made some news by agreeing to an endearing little stunt now immortalized on YouTube. He set up shop in a Washington, D.C., Metro station with case open and played, just to see if anyone would notice that a world-class fiddler -- as opposed to your average everyday busker -- was serenading them. Hardly anyone did. That says more about the hurried, harried American lifestyle and the marginalization of classical music in our culture than anything about Bell's abilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1991 | RICHARD S. GINELL
Joshua Bell apologized for being late to the phone, having just stepped into his Soho apartment after hurtling down a New York street on foot on the way home from the barber. It was, in a sense, a fitting episode in the life of this young, good-looking, one-time Wunderkind of the violin, now a seasoned artist at 23 with six CDs under his belt and a crowded concert calendar. Bell doesn't mind the hectic pace; indeed, he claims to enjoy the lifestyle of a globe-trotting virtuoso.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2004 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Fans of charismatic violinist Joshua Bell and fans of the movies came together at the Los Angeles Philharmonic concert Thursday in Walt Disney Concert Hall as Bell played the West Coast premiere of John Corigliano's Concerto for Violin and Orchestra ("The Red Violin"). The program, led by associate conductor Miguel Harth-Bedoya, also included works by Bernstein and Elgar.
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