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May 9, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
U.S. officials acknowledged Monday that a Navy warplane carrying a hydrogen bomb rolled off the deck of an aircraft carrier in 1965 and sank in the ocean 70 miles from Okinawa. The plane, the pilot and the weapon--lost in 16,200 feet of water off the Japanese island--have never been recovered. The incident, the most serious involving nuclear weapons in the Navy's history, provides evidence that U.S. warplanes operating off Vietnam were loaded with nuclear bombs and that U.S. warships carried atomic weapons into Japanese ports in violation of Japanese policy, according to two researchers who uncovered the information.
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NEWS
May 9, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
U.S. officials acknowledged Monday that a Navy warplane carrying a hydrogen bomb rolled off the deck of an aircraft carrier in 1965 and sank in the ocean 70 miles from Okinawa. The plane, the pilot and the weapon--lost in 16,200 feet of water off the Japanese island--have never been recovered. The incident, the most serious involving nuclear weapons in the Navy's history, provides evidence that U.S. warplanes operating off Vietnam were loaded with nuclear bombs and that U.S. warships carried atomic weapons into Japanese ports in violation of Japanese policy, according to two researchers who uncovered the information.
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NEWS
May 25, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
A 1975 collision between two U.S. Navy ships in the Mediterranean triggered fires and explosions within 40 feet of nuclear weapons aboard one of the ships, two public interest groups charged Wednesday. The commander of the Navy task force in the Mediterranean classified the incident as the most dangerous kind--what the Navy calls a "broken arrow" accident, one involving the possibility of detonation of nuclear weapons, the groups said. They said that the Navy covered up the accident report, which was submitted by Adm. Eugene Carroll, then commander of the U.S. Navy's Task Force 60. A copy of Carroll's secret report was obtained and released to the press by the environmental group Greenpeace and the Washington-based Institute for Policy Studies, which plan to release a comprehensive report on naval accidents early next month.
NEWS
October 22, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yielding to protests from Japan and the United States, Russia agreed Thursday to stop dumping liquid radioactive waste into the Sea of Japan but warned that it will resume the practice unless richer countries help it process the waste for underground burial. Environment Minister Viktor Danilov-Danilyan announced the decision after a Cabinet meeting. He said Russia will refrain from further dumping "in the near future."
NEWS
September 2, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was about three years ago in this ramshackle Siberian farming and mink-breeding town that the Yellow Children began to appear. After hospital treatment, the jaundice that turns some newborns here a dull yellow eventually disappears. But it is not their only problem, for these infants also show signs of congenital defects in their nervous system and organs. They begin to walk later than other children, are oddly silent and have a vocabulary that remains infantile far too long, doctors say.
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