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Joshua Tree National Monument

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1993 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The body of a hiker from Mission Viejo, whose wife reported him missing over the weekend, has been found in Joshua Tree National Monument. Michael John O'Connor, 46, had been attending a Chrysler Corp. seminar in Indian Wells on Friday and had bought a ticket to hike to the monument afterward, the Riverside County Sheriff's Department said. When he did not come home Saturday, his wife, Dorothy, reported him missing to Riverside County officials.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A magnitude 5.0 earthquake, the strongest aftershock of the 1992 Landers quake in nearly a year, struck before dawn Sunday in a sparsely populated, mountainous area of Joshua Tree National Park above Desert Hot Springs. No damage or injury reports were received after the 4:03 a.m. temblor, the Riverside County Sheriff's Department said. It was centered 15 miles northeast of Palm Springs and four miles south of the epicenter of the 6.
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NEWS
August 29, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many urban Southern California residents, the Eagle Mountain waste-by-rail plan makes sense: Reduce the need for local landfills by shipping 25% of the region's trash on trains and trucks to an abandoned open pit almost 200 miles east of Los Angeles. But to many desert farmers and affluent Palm Springs-area residents, it is a proposal from hell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1993 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The body of a hiker from Mission Viejo, whose wife reported him missing over the weekend, has been found in Joshua Tree National Monument. Michael John O'Connor, 46, had been attending a Chrysler Corp. seminar in Indian Wells on Friday and had bought a ticket to hike to the monument afterward, the Riverside County Sheriff's Department said. When he did not come home Saturday, his wife, Dorothy, reported him missing to Riverside County officials.
NEWS
January 22, 1989
The grandfather of Laura Bradbury, the 3-year-old girl who vanished in 1984 from a family campsite at Joshua Tree National Monument, angrily disputed a televised report that skull fragments found in the Morongo Basin were from the missing child. "Baloney!" Dana Winters said. "Don't you think . . . they would have notified the parents?" he asked, adding that no laboratory has contacted Laura's family.
NEWS
March 31, 1986
A thorough search of an area of Joshua Tree National Monument where parts of a child's skull were found has yielded no clues of value, and officials said they are not planning any more searches. San Bernardino County authorities said three bone chips found over the weekend were so small they were of "no evidentiary significance."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1988
It's unfortunate that the majority of voters in California do not use the desert; if they did I think that even Cranston wouldn't be pushing so hard for his bill. The majority of people opposing this bill are either recreational users, live in or near the desert or make a living from it. I agree that preservation of selected areas of California for wilderness is desirable; however just closing off large portions of the desert, which are now being used, does not make a whole lot of sense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1992 | NONA YATES
The native desert plants of Joshua Tree National Monument will be the subject of a field trip to the area sponsored by the California Native Plant Society Friday through Sunday. Participants will learn about the vegetation of the arid region in a visit to the Cottonwood Canyon and the Lost Palms Oasis on weekend outings. Space is limited; call (310) 472-5464.
NEWS
July 19, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Ooh! Ooh! Ooh!" yelled Michaela Kratochwil as she retreated from the cactus patch. "I have never been bitten by a plant in Germany," sighed the 23-year-old woman as her friend Andrea Seyferth, 27, gingerly pulled a teddy bear cholla cactus spine from Kratochwil's foot. The two West German university students are spending the summer working as volunteers at this national monument on the Mojave Desert 155 miles east of Los Angeles.
NEWS
October 7, 1992 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The Riverside County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved plans to build what could become the nation's largest garbage dump, near the border of a national monument. Voting 3 to 2, the supervisors cleared the way for the project's sponsors to seek landfill permits from state water and air quality agencies to construct a landfill located about a mile and a half from scenic Joshua Tree National Monument.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | PETER H. KING
First came the real estate signs. Planted in the sand every 50 yards or so, each touted a priced-to-move patch of barren sage land. Then came the town--a collection of low-slung cinder-block storefronts, barely enough to justify a small dot on the road map. I noticed an unusual proliferation of Ross Perot posters and a bumper sticker that warned: "I Brake for Hallucinations." Clearly, this was Joshua Tree.
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A strong aftershock, magnitude 4.8, struck an area near the epicenter of the Joshua Tree earthquake near Desert Hot Springs on Monday morning, continuing what a Caltech scientist called "a rich aftershock sequence" that has followed the 6.1 main shock nearly four weeks ago. Felt strongly in Palm Springs, mildly in parts of Los Angeles and as far away as Santa Catalina Island, the 8:44 a.m. shaker was as powerful as any aftershock of the April 22 temblor. No new damage or injuries were reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1992 | NONA YATES
The native desert plants of Joshua Tree National Monument will be the subject of a field trip to the area sponsored by the California Native Plant Society Friday through Sunday. Participants will learn about the vegetation of the arid region in a visit to the Cottonwood Canyon and the Lost Palms Oasis on weekend outings. Space is limited; call (310) 472-5464.
NEWS
October 18, 1991 | PATRICK MOTT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the sweltering evening darkness last week, several dozen grim people were shuffling into the Westminster Civic Center to play out the latest chapter in a tragedy. Their faces were ghostly and somber in the glow of the candles they carried, and the flickering light fell on several posters and T-shirts bearing the likeness of the 11-year-old girl they were there to try to save. They had gathered to keep alive the search for Jaycee Lee Dugard, formerly of Garden Grove, who was abducted a few blocks from her South Lake Tahoe home June 10 as she walked to a school bus stop.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many urban Southern California residents, the Eagle Mountain waste-by-rail plan makes sense: Reduce the need for local landfills by shipping 25% of the region's trash on trains and trucks to an abandoned open pit almost 200 miles east of Los Angeles. But to many desert farmers and affluent Palm Springs-area residents, it is a proposal from hell.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to ship 25% of Southern California's trash by train to a new desert landfill in Riverside County could have a significant impact on air quality at nearby Joshua Tree National Monument, according to a draft environmental impact statement released Monday. "Increases of nitrogen oxides . . . may worsen ozone concentrations within Joshua Tree," states the report, citing concerns of the National Park Service. " . . .
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | PETER H. KING
First came the real estate signs. Planted in the sand every 50 yards or so, each touted a priced-to-move patch of barren sage land. Then came the town--a collection of low-slung cinder-block storefronts, barely enough to justify a small dot on the road map. I noticed an unusual proliferation of Ross Perot posters and a bumper sticker that warned: "I Brake for Hallucinations." Clearly, this was Joshua Tree.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to ship 25% of Southern California's trash by train to a new desert landfill in Riverside County could have a significant impact on air quality at nearby Joshua Tree National Monument, according to a draft environmental impact statement released Monday. "Increases of nitrogen oxides . . . may worsen ozone concentrations within Joshua Tree," states the report, citing concerns of the National Park Service. " . . .
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