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Joshua Trees

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SCIENCE
April 11, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Extensive stands of Joshua Tree National Park's peculiar namesake plants are festooned with clumps of white and yellow flowers that are drawing tourists eager to take in the scenery before the bloom wilts in the harsh desert sun. “It's one of the most prolific blooms we've seen in recent years,” interpretive park ranger Bret Greenheck said. “The bloom peaked a week ago at lower elevations, but trees on higher groundare still producing flowers.” “Some biologists think Joshua Trees bloom like this in response to stressful conditions such as drought,” Greenheck said.
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TRAVEL
April 27, 2014
PAPUA NEW GUINEA Slide show Pierre Odier will share his insights on Papua New Guinea, one of the last places where primitive man can still be seen in his natural Stone Age environment. When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday at Distant Lands, 20 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Admission, info: Free. RSVP to (626) 449-3220. WOMEN Workshop Hostelling International will conduct a workshop for women interested in traveling alone. Topics to be covered include health and safety.
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TRAVEL
April 8, 2012
I enjoyed the article featuring Joshua Tree National Park and the Gateway Communities ["Between Rocks and a Hot Place," March 25, by Christopher Reynolds] until it became apparent that the writer erased the town of Yucca Valley from existence. I'm certain he noticed the town. He had to drive right through it on his way to Joshua Tree and to Pioneertown. He probably even filled up your car at one of our gas stations. But what he missed (and what your readers missed) were mention of the High Desert Nature Museum, Desert Christ Park, Old Town Yucca Valley and any of the 10 or so lodging opportunities in the town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Elaine Woo
When Adrianne Wadewitz became a Wikipedia contributor 10 years ago she decided to use a pseudonym, certain that fellow scholars at Indiana University would frown on writing for the often-maligned "free encyclopedia that anyone can edit. " But Wadewitz eventually came out as a Wikipedian, the term the encyclopedia uses to describe the tens of thousands of volunteers who write and edit its pages. A rarity as a woman in the male-centric Wikipedia universe, she became one of its most valued and prolific contributors as well as a force for diversifying its ranks and demystifying its inner workings.
NEWS
March 12, 1988 | JOHN McKINNEY
With the exception of pathfinder John C. Fremont, who called them "the most repulsive tree in the vegetable kingdom," most California travelers have found Joshua trees to be quite picturesque. Mormon pioneers thought that the tree's outstretched limbs and bearded appearance resembled the prophet Joshua pointing the way to the promised land. The Joshuas have burst into an early bloom, and any doubts about the tree's beauty will vanish if you walk among them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1990 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than three years of debate and delay, Palmdale has again stalled a plan to require preservation of native Joshua trees, a palm-like desert symbol that gave the city its name. Although developers steadfastly fought the preservation ordinance in the past, they now say they are satisfied with the measure. But homeowner groups and community leaders called for a delay this week, complaining that the city had yet to obtain land where trees saved from building sites could be stored.
NEWS
March 24, 1986
San Bernardino County officials have vowed to prosecute the persons responsible for illegally bulldozing 449 Joshua trees in the high desert community of Yucca Valley, about 30 miles north of Palm Springs. The mass destruction occurred in violation of county ordinances protecting the trees, and unleashed a flood of complaints from local residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1990
A 560-acre forest of Joshua trees west of Lancaster, the legacy of an Antelope Valley rancher who collected guns, railway memorabilia and acres of desert land, has been acquired by the state and will become part of a nearby public park, officials said Monday. The forest is one of the area's largest concentrations of Joshua trees. In a transaction that was finally completed in recent weeks, land was willed to the state by rancher Arthur Ripley, who died two years ago at the age of 88.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1993
A 22.5-acre parcel of land once considered a possible Joshua tree preserve has been given to the Lancaster redevelopment agency. The redevelopment agency is negotiating with a developer interested in buying some of the property. The agency voted to acquire the property from the city for $1.27 million. The city originally purchased the vacant land, without having it appraised, for $1.1 million in December, 1991, from Joseph Rivani, a land investor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1994 | Researched by SHARON MOESER / For The Times
In the high desert, the Joshua tree is among the most prominent and enduring forms of native vegetation. Large specimens average 30 feet tall, with one giant in Lancaster measured at 58 feet and estimated to be 1,000 years old. In some areas of the Antelope Valley, where many residents are fond of the gawky trees, they can be found in dense clusters spread over several acres.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Climbing routes in the northern part of Joshua Tree National Park have been closed temporarily so as not to disturb a pair of golden eagles nesting in the area. The routes in the Indian Cove area may remain shut as late as mid-June, according to the National Park Service . "The nesting pair appears to have finished constructing a nest, and this area will remain closed until the nest has been abandoned to ensure the protection of the species for the duration of the nesting activities," a park statement says.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
On a short jaunt to the desert between Christmas and New Year's Day, my friends and I (four in all, in a rented house) ran out of coffee rather precipitously. Without coffee -- strong coffee --how are you going to ever get up for an early morning hike in the park? We had a four-cup French press with us, and I didn't relish trying to make some decent joe in that with a can of Folger's from the general market. Bingo! At the farmers market in town that Saturday morning, we found a stand where Royce Robertson and his wife, Ikeke, were selling fresh, certified organic coffee beans.
SCIENCE
December 13, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
In recent years, California's Agassiz's desert tortoise population has been decimated by shootings, residential and commercial development, vehicle traffic, respiratory disease and predation by ravens, dogs and coyotes. Now, dwindling populations of the reptiles with scruffy carapaces and skin as tough as rhino hide are facing an even greater threat: longer droughts spurred by climate change in their Sonoran Desert kingdom of arroyos and burrows, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study.
TRAVEL
December 2, 2013
WILDLIFE Slide show Carl Palazzolo, wildlife veterinarian, conservationist and photographer, will share his wildlife and conservation work around the world, as well as his Africa safari pictures in a 90-minute slide show. When, where: 7 p.m. Tuesday at Brix Wine & New York Deli, 16635 Pacific Coast Highway, Sunset Beach. Admission, info: Free. (562) 592-3167. First-come basis. SAFETY Workshop Experts will explain where and why avalanches occur.
NEWS
November 14, 2013 | By Anne Harnagel
It's easy to spot heavenly bodies in SoCal -- just check out the beach or your local gym -- but heavenly bodies of the celestial kind, well, not so much. That's where Joshua Tree National Park and its dark night skies can help. It is partnering with Celestron Telescopes , NASA, American Park Network and the Joshua Tree National Park Assn . to host a stargazing event for the public on Nov. 23 from 6:30 to 10 p.m. As part of "My Night Sky," stargazers will learn about the night sky from local experts and use a variety of telescopes from the most basic to high-powered computerized models.
NEWS
November 2, 2013 | By Ken Schwencke
A shallow magnitude 3.2 earthquake was reported Saturday morning 39 miles from Joshua Tree, Calif., according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The temblor occurred at 11:23 a.m. Pacific time at a depth of 0.6 miles. The epicenter was 40 miles from Twentynine Palms, Calif., 40 miles from Yucca Valley, Calif., 43 miles from Barstow, Calif., and 256 miles from Phoenix, according to the USGS. In the last 10 days, there have been no earthquakes magnitude 3.0 or greater centered nearby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster has taken the first step toward creating a 30-acre Joshua tree preserve on the city's west side by purchasing 22.5 acres from a developer for $1.1 million, city officials said Thursday. In coming months, the city plans to fence the land bought from developer Joseph Rivani. The city also hopes to install some parking and buy the remaining 7.5 acres from three other owners, city Parks Director Lyle Norton said.
TRAVEL
October 20, 2013
AFRICA Presentation Pierre Odier will discuss his recent journey to Gabon, visiting Dr. Albert Schweitzer Hospital, finding a remote pygmy tribe and being initiated into another (nonpygmy) tribe. When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday at Distant Lands, 20 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Admission, info: Free. RSVP to (626) 449-3220. HIKING Workshop Experts will offer tips on planning a day hike to see fall colors, including local resources and places to go. When, where: 7 p.m. Wednesday at the REI stores in Rancho Cucamonga, 12218 Foothill Blvd., and Tustin, 2962 El Camino Real.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
Officials at Joshua Tree National Park announced Thursday that the park reopened in time for what is typically its busiest season. The park was one of 401 national parks and monuments nationwide that were being opened after the budget deal to end the federal government shutdown. "We are excited and happy to be back at work and welcome visitors," Joshua Tree Supt. Mark Butler said in a statement. All park visitor centers -- Joshua Tree, Oasis, Black Rock and Cottonwood -- were opened by noon Thursday, officials said.
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