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Josias Kumpf

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NATIONAL
March 20, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A former guard at a Nazi concentration camp was deported from Racine to Austria, despite objections from his lawyer that the guard was simply present at the camp and that he committed no acts of persecution. Prosecutors said Josias Kumpf, now 83, was a guard at the Sachsenhausen concentration camp in Germany, the Trawniki labor camp in Nazi-occupied Poland, and slave labor sites in occupied France. U.S. investigators alleged that in 1943 he helped shoot 8,000 Jews in Trawniki in a single day.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2009 | By Duke Helfand
The United States has secured more legal victories against suspected Nazi war criminals than any other country over the last eight years, but progress has slowed over the last year, according to a Jewish human rights organization in Los Angeles. The Simon Wiesenthal Center said in a new report that U.S. authorities have been responsible for 37 of 82 legal actions against suspected Nazis worldwide since 2001, when the organization began keeping statistics. The center's chief Nazi hunter, Efraim Zuroff, who graded more than three dozen countries on their efforts to prosecute Nazis, gave the United States an A despite a falloff in deportations and new investigations in the latest annual evaluation.
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NATIONAL
June 17, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal appeals board has upheld a deportation order for a Wisconsin man who was a Nazi concentration camp guard during World War II. The federal Board of Immigration Appeals upheld a deportation order issued in January 2007 against Josias Kumpf, 83, of Racine, who was at the Trawniki training camp in Nazi-occupied Poland and the Sachsenhausen concentration camp near Berlin. Last year's deportation order, issued by Chicago-based immigration Judge Jennie L. Giambastiani, called for Kumpf's removal to Germany, Austria or Serbia.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A former guard at a Nazi concentration camp was deported from Racine to Austria, despite objections from his lawyer that the guard was simply present at the camp and that he committed no acts of persecution. Prosecutors said Josias Kumpf, now 83, was a guard at the Sachsenhausen concentration camp in Germany, the Trawniki labor camp in Nazi-occupied Poland, and slave labor sites in occupied France. U.S. investigators alleged that in 1943 he helped shoot 8,000 Jews in Trawniki in a single day.
OPINION
July 19, 2005
Re "A Nazi's Day of Judgment," Column One, July 12 As a refugee from Nazi Germany, I too am disturbed by your article on Josias Kumpf. But what disturbs me is not what this 19-year-old conscript may -- or may not -- have seen or done shortly after his arrival at the scene of the massacre; that is between him and his conscience. What deeply disturbs me is that an American judge concluded that Kumpf's mere presence at Trawniki meant he "personally advocated or assisted" in the massacre.
OPINION
July 15, 2005
Re "A Nazi's Day of Judgment," Column One, July 12: I think it is a travesty that more cannot be done for Josias Kumpf. An old man is being held guilty for events that happened more than a generation ago. Even if he didn't participate in the mass murder of a single group of people, as he says, he must still live with the memory of so many being killed before his eyes, something that no legal proceeding or punishment can emulate. And if we can be forgiving of a former Nazi conscript named Joseph Ratzinger [now Pope Benedict XVI]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2009 | By Duke Helfand
The United States has secured more legal victories against suspected Nazi war criminals than any other country over the last eight years, but progress has slowed over the last year, according to a Jewish human rights organization in Los Angeles. The Simon Wiesenthal Center said in a new report that U.S. authorities have been responsible for 37 of 82 legal actions against suspected Nazis worldwide since 2001, when the organization began keeping statistics. The center's chief Nazi hunter, Efraim Zuroff, who graded more than three dozen countries on their efforts to prosecute Nazis, gave the United States an A despite a falloff in deportations and new investigations in the latest annual evaluation.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2007 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
A federal immigration judge has ordered the removal of a retired Wisconsin sausage maker who slipped into this country half a century ago by hiding his past as a Nazi prison camp guard, authorities said Thursday. Josias Kumpf was the 100th former Nazi in the U.S. to be prosecuted by the Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations.
NATIONAL
July 12, 2005 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
Two government lawyers knocked at the door of a brick, ranch-style house here two years ago and, getting no answer, wandered around back. There they found an old man sitting alone on a patio chair. He wore a cap to shield himself from the afternoon sun. He noticed that one of the lawyers was pregnant, and he cleaned off another chair. Sit down, he said. Josias Kumpf had been living in the United States for nearly half a century. He had been an American citizen for 40 years.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal appeals board has upheld a deportation order for a Wisconsin man who was a Nazi concentration camp guard during World War II. The federal Board of Immigration Appeals upheld a deportation order issued in January 2007 against Josias Kumpf, 83, of Racine, who was at the Trawniki training camp in Nazi-occupied Poland and the Sachsenhausen concentration camp near Berlin. Last year's deportation order, issued by Chicago-based immigration Judge Jennie L. Giambastiani, called for Kumpf's removal to Germany, Austria or Serbia.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2007 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
A federal immigration judge has ordered the removal of a retired Wisconsin sausage maker who slipped into this country half a century ago by hiding his past as a Nazi prison camp guard, authorities said Thursday. Josias Kumpf was the 100th former Nazi in the U.S. to be prosecuted by the Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations.
OPINION
July 19, 2005
Re "A Nazi's Day of Judgment," Column One, July 12 As a refugee from Nazi Germany, I too am disturbed by your article on Josias Kumpf. But what disturbs me is not what this 19-year-old conscript may -- or may not -- have seen or done shortly after his arrival at the scene of the massacre; that is between him and his conscience. What deeply disturbs me is that an American judge concluded that Kumpf's mere presence at Trawniki meant he "personally advocated or assisted" in the massacre.
OPINION
July 15, 2005
Re "A Nazi's Day of Judgment," Column One, July 12: I think it is a travesty that more cannot be done for Josias Kumpf. An old man is being held guilty for events that happened more than a generation ago. Even if he didn't participate in the mass murder of a single group of people, as he says, he must still live with the memory of so many being killed before his eyes, something that no legal proceeding or punishment can emulate. And if we can be forgiving of a former Nazi conscript named Joseph Ratzinger [now Pope Benedict XVI]
NATIONAL
July 12, 2005 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
Two government lawyers knocked at the door of a brick, ranch-style house here two years ago and, getting no answer, wandered around back. There they found an old man sitting alone on a patio chair. He wore a cap to shield himself from the afternoon sun. He noticed that one of the lawyers was pregnant, and he cleaned off another chair. Sit down, he said. Josias Kumpf had been living in the United States for nearly half a century. He had been an American citizen for 40 years.
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