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Josie Heath

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August 11, 1992 | FLORENCE WILLIAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Democrat Josie Heath said recently that voters should support her in today's Colorado Senate primary because Congress needs more women, one of her two opponents had a ready retort. "There are two women in the Senate and no Indians," said Rep. Ben Night-horse Campbell, who is half Northern Cheyenne. "So they're ahead of us by two." Campbell, the co-grand marshal of the 1992 Rose Parade, has established himself as the candidate to beat in a battle with Heath and former Gov. Richard D.
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NEWS
August 11, 1992 | FLORENCE WILLIAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Democrat Josie Heath said recently that voters should support her in today's Colorado Senate primary because Congress needs more women, one of her two opponents had a ready retort. "There are two women in the Senate and no Indians," said Rep. Ben Night-horse Campbell, who is half Northern Cheyenne. "So they're ahead of us by two." Campbell, the co-grand marshal of the 1992 Rose Parade, has established himself as the candidate to beat in a battle with Heath and former Gov. Richard D.
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NEWS
August 12, 1992 | From Associated Press
Colorado Rep. Ben Nighthorse Campbell, the only American Indian in Congress, Tuesday won a Democratic U.S. Senate primary that pitted three of Colorado's best-known politicians. In Georgia, Rep. Charles Hatcher, one of the worst abusers of the now-closed House bank, was ousted in a runoff election with state Sen. Sanford Bishop. Campbell had been considered a slight favorite in the Colorado race over former Gov. Richard D.
NEWS
October 27, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
President Bush's endorsement of term limitations for state legislators and members of Congress could reshape the politics of the issue, accelerating its transformation from a populist struggle between insiders and outsiders into a partisan battle between Democrats and Republicans, analysts say. With that possibility in sight, some leading term limit supporters expressed mixed emotions over Bush's endorsement Friday of a limit-setting initiative on the California ballot.
NEWS
September 25, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Nearly 20 years after she posed atop a North Vietnamese anti-aircraft gun, actress Jane Fonda is still caught in a political cross fire. Republican candidates this year in Texas, Colorado and Indiana have accused their Democratic opponents of insulting war veterans by accepting donations from the Hollywood Women's Political Committee, a liberal Los Angeles-based fund-raising organization to which Fonda belongs.
NEWS
October 27, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
President Bush's endorsement of term limits for state legislators and members of Congress could reshape the politics of the issue, accelerating its transformation from a populist struggle between insiders and outsiders into a partisan battle between Democrats and Republicans, analysts say. With that possibility in sight, some leading term limit supporters expressed mixed emotions over Bush's endorsement Friday of a limit-setting initiative on the California ballot.
NEWS
July 3, 1992 | BILL STALL and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hollywood provided the glitter, glamour and campaign gold at the gala of the political year, but nine women candidates for the U.S. Senate generated the energy and no-nonsense message that grabbed the audience. "This is not just an election. It is a time for justice," said Geri Rothman-Serot, a candidate for the Democratic nomination to run against Sen. Kit Bond (R-Mo.) in November. Carol Moseley Braun of Chicago, who dumped incumbent Democrat Sen.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and DWIGHT MORRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Abortion. Taxes. The budget. All were important in determining the outcome of the 1990 elections but perhaps the single most decisive factor in many campaigns was something the candidates never mentioned: How much money they had to spend. With a few notable exceptions, the results of Tuesday's election reinforced the basic tenet of American politics that well-financed incumbents are almost impossible to beat.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former official of the failed Silverado Banking, Savings & Loan Assn. said Tuesday that he knew Neil Bush was involved in a business deal with a man seeking a $900,000 line of credit at Silverado, where the President's son served as a director. Russell Murray, former senior vice president of the S&L, told a court hearing that he and Bush had at least two conversations about Bush's proposed oil company venture in Argentina with Kenneth Good, a big borrower at Silverado.
NEWS
July 2, 1990 | BETH ANN KRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The delegates were beside themselves: * The same day the National Organization for Women opened its 24th annual conference here on Friday, President Bush vetoed a bill that would have guaranteed workers in larger businesses unpaid time off to care for seriously ill family members or newborn infants.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Until recently, when folks at the Point After restaurant talked politics, they mostly groused about the budget deficit and the savings-and-loan fiasco. But the Mideast crisis has provided them with a fresh target--the high price of gasoline. "You'd better believe people here are good and sore," says Ken Beer, operator of the local Sunoco station in this east Iowa town, who has been forced to boost prices by 22 cents a gallon since the Iraqi army swept into Kuwait.
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