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Jostein Gaarder

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September 8, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a boy, author Jostein Gaarder would stare into the clear Norwegian night and ask his father the sort of existential questions that eventually pique the curiosity of most youngsters: What is behind the stars? What came before the universe? How can something be created from nothing? He plied his mother with more of life's riddles: Why do cows have calves and not, say, puppies or kittens?
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BOOKS
July 21, 1996 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
THE SOLITAIRE MYSTERY A Novel About Family and Destiny by Jostein Gaarder (Farrar Straus & Giroux. $22, 309 pp.). Here is an honest-to-goodness dream-making bedtime story for grown-ups, in the proud tradition of "Alice in Wonderland." Norwegian-born Jostein Gaarder is also the plot-meister of "Sophie's World," the 1994 novel-philosophy course that sold hundreds of thousands of copies around the world.
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NEWS
September 20, 1994 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dear Mr. Gaarder: Or would you prefer Author-God, Master of the Universe or Sir? That's some trick, using the garish rubric of a novel to publish a textbook on philosophy (yes, we all know from Newsweek and Publisher's Weekly--pretty impressive publicity for an obscure Norwegian writer--that you teach high school philosophy).
NEWS
September 20, 1994 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dear Mr. Gaarder: Or would you prefer Author-God, Master of the Universe or Sir? That's some trick, using the garish rubric of a novel to publish a textbook on philosophy (yes, we all know from Newsweek and Publisher's Weekly--pretty impressive publicity for an obscure Norwegian writer--that you teach high school philosophy).
BOOKS
July 21, 1996 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
THE SOLITAIRE MYSTERY A Novel About Family and Destiny by Jostein Gaarder (Farrar Straus & Giroux. $22, 309 pp.). Here is an honest-to-goodness dream-making bedtime story for grown-ups, in the proud tradition of "Alice in Wonderland." Norwegian-born Jostein Gaarder is also the plot-meister of "Sophie's World," the 1994 novel-philosophy course that sold hundreds of thousands of copies around the world.
BOOKS
September 13, 1998
Jill Sumner, elementary school teacher: "Sophie's World" by Jostein Gaarder (Berkley). "Gaarder presents the history of philosophy in an original way: with the story of a curious young girl. You don't have to be a philosophy lover to read this book. Told through her eyes, it's accessible to everyone." **** Judith Drury, bookseller: "Bruculinu, America" by Vincent Schiavelli (Houghton Mifflin). "This is a warm and wonderful memoir.
BOOKS
December 17, 1995 | Marina Warner, Marina Warner is the author of the recently published "From the Beast to the Blonde: On Fairy Tales and Their Tellers" (Farrar, Straus & Giroux)
The old Aristotle decided that a love of wonder was the beginning of wisdom; for this reason he loved myths, which were full of marvels. In "The Name of the Rose," Umberto Eco imagined Aristotle's lost book on laughter and managed to create a comic thriller around the philosophical issue of rationalist irony and skepticism.
NEWS
September 8, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a boy, author Jostein Gaarder would stare into the clear Norwegian night and ask his father the sort of existential questions that eventually pique the curiosity of most youngsters: What is behind the stars? What came before the universe? How can something be created from nothing? He plied his mother with more of life's riddles: Why do cows have calves and not, say, puppies or kittens?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2006 | Heller McAlpin, Special to The Times
AMERICAN historian Henry Brooks Adams famously defined philosophy as "unintelligible answers to insoluble problems." That doesn't stop the protagonist of Robert Hellenga's fourth novel, "Philosophy Made Simple," from turning to the great thinkers to try to figure out "before it was too late ... the meaning and purpose of human existence." Seven years after the death of his wife, 60-year-old Rudy Harrington still misses her terribly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2000 | ANN SHIELDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Justice can be harsh and sometimes arbitrary. You might have a hand cut off for theft under Islamic law. Or a convicted killer might escape execution by paying off the victim's family. It's called blood money, and you can read about it in Robert J. Meadows' "What Price for Blood? Murder and Justice in Saudi Arabia" (Robert D. Reed Publishers; $21.95).
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