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Joszef Antall

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NEWS
May 2, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joszef Antall, the man who will guide Hungary through the troubled waters of a new democracy, appeals to worried Hungarians with an aura of paternal authority and a commitment to restoring national pride. Like his countrymen, Antall was obliged to retreat after the failed 1956 effort to expel communism and forced to wait for the next chance, like a prisoner intent on escape.
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NEWS
October 19, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush announced a $5-billion increase in International Monetary Fund lending to Eastern Europe on Thursday as he welcomed to the White House Hungary's first democratically elected prime minister in four decades. Jozsef Antall, the latest in a series of new Eastern European democratic leaders to visit Washington, also was told by Bush that Hungary will be allowed to open a long-sought consulate in Los Angeles. During the Cold War, U.S.
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NEWS
June 7, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Joszef Antall headed Wednesday for a Warsaw Pact summit in Moscow after declaring that the Kremlin-led defense alliance has "lost its function" and should be abolished by the end of next year. Antall said the military structure of the alliance violates Hungarian sovereignty and that his government has compiled a list of grievances to air at the East Bloc gathering in the wake of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's visit to the United States.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Joszef Antall headed Wednesday for a Warsaw Pact summit in Moscow after declaring that the Kremlin-led defense alliance has "lost its function" and should be abolished by the end of next year. Antall said the military structure of the alliance violates Hungarian sovereignty and that his government has compiled a list of grievances to air at the East Bloc gathering in the wake of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's visit to the United States.
NEWS
May 4, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly elected President Arpad Goncz on Thursday asked historian Joszef Antall to form Hungary's first government of the post-Communist era. "We are taking the first steps toward creation of a new nation, and Antall is perfectly able to do this," Goncz said in praise of the man who will be Hungary's next prime minister. The selection of Antall was a formality closing the inaugural session of Parliament, which has launched a new age of democracy for this East European nation of 10.5 million.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The politics of national pride that carried Joszef Antall and his Hungarian Democratic Forum to victory reflect a conservative sweep across Eastern Europe as Moscow's former satellites realign themselves toward the West. But the center-right Forum's success in striking an anti-leftist chord in an electorate long suppressed by socialism may prove difficult to duplicate among the strong liberal and leftist opposition it will face in Parliament.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Hungary's newly elected Parliament convenes for the first time today, it will attempt to set the record straight on 40 years of thwarted history and point the nation on a course that heads directly West. By unanimous agreement among the six main parties represented in Parliament, its first action will be to rewrite history so that the failed 1956 Hungarian uprising against Soviet domination will henceforth be portrayed as a "war of independence."
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush announced a $5-billion increase in International Monetary Fund lending to Eastern Europe on Thursday as he welcomed to the White House Hungary's first democratically elected prime minister in four decades. Jozsef Antall, the latest in a series of new Eastern European democratic leaders to visit Washington, also was told by Bush that Hungary will be allowed to open a long-sought consulate in Los Angeles. During the Cold War, U.S.
NEWS
May 1, 1990
The first freely elected Hungarian Parliament in postwar history convenes Wednesday to name a new prime minister, to set the record straight on the nation's turbulent past and to chart a democratic course for the future. As leader of the Hungarian Democratic Forum, which won the most votes in the two-round elections, 58-year-old Joszef Antall is expected to be named prime minister.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign of Hungary's drift from the Kremlin's orbit, the newly elected Parliament on Wednesday applauded an opposition proposal that Hungary withdraw from the Warsaw Pact and suspend all military exercises with the alliance until the break can be formally negotiated. In another development, Defense Minister Gyorgy Karpathy confirmed reports that Hungary has sold Soviet-built MIG jets to the United States but denied that the sales disclosed any Soviet military secrets.
NEWS
May 4, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly elected President Arpad Goncz on Thursday asked historian Joszef Antall to form Hungary's first government of the post-Communist era. "We are taking the first steps toward creation of a new nation, and Antall is perfectly able to do this," Goncz said in praise of the man who will be Hungary's next prime minister. The selection of Antall was a formality closing the inaugural session of Parliament, which has launched a new age of democracy for this East European nation of 10.5 million.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joszef Antall, the man who will guide Hungary through the troubled waters of a new democracy, appeals to worried Hungarians with an aura of paternal authority and a commitment to restoring national pride. Like his countrymen, Antall was obliged to retreat after the failed 1956 effort to expel communism and forced to wait for the next chance, like a prisoner intent on escape.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Hungary's newly elected Parliament convenes for the first time today, it will attempt to set the record straight on 40 years of thwarted history and point the nation on a course that heads directly West. By unanimous agreement among the six main parties represented in Parliament, its first action will be to rewrite history so that the failed 1956 Hungarian uprising against Soviet domination will henceforth be portrayed as a "war of independence."
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The politics of national pride that carried Joszef Antall and his Hungarian Democratic Forum to victory reflect a conservative sweep across Eastern Europe as Moscow's former satellites realign themselves toward the West. But the center-right Forum's success in striking an anti-leftist chord in an electorate long suppressed by socialism may prove difficult to duplicate among the strong liberal and leftist opposition it will face in Parliament.
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter Tolgyessy, the 32-year-old wizard of the Alliance of Free Democrats, called it "the most complicated election system in the world." This was almost the only assessment of the Hungarian parliamentary elections that stood unchallenged Monday. The two parties with the highest number of votes, Tolgyessy's liberal Free Democrats and the center-right Hungarian Democratic Forum, both claimed to have taken the commanding ground in position for a second round of runoff elections on April 8.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1990 | GREGORY MILES, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
Anna Barabas, a Hungarian pensioner, breaks down in tears in a Budapest subway station as she talks about her plight. When Hungary's former Communist leaders were replaced in April by the first democratically elected government in 40 years, she was hopeful that her living standard would improve. Instead, inflation is expected to reach 35% to 40% in 1991, on top of 30% this year, making it ever harder for her to survive on her $90-a-month government pension.
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