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Journal Of The American Medical Association

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NEWS
January 7, 1992 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not the first time the berobed Maharishi has bumped heads with the gurus of modern American medicine, but never before have they collided with such enthusiasm and velocity. In one corner, the followers of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, who, with a little help from his friends the Beatles, brought us Transcendental Meditation. In the other corner, the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Assn., which every week reports the latest in medical research. Welcome to medicine-for-a-new-millenium.
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NEWS
April 25, 2001 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Nearly one-third of U.S. schoolchildren in the sixth through the 10th grades have bullied other children or been bullied, according to the first study of its kind, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. The study, based on a poll of 15,000 schoolchildren, found that bullies and their victims are more likely to have psychological or behavioral difficulties--a finding that underscores the need for schools and society to take action, said the study's authors.
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NEWS
January 16, 1999 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The American Medical Assn. fired the editor of its flagship journal Thursday for publishing research in the midst of the impeachment trial showing that 60% of college students surveyed in 1991 did not think that engaging in oral sex was "having sex." The editor, Dr. George D. Lundberg, "inappropriately and inexcusably" interjected the Journal of the American Medical Assn. into a "major political debate that has nothing to do with science or medicine," said AMA Executive Vice President Dr. E.
NEWS
October 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
A woman who is a vice dean of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine today was named editor of the American Medical Assn.'s influential journal, the first female editor in its 116-year history. At a New York City news conference, Dr. Catherine D. De Angelis was introduced as editor of the Journal of the American Medical Assn., succeeding Dr. George Lundberg. Lundberg's firing in January provoked a controversy over the journal's editorial independence.
NEWS
April 25, 2001 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Nearly one-third of U.S. schoolchildren in the sixth through the 10th grades have bullied other children or been bullied, according to the first study of its kind, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. The study, based on a poll of 15,000 schoolchildren, found that bullies and their victims are more likely to have psychological or behavioral difficulties--a finding that underscores the need for schools and society to take action, said the study's authors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A prominent UCLA researcher, who wrote an editorial dismissing the likelihood of neurological illness from pertussis vaccines, will publish a clarification noting that he omitted mentioning he is a paid consultant to a vaccine manufacturer. Dr. James D. Cherry, a professor of pediatrics, agreed to the clarification after the Journal of the American Medical Assn. learned that he failed to make the kind of financial disclosure required of journal authors since last October. "Dr.
NEWS
October 4, 1989
Spurred by concerns about cases of scientific misconduct, a prestigious medical journal will require study authors to sign a pledge that they will let editors examine their raw data if requested, the journal editor said. The journal also will tighten its requirement on disclosing financial interests involved in the research, said George Lundberg of the Journal of the American Medical Assn. The steps are among requirements being imposed to protect the credibility of the journal, Lundberg said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
California researchers say they have confirmed a controversial finding of a genetic factor in alcoholism, but they suspect the gene is not the cause but a "modifying" gene that conspires with other genetic and social factors to increase risk. The finding, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., is said to represent the first instance in which a series of independent studies have found that a specific gene may influence the development of a common behavioral disorder.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Old-fashioned newspaper warfare broke out last week in the sedate sanctums of biomedical research when one of the country's top medical journals abruptly upped its publication date in hopes of upstaging its nemesis, the New England Journal of Medicine. The decision of the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
NEWS
October 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
A woman who is a vice dean of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine today was named editor of the American Medical Assn.'s influential journal, the first female editor in its 116-year history. At a New York City news conference, Dr. Catherine D. De Angelis was introduced as editor of the Journal of the American Medical Assn., succeeding Dr. George Lundberg. Lundberg's firing in January provoked a controversy over the journal's editorial independence.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The American Medical Assn. fired the editor of its flagship journal Thursday for publishing research in the midst of the impeachment trial showing that 60% of college students surveyed in 1991 did not think that engaging in oral sex was "having sex." The editor, Dr. George D. Lundberg, "inappropriately and inexcusably" interjected the Journal of the American Medical Assn. into a "major political debate that has nothing to do with science or medicine," said AMA Executive Vice President Dr. E.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two pathologists who conducted the autopsy of President John F. Kennedy broke almost three decades of silence Tuesday to make public their conclusion that he was struck by two bullets from a single high-velocity rifle fired by a lone assassin. In what amounts to a powerful endorsement of the conclusions of the Warren Commission, Drs. James J. Humes and J. Thornton Boswell, who performed the autopsy at the U.S. Naval Center in Bethesda, Md.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not the first time the berobed Maharishi has bumped heads with the gurus of modern American medicine, but never before have they collided with such enthusiasm and velocity. In one corner, the followers of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, who, with a little help from his friends the Beatles, brought us Transcendental Meditation. In the other corner, the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Assn., which every week reports the latest in medical research. Welcome to medicine-for-a-new-millenium.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The oft-quoted Journal of the American Medical Assn. said last week that it had been hoodwinked by followers of Hindu guru Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. In a lengthy article and a series of letters from readers in the medical community, the publication accused authors of a report it carried last May of failing to disclose that they had a financial interest in the Indian herbal medicine promoted in the article.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
California researchers say they have confirmed a controversial finding of a genetic factor in alcoholism, but they suspect the gene is not the cause but a "modifying" gene that conspires with other genetic and social factors to increase risk. The finding, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., is said to represent the first instance in which a series of independent studies have found that a specific gene may influence the development of a common behavioral disorder.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that it will not allow L-tryptophan back on the market, despite a call by the Costa Mesa-based National Nutritional Foods Assn. to lift the agency's ban on the food supplement. The FDA's statement in Washington came despite news that a study will be published today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. indicating that an epidemic of a potentially fatal blood disorder may be linked to only one manufacturer of the food supplement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The oft-quoted Journal of the American Medical Assn. said last week that it had been hoodwinked by followers of Hindu guru Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. In a lengthy article and a series of letters from readers in the medical community, the publication accused authors of a report it carried last May of failing to disclose that they had a financial interest in the Indian herbal medicine promoted in the article.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two pathologists who conducted the autopsy of President John F. Kennedy broke almost three decades of silence Tuesday to make public their conclusion that he was struck by two bullets from a single high-velocity rifle fired by a lone assassin. In what amounts to a powerful endorsement of the conclusions of the Warren Commission, Drs. James J. Humes and J. Thornton Boswell, who performed the autopsy at the U.S. Naval Center in Bethesda, Md.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A prominent UCLA researcher, who wrote an editorial dismissing the likelihood of neurological illness from pertussis vaccines, will publish a clarification noting that he omitted mentioning he is a paid consultant to a vaccine manufacturer. Dr. James D. Cherry, a professor of pediatrics, agreed to the clarification after the Journal of the American Medical Assn. learned that he failed to make the kind of financial disclosure required of journal authors since last October. "Dr.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Old-fashioned newspaper warfare broke out last week in the sedate sanctums of biomedical research when one of the country's top medical journals abruptly upped its publication date in hopes of upstaging its nemesis, the New England Journal of Medicine. The decision of the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
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