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OPINION
October 20, 2012
Re "Will Variety ink Finke?," Opinion, Oct. 14 Stephen Randall does a disservice to Daily Variety when he casts it as a cozy little house organ for Hollywood executives. During the Silverman family's ownership from 1905-87, Variety exposed the mob's attempted takeover of Hollywood by frontman Willie Bioff. Under longtime editor Thomas M. Pryor, for whom I worked for 15 years, it continued to expose shady financial dealings, payola and inflated grosses. It advocated responsibility in a business often without scruples.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By David Colker
Former Los Angeles Times reporter Ruth Ryon, who created the highly popular and enduring Hot Property column on celebrity real estate, died Friday at a hospice facility in Redondo Beach. She was 69. The cause was complications of Parkinson's disease, said her husband, George Ryon. For Angelenos, some of whom visit homes for sale even if they're not looking to buy, Ryon's column quickly became a guilty-pleasure must-read. The first column, which appeared Nov. 25, 1984, led with Johnny Carson buying a house in Malibu for $9.5 million, at the time the most ever paid in that area for a single-family home.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2012
Journalism Joe Sacco Metropolitan: 192 pp., $29   Jerusalem Chronicles from the Holy City Guy Delisle Drawn & Quarterly: 336 pp., $24.95
NEWS
March 27, 2014
As deputy managing editor for visual journalism at the Los Angeles Times, Colin Crawford manages a staff of editors, photojournalists and technicians at one of the largest newspapers in the country. Crawford was appointed to his current position in May 2008; he previously was assistant managing editor for photography, a position he began in February 2004.  Under his leadership, The Times' photography department has won the Pulitzer Prize in Feature Photography in 2003, 2004 and 2010, was part of the Public Service Award in 2005 and shared the Explanatory Reporting prize in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | By David Ng
The USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Program, a pioneering series of fellowships for professional arts journalists, has come to an end. Director Sasha Anawalt, an associate professor and director of arts journalism programs at USC, confirmed the closure of the 12-year-old program. The fellowships have ended because the Getty Foundation is no longer funding the program, Anawalt said. The last series of fellowships concluded in November, she said.  Deborah Marrow, director, Getty Foundation, said in a statement that the foundation is proud to have supported the program, but "we have focused our grants on special initiatives and we do not provide indefinite support for any initiative.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1999
Whether through cave paintings, drumbeats, hieroglyphics or printed pages, news has played an important role in people's lives. The Founding Fathers believed that newspapers were so important to a democracy that the 1st Amendment to the Constitution provides for freedom of the press. Learn about the history of news, keep up with current events and try writing your own articles through the direct links on the Times Launch Point Web site: http://www.latimes.
NATIONAL
April 13, 2010
The winners PUBLIC SERVICE The Bristol (Va.) Herald Courier BREAKING NEWS REPORTING The Seattle Times staff INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING Barbara Laker and Wendy Ruderman of the Philadelphia Daily News, and Sheri Fink of ProPublica, in collaboration with the New York Times Magazine EXPLANATORY REPORTING Michael Moss and members of the New York Times staff LOCAL REPORTING Raquel Rutledge of the Milwaukee...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
The Northwestern University professor who had agreed to head up USC's journalism programs but then quickly decided against it attributed his decision to “a mismatch” between visions of the job. Douglas Foster said that last week he had tentatively accepted the position as director of USC's journalism school, pending agreement on a few points. He declined to specify what details caused him to change his mind two days later, and stressed that final contract papers with the USC Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism had not been drawn up or signed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
The search for a new director of USC's journalism school has taken a confusing turn after a Northwestern University professor accepted the job but then suddenly withdrew two days later. Douglas Foster's reversal and decision not to head up USC's undergraduate and graduate journalism programs “was disappointing,” according to Ernest J. Wilson III, dean of the USC Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism. But Wilson predicted it would turn out to be “a bump in the road” in the life of the journalism school, which is one of Annenberg's two academic units.
OPINION
February 9, 2011 | Tim Rutten
Whatever the ultimate impact of AOL's $315-million acquisition of the Huffington Post on the new-media landscape, it's already clear that the merger will push more journalists more deeply into the tragically expanding low-wage sector of our increasingly brutal economy. That's a development that will hurt not only the people who gather and edit the news but also readers and viewers. To understand why, it's helpful to step back from the wide-eyed coverage focused on foundering AOL's last-ditch effort to stave off the oblivion of irrelevance, or Brentwood-based Arianna Huffington's astonishing commercial achievement in taking her Web news portal from startup to commercial success in less than six years.
NEWS
March 27, 2014
Jimmy Orr was named managing editor, online, of the Los Angeles Times in February 2011. Orr directs the strategy for latimes.com, supervises the team that produces the site, and oversees the Los Angeles Times Media Group's growing portfolio of digital and mobile properties, including Android, iPad and Windows applications.  Orr joined The Times in August 2010 as deputy editor, online focusing his efforts on improving reader acquisition, retention,...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Larry Gordon and Daniel Miller
Television news anchor Willow Bay, a veteran of ABC, CNN and Bloomberg TV, will be the next director of USC's School of Journalism, campus officials announced Wednesday. Bay's experience is expected to help the school emphasize online and television journalism. Her two predecessors worked in newspapers. Bay's selection concludes a lengthy search that was marred last year when the previously announced choice, a Northwestern University professor, turned down the USC job two days after accepting it. Bay, 50, is a senior editor at Huffington Post and a special correspondent and host for Bloomberg TV. She has co-anchored ABC's "Good Morning America/Sunday" and CNN's "Moneyline News Hour," and was the lead writer and producer of CNN's weekend news program "Pinnacle.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2014 | By Daniel Miller
Journalist Willow Bay has been named director of the journalism school at USC's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, the university announced Wednesday. Bay, 50, is  a senior editor at the Huffington Post and a s pecial correspondent and host for Bloomberg TV . She also has been a producer, author and  television news anchor, and is married to Bob Iger, chairman and chief executive of Walt Disney Co. “The breadth of Willow Bay's experiences, skills and talents is extraordinary,” said Ernest James Wilson III, dean of the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, in a statement.  “Her leadership will help our innovative school aggressively continue our path of creating -- and defining -- the digital future.” ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll Bay has co-anchored ABC's "Good Morning America/Sunday" and CNN's "Moneyline News Hour," and was the lead writer and producer of CNN's weekend news program "Pinnacle.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | By David Ng
The USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Program, a pioneering series of fellowships for professional arts journalists, has come to an end. Director Sasha Anawalt, an associate professor and director of arts journalism programs at USC, confirmed the closure of the 12-year-old program. The fellowships have ended because the Getty Foundation is no longer funding the program, Anawalt said. The last series of fellowships concluded in November, she said.  Deborah Marrow, director, Getty Foundation, said in a statement that the foundation is proud to have supported the program, but "we have focused our grants on special initiatives and we do not provide indefinite support for any initiative.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2014 | By Elaine Woo
William F. Thomas, an editor who led The Times during an extraordinary period of expansion in the 1970s and 1980s, when the paper widened its reach nationally and abroad and became a showcase for literary journalism, has died. He was 89. Thomas, who helped the paper reap 11 Pulitzer Prizes during his three-decade career at The Times, died Sunday of natural causes at his home in Sherman Oaks, said his son, Pete. "He was perhaps the least well-known of any editor of any major newspaper," said former Times Publisher and CNN President Tom Johnson . "He never sought the spotlight for himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"Above the Fold," the title of former New York Times reporter Bernard Weinraub's stacked new morality play about 21st century journalism now at the Pasadena Playhouse, reveals the author's background as an ink-stained dinosaur. For tablet-reading news junkies under 40, the expression refers to the placement on the front page of a broadsheet newspaper that attracts the most eyeballs and therefore wields the most influence. The very appealing Taraji P. Henson, best known for her role in the CBS crime drama "Person of Interest," stars as Jane, an ambitious reporter at a prestige New York newspaper who's tired of writing lifestyle pieces about trendy Harlem restaurants.
NATIONAL
August 13, 2013 | By David Horsey
During a quick trip to Maryland for a weekend wedding, I was in the nation's capital long enough to discover who it is that has caught the town's attention. It is not President Obama off on his golf vacation or any of the members of Congress scattered back to their home districts. No, the person of great interest is a Seattle billionaire named Jeff Bezos. Bezos, the founder and master of the Amazon.com online retail empire, has just agreed to purchase the Washington Post, and everyone from loyal subscribers to journalists with national reputations is speculating about what this surprising sale may mean for the city, for inside-the-beltway politics and for the future of traditional journalism.
NEWS
April 19, 1995 | Associated Press
Lee Hills, former chief executive of the Knight-Ridder newspaper group, will give the University of Missouri $1.1 million to establish an endowed chair in journalism. Hills announced the gift Tuesday during dedication ceremonies for a new journalism building named for him.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
The skateboarder who killed two skate shop employees and himself at a Maryland mall last weekend wrote in his journal that he hated other people and wanted to die, police said Wednesday. Howard County police still have not figured out whether Darion Marcus Aguilar, 19, knew his victims,  Brianna Benlolo, 21, of College Park, and Tyler Johnson, 25, of  Mount Airy . Aguilar lived in College Park with his mother.  Police said this week that Aguilar used to hang out at The Mall in Columbia -- the shopping center in Columbia, Md., where the shooting occurred -- and smoke in small groups. Quy Le Vo, an employee of the shop where Aguilar's victims worked, told the Baltimore Sun he had seen him in the store before but didn't remember anything specific about his visits.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Los Angeles entrepreneur Jason Calacanis is back with a new mobile news app that summarizes articles in 300 characters - - or about 40 words - - or less. His bet: With more people hoovering up news while on the go, they need a news app built for their smartphones . It may not be a groundbreaking notion, but its aim is true. Inside searches out the original article rather than rewarding someone who rehashed someone else's scoop and then slapped a clever, link-baiting headline on it (not to mention feel-good fluff and the now ubiquitous listicle )
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