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SPORTS
February 18, 1996 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
It was 35 years ago this week that he walked into the minds and hearts of Los Angeles sports fans. Walked is probably the wrong word. More liked barged. His name was Jim Murray, and his first offering as a sports columnist for the Los Angeles Times, Feb. 12, 1961, was a fastball down the middle. Perceptive readers knew right away that this guy wasn't going to throw changeups or nibble at the corners.
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NATIONAL
August 21, 2011 | Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
The brown-leather journal is my passport to Sept. 11, 2001. When I hold it in my hands, images and memories are no further away than yesterday. I had no notebook with me when my husband and I dropped our children, 8 and 4, at school that morning. Then came news of the attacks at the World Trade Center, and my husband pulled the journal from his briefcase. He pressed it into my hand so I would have something to write on. Rereading it, I wonder why I wrote in blue ink for several pages and switched to black.
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NATIONAL
August 21, 2011 | Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
The brown-leather journal is my passport to Sept. 11, 2001. When I hold it in my hands, images and memories are no further away than yesterday. I had no notebook with me when my husband and I dropped our children, 8 and 4, at school that morning. Then came news of the attacks at the World Trade Center, and my husband pulled the journal from his briefcase. He pressed it into my hand so I would have something to write on. Rereading it, I wonder why I wrote in blue ink for several pages and switched to black.
SPORTS
February 18, 1996 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
It was 35 years ago this week that he walked into the minds and hearts of Los Angeles sports fans. Walked is probably the wrong word. More liked barged. His name was Jim Murray, and his first offering as a sports columnist for the Los Angeles Times, Feb. 12, 1961, was a fastball down the middle. Perceptive readers knew right away that this guy wasn't going to throw changeups or nibble at the corners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1995
Today's focus is LA Youth, a bimonthly newspaper produced by local teen-agers, with a circulation of 100,000. Interested in bringing youth's perspective to journalism? Any Los Angeles-area teen-ager between the ages of 13 and 18 may join the LA Youth staff by calling (213) 938-9194.
NEWS
January 19, 1998
Jack D. Cravens, 81, the last surviving founding member of the Greater Los Angeles Press Club. Cravens was a reporter at the tabloid Daily News when he and seven others from Los Angeles' four daily newspapers organized the club Sept. 24, 1946. Cravens served as president of the group in 1949. Later, Cravens, who covered the Los Angeles County district attorney's office, earned a law degree from Southwestern University School of Law and joined the office as a prosecutor. A native of Lincoln, Neb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1990 | JOHN H. LEE, STAFF WRITER
Extortion charges were dismissed Thursday against three staff members of a Koreatown tabloid newspaper who had been accused of demanding money from businesses that were the subject of running investigative stories. The dismissal of charges was announced by Los Angeles County Deputy Dist. Atty. Ken Marks, who said the action was taken because prosecutors could not locate a key witness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2011 | Dennis McLellan
Stanley Robertson, who broke color barriers as a pioneering black network television program executive at NBC in the 1960s and '70s and later as a movie studio production executive, has died. He was 85. Robertson, who had been in poor health recently, died Nov. 16 of an apparent heart attack at his Bel-Air home, said his wife, Ruby. An associate editor at Ebony magazine before quitting in 1954 to study telecommunications, Robertson launched his television career as a page at NBC in Burbank after graduating from USC in 1957.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1997
Los Angeles Times columnist Al Martinez was honored Thursday night by the Society of Professional Journalists as print journalist of the year. A veteran reporter and feature writer who joined The Times in 1972, Martinez became a columnist in 1984. He has won numerous journalism awards and is the author of four books. Also honored at the awards banquet was Jose Rios, news director of Fox 11 television's news department, who was named broadcast journalist of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1986 | LEE MARGULIES, Times Staff Writer
For the second time in her career, Sandy Hill was dropped Friday as an anchor at KCBS Channel 2. Beginning Monday, she'll be replaced on the station's 4:30 p.m. weekday newscast by veteran journalist and commentator Bill Stout. Frank Gardner, general manager of KCBS, said replacing Hill with Stout constituted the "finishing touch" on an effort over the past six months to turn the early newscast into "a hard-hitting, substantial broadcast." Hill had been on her second tour at Channel 2.
NEWS
September 24, 1995 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People said the guy was fearless. His assignment should have been fairly routine. But Robert Sam Anson was gutsy, the kind of writer colleagues imagined nursed a Hemingway complex. So when Time magazine sent their young New York bureau reporter to cover the training camp preparations for the first Joe Frazier-Muhammad Ali fight many moons ago, Anson didn't just report the news. "I thought this guy was completely out of his mind," recalls former Time writer Chris Byron.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2011
Frank Potenza Jimmy Kimmel's uncle and comic foil Frank Potenza, 77, a former New York City police officer who turned to comedy as "Uncle Frank" on his nephew Jimmy Kimmel's late-night talk show, died Tuesday. In a statement, ABC's"Jimmy Kimmel Live!" show confirmed the death but released no other details. The silver-haired Potenza had spent 20 years as a police officer and 10 more as a private security guard in Las Vegas when Kimmel asked him to join his fledgling show as a security guard and cast member in 2003.
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