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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1989
A "well done" to the journalism students of Saddleback College! The purpose of an editorial column is to express opinion. The purpose of a cartoon is to caricature and lampoon. The effectiveness of both activities on the part of the Lariat staff is proved by the reactions of the would-be censors. DAIVD McCALDEN Manhattan Beach
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NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Paul Thornton
After an important cultural icon dies, it isn't unusual for a handful of readers to reflect on how the recently deceased's work touched their lives. Author Ray Bradbury, who passed away last week, was no exception. Of the 42 (and counting) submissions sent to letters@latimes.com, several readers credited Bradbury's work for stoking their own imaginations and inspiring them to pursue careers in a number of creative fields. But the preponderance of submissions responding to Bradbury's death -- which are still trickling in, a week after the author passed June 5 -- have a personal dimension.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1987
The Donna Rice Syndrome, as mentioned in Rosenfield's article, is only a symptom of a disease that has afflicted most members of the mass media and that threatens to infect all journalism students. The media today is controlled by a few powerful corporations, monopolies that dictate an agenda of fast-food servings called news to distract the masses from substance and truth. Gone are the gutsy reporters who probed and poked into a lead, found a story and reported with focused integrity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Overwhelmed by the grief of widowhood in the early 1980s, Helen Krogh placed an advertisement in a newspaper seeking others in the same situation in Sacramento who might want to gather to talk. Six days later, she was exhausted from answering the phone but had knit together a core group of "founding mothers" of what became a statewide support group, Widowed Persons Assn. of California, her family said. Krogh died Aug. 20 of a cerebral hemorrhage at her Sacramento home, said her son, Randy Atkinson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1992
Regarding your account of President Blenda Wilson's first public appearance ("CSUN Leader Hopes to Tap New Funds," Times Valley Edition, Sept. 11), please note that this entire event was conceived, organized and controlled by the student chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ). President Wilson was our guest. She had nothing to do with the ground rules for questioning, as reported by Sam Enriquez, who said: "Professional media were not allowed to ask questions under the rules she (Wilson)
OPINION
September 2, 2009
Re "Cal State Dominguez Hills loses its newspaper, for now," Column, Aug. 28 The shutdown at Dominguez Hills is actually really very fortunate. Having been liberated from the illusion of a future in print publishing, the journalism students are now free to explore the amazing possibilities the Internet offers. The biggest issue in journalism today is adapting to technological changes. No one has found an optimal solution yet, so the students have just been offered an opportunity to develop something unique.
NEWS
August 1, 1996 | LISA DILLMAN
Gold medal favorite Tan Shuping of China was out of the three-meter springboard competition after the preliminaries, having flopped in spectacular fashion Tuesday night. Reporters requested a translator, and the helpful ACOG volunteer came back, smiling. "We sent them home," she said. The preliminaries had not finished at that point and reporters from the Dallas Morning News, The Times and Associated Press pointed out that it was important that they talk to the reigning world champion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1988
Having taught high school journalism for a number of years and having recently been under the heel of the likes of a Robert Reynolds, the Missouri high school principal who censored the student newspaper The Spectrum, I find the Supreme Court's ruling that supported Reynold's action and diminished high school students' right to free expression in school-sponsored publications not only disquieting and ominous, but also sadly predictable. As I was in the habit of saying each semester to my journalism students, that is, before being fired by the principal: "Without our Bill of Rights, there would be but little difference between the American form of democracy and the Russian form of communism.
NEWS
March 9, 1986 | DEAN MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A High Tide rises from a basement classroom on Diamond Street in Redondo Beach every two weeks. Several miles up the coast in Manhattan Beach, a High Tide rises at about the same time in a second-floor office on Rosecrans Avenue. The two High Tides, unlike their nautical namesake, are movements of words not oceans. They are newspapers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Overwhelmed by the grief of widowhood in the early 1980s, Helen Krogh placed an advertisement in a newspaper seeking others in the same situation in Sacramento who might want to gather to talk. Six days later, she was exhausted from answering the phone but had knit together a core group of "founding mothers" of what became a statewide support group, Widowed Persons Assn. of California, her family said. Krogh died Aug. 20 of a cerebral hemorrhage at her Sacramento home, said her son, Randy Atkinson.
OPINION
September 2, 2009
Re "Cal State Dominguez Hills loses its newspaper, for now," Column, Aug. 28 The shutdown at Dominguez Hills is actually really very fortunate. Having been liberated from the illusion of a future in print publishing, the journalism students are now free to explore the amazing possibilities the Internet offers. The biggest issue in journalism today is adapting to technological changes. No one has found an optimal solution yet, so the students have just been offered an opportunity to develop something unique.
NEWS
August 1, 1996 | LISA DILLMAN
Gold medal favorite Tan Shuping of China was out of the three-meter springboard competition after the preliminaries, having flopped in spectacular fashion Tuesday night. Reporters requested a translator, and the helpful ACOG volunteer came back, smiling. "We sent them home," she said. The preliminaries had not finished at that point and reporters from the Dallas Morning News, The Times and Associated Press pointed out that it was important that they talk to the reigning world champion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1995 | DAVID E. BRADY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito gave what is believed to be his first interview since the end of the O.J. Simpson murder trial to a college journalism student, and he defended his decision to allow Simpson's trial to be televised. In a five-minute segment videotaped Friday at the Downtown Criminal Courts Building, Ito told Cal State Northridge senior Gayle Gomer that the public benefited from viewing the trial on television. "My gut reaction . . .
NEWS
July 9, 1995 | IAN JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roxana Cornejo lives in a purple cinder-block apartment behind black bars and screens that cover the doors and windows. Outside, mangled swings are wrapped around a bar that used to support playing children. For 17-year-old Cornejo, the Imperial Courts housing project in South-Central Los Angeles has been home for the past three years, and she says it's a tough place to grow up. "I don't want to see young people live like I've lived," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1992
Regarding your account of President Blenda Wilson's first public appearance ("CSUN Leader Hopes to Tap New Funds," Times Valley Edition, Sept. 11), please note that this entire event was conceived, organized and controlled by the student chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ). President Wilson was our guest. She had nothing to do with the ground rules for questioning, as reported by Sam Enriquez, who said: "Professional media were not allowed to ask questions under the rules she (Wilson)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1989
A "well done" to the journalism students of Saddleback College! The purpose of an editorial column is to express opinion. The purpose of a cartoon is to caricature and lampoon. The effectiveness of both activities on the part of the Lariat staff is proved by the reactions of the would-be censors. DAIVD McCALDEN Manhattan Beach
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Paul Thornton
After an important cultural icon dies, it isn't unusual for a handful of readers to reflect on how the recently deceased's work touched their lives. Author Ray Bradbury, who passed away last week, was no exception. Of the 42 (and counting) submissions sent to letters@latimes.com, several readers credited Bradbury's work for stoking their own imaginations and inspiring them to pursue careers in a number of creative fields. But the preponderance of submissions responding to Bradbury's death -- which are still trickling in, a week after the author passed June 5 -- have a personal dimension.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1987 | Al Martinez
For those eagerly awaiting the next generation of journalists to improve the sorry lot of today's newspapers, I bear grim tidings. They can't spel and they think Desmond Tutu is a ballerina. That may not mean a hell of a lot out there, since good spelling is not a requirement for pumping gas or repairing furnaces, but to those of us in the business of accurate information, an ability to spell is, to say the least, essential.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1988
Having taught high school journalism for a number of years and having recently been under the heel of the likes of a Robert Reynolds, the Missouri high school principal who censored the student newspaper The Spectrum, I find the Supreme Court's ruling that supported Reynold's action and diminished high school students' right to free expression in school-sponsored publications not only disquieting and ominous, but also sadly predictable. As I was in the habit of saying each semester to my journalism students, that is, before being fired by the principal: "Without our Bill of Rights, there would be but little difference between the American form of democracy and the Russian form of communism.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1987
The Donna Rice Syndrome, as mentioned in Rosenfield's article, is only a symptom of a disease that has afflicted most members of the mass media and that threatens to infect all journalism students. The media today is controlled by a few powerful corporations, monopolies that dictate an agenda of fast-food servings called news to distract the masses from substance and truth. Gone are the gutsy reporters who probed and poked into a lead, found a story and reported with focused integrity.
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