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BUSINESS
June 12, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
To the personnel office, Janet Chusmir seemed a bad risk. She was a 33-year-old housewife with two adolescent kids and no job experience. It was 1963, and even though the job was just women's editor of the tiny Miami Beach Daily Sun, a community paper owned as a sideline by some executives of the Miami Herald, the word came down from personnel: Skip her. The Sun failed to take that advice.
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TRAVEL
July 9, 2000 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
One of the traits that distinguished Freya Stark, the great English traveler, linguist and writer, was the way she "advanced inwardly" as she roamed the world, novelist Lawrence Durrell said. The notion of an inward journey that parallels the outward trip is distinctive in the writings of women travelers, I've found, which is partly why it's important for women to keep a journal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1990
Maclovio Perez of KCBS Channel 2 will host the Comision Femenil de Los Angeles' annual fund-raising banquet tonight at 6:30 in the Biltmore Hotel's Crystal Ballroom. Six Latina journalists are to be honored for their professional and volunteer contributions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1990
Maclovio Perez of KCBS Channel 2 will host the Comision Femenil de Los Angeles' annual fund-raising banquet tonight at 6:30 in the Biltmore Hotel's Crystal Ballroom. Six Latina journalists are to be honored for their professional and volunteer contributions.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pauline Frederick, a pioneering broadcast journalist who helped open radio and television newsrooms to other women, has died. Miss Frederick, who was 84, died Wednesday after a heart attack in the Chicago suburb of Lake Forest, where she had been visiting relatives. "She was the first full-fledged woman correspondent and opened doors for women's acceptance in television and radio journalism," said Beryl Pfizer, a news producer at NBC who had worked with Frederick.
TRAVEL
July 9, 2000 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
One of the traits that distinguished Freya Stark, the great English traveler, linguist and writer, was the way she "advanced inwardly" as she roamed the world, novelist Lawrence Durrell said. The notion of an inward journey that parallels the outward trip is distinctive in the writings of women travelers, I've found, which is partly why it's important for women to keep a journal.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1987
Three major events are spread throughout a weekend of screenings, conferences and seminars at the Cineplex Odeon Universal City Cinemas. Tonight, a black-tie gala will honor actress Bette Davis' 100th feature film--Lindsay Anderson's "The Whales of August," which receives its West Coast premiere earlier in the evening--at Universal Studios Sound Stage 28 at approximately 9 p.m. Actress-producer Marsha Mason will host the affair, at which Davis is scheduled to appear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Marion Carpenter, one of the first women to be a White House photographer, who traveled with President Harry Truman and covered him daily, has died. Although Carpenter broke ground in her profession, she died alone and destitute at the age of 82. Her body was found Oct. 29, it was reported this week, on a couch at her St. Paul, Minn., home, bundled up tightly against the cold because the thermostat had been lowered to save money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Kay Mills, a widely respected journalist and award-winning author whose books reflected her deep interest in women's issues and the civil rights movement, died Thursday at Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica. She was 69. The cause was a heart attack, said a close friend, Geraldine Kennedy. Mills was the author of five books, including "A Place in the News: From the Women's Pages to the Front Page" (1988) and "This Little Light of Mine: The Life of Fannie Lou Hamer" (1993)
NEWS
October 13, 1997 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A couple of years ago, Courtney Weaver, overeducated and underwhelmed with the literary job market for twentysomethings, was living the glamorous life of a freelance writer: waiting tables and ripping open the mail to find anonymous rejection slips. Then she read an article about a new Internet magazine and thought she had the perfect topic for a column: her sex life. The fortysomething male editors behind Salon, the Internet start-up, weren't so sure.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pauline Frederick, a pioneering broadcast journalist who helped open radio and television newsrooms to other women, has died. Miss Frederick, who was 84, died Wednesday after a heart attack in the Chicago suburb of Lake Forest, where she had been visiting relatives. "She was the first full-fledged woman correspondent and opened doors for women's acceptance in television and radio journalism," said Beryl Pfizer, a news producer at NBC who had worked with Frederick.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
To the personnel office, Janet Chusmir seemed a bad risk. She was a 33-year-old housewife with two adolescent kids and no job experience. It was 1963, and even though the job was just women's editor of the tiny Miami Beach Daily Sun, a community paper owned as a sideline by some executives of the Miami Herald, the word came down from personnel: Skip her. The Sun failed to take that advice.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | SANDY BANKS
It was the most satisfying weekend I'd spent in a long time--three days in seclusion with a hundred of the country's most progressive women journalists. We talked about our jobs, our families, our role in society. We applauded each other's successes, supported each other's dreams, strengthened each other's resolve. When I returned from the recent Journalism and Women Symposium (JAWS), it was with renewed vigor and a revitalized spirit.
OPINION
August 25, 1991 | Caryl Rivers, Caryl Rivers, a professor of journalism at Boston University, is the author of "Indecent Behavior" (Dutton/NAL)
It's official. The Glass Ceiling exists. This is not news to a lot of people who have lumps from bumping against it, but now the Bush Administration has certified that women and minorities have trouble moving up in corporate America. Labor Secretary Lynn Martin recently announced the results of a government study showing that the roadblocks faced by women and members of minority groups are pervasive, not figments of some feminist imagination.
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