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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2003 | Steve Lopez
He sits on the edge of the bed, leering into the camera with lizard eyes. She lies behind him, passed out, her face turned away and her dress drawn up high. I lost count of how many times this sicko scene was repeated Wednesday night on a CBS "news" show called "48 Hours Investigates," but I'd say at least a half dozen. As if viewers might have forgotten seeing it six minutes earlier.
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OPINION
January 31, 2008
Re "Lebanon held hostage," editorial, Jan. 30 Your editorial was accurate on one count: The U.N. investigation "has made enormous progress." The investigative team has worked diligently with several countries, including Syria, to find out who was behind this heinous crime. Never has a crime investigation amassed so much money, manpower and technology. However, no suspects have been named to date, and to mislead your readers into thinking that this is a clear-cut case goes against journalistic integrity.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1993
This letter is written in response to the letter signed by Don and Jacky Wallace and Patrick and Rose Forrest regarding John Flynn's comments about the county's retirement funds being invested in South Africa. The letter questioned the journalistic integrity of the article. Perhaps it's not a question of journalistic integrity but that Flynn has shown his true colors. ELIZABETH WILLIAMS Oxnard
SPORTS
April 8, 2006
Barry Bonds should retire. By doing so, Bonds can let all the sports losers get back to their lives and, more important, make the statement once and for all that a game is just a game. Sportsmanship and dignity have nothing to do with records that are easily broken in the long run. And for that, there is absolutely no doubt. By the way, how's Barry Sanders doing? TRONG NGUYEN Brooklyn Whose bright idea was it for ESPN to come up with a show like "Bonds on Bonds?"
SPORTS
September 9, 1995
The extreme prejudice shown by The Times' sports staff has never been more clearly demonstrated than last week. When two football players who were denied admission by USC were arrested on charges of grand theft auto, they were described as "two former USC recruits." When they were exonerated, The Times referred to them as "El Camino football players." Pleasing the Notre Dame sports editor has taken precedence over journalistic integrity. JAMES E. KELLY Chatsworth
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2001
Brian Lowry's article, "And Now a Word From Our Anchor" (Oct. 14) raised significant issues and concerns of journalistic integrity that newscasters in Los Angeles grapple with on a daily basis. The Los Angeles local of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, AFL-CIO, represents the on-air professional news, weather, sports and talk-show staff broadcasters at most of the stations mentioned in Mr. Lowry's article. A distinction needs to be made between explicit product endorsements and the reading of commercials on these stations.
MAGAZINE
September 22, 1991
Sadly, Barone is yet another in the seemingly endless list of literary sidewalk vendors, passing himself off as an expert on U.S. domestic politics. During the past 45 years, the media in this country have produced an intolerable number of political "experts" who have sold out to the usurpers of the democracy and lied to the people. Mr. Barone, sadder than watching the destruction of the Democratic Party has been witnessing the wholesale betrayal of individuals' honor and the absolutely promiscuous decline of journalistic integrity.
SPORTS
December 12, 1992
Your hatchet job on the University of Washington football team is yet another disturbing example of journalistic irresponsibility. Although you couch your articles in a style of objective fact-finding, your attack on this football program is obviously a biased attempt to (1) imply that Washington's recent domination of the local Pac-10 football teams is attributable to something beyond the play on the football field, (2) scare off local high school prospects who are deciding whether to select Washington over the local Pac-10 schools, and (3)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1993
Regarding "Still Marching to a Different Drum," by Robert Hilburn (Dec. 5): I have long been a Hilburn non-fan. His interview with Linda Ronstadt points out my legitimate concerns, as he consistently insists on forming his own conclusions before ever asking a question. Ronstadt wanted to talk about her musical roots and influences, the truth of her artistic experience. Hilburn sought to draw conclusions that did not exist. As for questions of a private matter, Ronstadt responded: "I never talk about my personal life," as she has often contended.
NEWS
August 9, 1987
Thanks to David McGee for exposing Bruce Springsteen as the greedy, two-faced hypocrite that he is (Pop Eye, by Patrick Goldstein, Aug. 2). What courage it must have taken for you (a veritable paragon of journalistic integrity) to fly in the face of a public deluded into thinking that the Boss was a halfway decent guy! Quickly, let me melt down my albums and run my T-shirts and Levi's through the shredder before I am corrupted any further. Dave, we are all indebted to you for showing us what the face of a mean-spirited, petty back-stabber really looks like.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2006
IT'S really a howl when a dedicated left-winger such as Tim Rutten expresses outrage because CNN has balanced its notorious liberalism with a conservative voice, such as Lou Dobbs' with his take on illegal immigration ["Lou Dobbs: Bile Across the Border," April 1]. Liberals, already in shock because Fox rose to challenge their absolute rule over the TV media, clearly feel threatened when one of their own, such as CNN, allows a little fresh air to leak in. ARTHUR HANSL Santa Monica TIM RUTTEN has strong opinions, which he expresses in The Times without diminishing the paper's journalistic integrity.
NEWS
December 15, 2005 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
IN a move that has drawn fire from some journalism organizations, a Wisconsin radio station has agreed to join the ranks of everything from college football bowl games to public school scoreboards by selling the naming rights of its newsroom to a business. Beginning Jan. 1, the WIBA-FM newsroom in Madison, Wis., will become known as the Amcore Bank News Center. The station is one of more than 1,200 owned by the nation's largest radio broadcaster, San Antonio-based Clear Channel Communications.
OPINION
February 21, 2005
Re "Jailing Journalists," editorial, Feb. 17: Journalistic integrity would seem to rely on individuals to maintain the trust of their sources. If, of course, their sources are inaccurate or willfully misleading, this presents another problem. In the case of the deliberate leak of a CIA agent's name by "someone of influence" in the White House, accountability seems to reside in the total chain of information. Protecting sources is essential. What to do in the case of malicious intent requires a deeper scrutiny of journalistic responsibility and accountability in attaining information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2003 | Steve Lopez
He sits on the edge of the bed, leering into the camera with lizard eyes. She lies behind him, passed out, her face turned away and her dress drawn up high. I lost count of how many times this sicko scene was repeated Wednesday night on a CBS "news" show called "48 Hours Investigates," but I'd say at least a half dozen. As if viewers might have forgotten seeing it six minutes earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2001
Brian Lowry's article, "And Now a Word From Our Anchor" (Oct. 14) raised significant issues and concerns of journalistic integrity that newscasters in Los Angeles grapple with on a daily basis. The Los Angeles local of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, AFL-CIO, represents the on-air professional news, weather, sports and talk-show staff broadcasters at most of the stations mentioned in Mr. Lowry's article. A distinction needs to be made between explicit product endorsements and the reading of commercials on these stations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1999
The separation of powers employed in your "Crossing the Line" special section is exemplary and long overdue (Dec. 20). The Times necessarily shifts from a "watchdog" status to a propagandistic arm of business when profit-minded executives are allowed to control its content. There should be a similar separation of the business entity and news content, to include not letting the brass read the articles before publication in all pieces about advertisers, parent or subsidiary companies and companies or entities (like the Staples Center)
OPINION
October 10, 1999 | RUSS BAKER, Russ Baker is a New York-based journalist who has written about Rupert Murdoch's Chinese interests in the Columbia Journalism Review
Viacom Chairman Sumner Redstone, in China for the celebration of 50 years of communist rule, advised international news organizations to avoid offending sensitive governments. "Journalistic integrity must prevail in the final analysis," he said. "But that doesn't mean that journalistic integrity should be exercised in a way that is unnecessarily offensive to the countries in which you operate."
OPINION
October 10, 1999 | RUSS BAKER, Russ Baker is a New York-based journalist who has written about Rupert Murdoch's Chinese interests in the Columbia Journalism Review
Viacom Chairman Sumner Redstone, in China for the celebration of 50 years of communist rule, advised international news organizations to avoid offending sensitive governments. "Journalistic integrity must prevail in the final analysis," he said. "But that doesn't mean that journalistic integrity should be exercised in a way that is unnecessarily offensive to the countries in which you operate."
SPORTS
August 15, 1998
I am a schoolteacher, and after reading the "Mouth from the South," I thought of an equation for T.J. Simers: Assumption of controversy plus loaded questions divided by personal jealousy equals poor sports journalism. I am envious of T.J.'s forum. After all, he is a featured writer for a major-market newspaper. He has access to a world that is inaccessible to 99% of the public. It would seem to me that all he has to do is show up, write his stories and eat the free food the clubs provide.
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