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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1989 | From Associated Press
Two journalists working for international news agencies have lost their credentials to report from Bahrain and one is being expelled, a newspaper reported Friday. The Ministry of Information took the action against Salim Yassine, deputy manager of Agence France-Presse's regional office in Bahrain, and Mariam al Khalifa of Reuters, a member of Bahrain's ruling family, the Gulf Daily News reported. It quoted an unidentified ministry official as saying that Yassine's residency also has been terminated and that he is expected to leave the island nation by the end of the month.
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NEWS
May 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
Nine foreign journalists were expelled Wednesday, accused by the government of spreading misinformation on the political crisis, a government spokesman said. "These foreign correspondents have been misinforming in their dispatches on the electoral process. Consequently, the Social Communications Media Bureau has decided to ask them to leave the country immediately," Luis Romero Villalobos, the bureau director, told reporters. Among those expelled were Charles Jaco, an American working for Cable News Network, and Michael Drudge and Ruben del Castillo of the U.S. government's Voice of America, Romero said.
WORLD
March 17, 2011 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The New York Times reported Wednesday that four of its journalists covering the fighting in Libya were missing. The newspaper said it had received secondhand information that reporters Anthony Shadid and Stephen Farrell and photographers Tyler Hicks and Lynsey Addario had been picked up by government forces near Ajdabiya. "We have talked with officials of the Libyan government in Tripoli, and they tell us they are attempting to ascertain the whereabouts of our journalists," said Bill Keller, the paper's editor.
WORLD
January 9, 2014 | By Laura King
CAIRO -- Qatar-based broadcaster Al Jazeera said Thursday that three of its journalists, detained by Egyptian authorities on Dec. 29, had been remanded to an additional 15 days in custody. The three, two of whom hold foreign passports, have been accused of harming Egypt's state security and having links with the Muslim Brotherhood. All work for Al Jazeera's English-language service. The broadcaster, in statements posted on its website, has denied any wrongdoing on the journalists' part and demanded their release.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2010 | James Rainey
America met Baghdad at the outset of the 1991 Gulf War with CNN correspondent Peter Arnett's live coverage from atop the Al Rasheed Hotel. A dozen years later, the beginning of another American war in Iraq came to us largely from reporters broadcasting live from another hotel, the Palestine. Those hotels -- complete with correspondents in the eerie light of antiaircraft fire -- have become landmarks in our collective memory. But the hotel that captured, or at least housed, the collective soul of a generation of correspondents in Iraq's wars was a stubbier, scruffier cousin, the Al Hamra.
NEWS
August 18, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Two Russian journalists who were being held hostage in Chechnya were freed on the eve of talks in Moscow between President Boris N. Yeltsin and Chechen Prime Minister Aslan Maskhadov. The kidnappers released their captives after Russian and Chechen security forces presented an ultimatum, Chechen First Deputy Prime Minister Movladi Udugov said. The journalists were seized in the breakaway region's capital, Grozny, on June 11. The Itar-Tass news agency said no ransom was paid.
WORLD
July 28, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Four journalists with Mexican news organizations remained missing Wednesday, two days after they were kidnapped in northern Mexico after covering disturbances at a troubled prison. The seizure of the journalists, representing two broadcasters and a newspaper, appeared to have been aimed at manipulating media coverage of drug gangs that are battling in the violence-plagued states of Durango and Coahuila. It was not immediately clear who carried out the kidnappings, though journalists said it probably was a trafficking group based in the state of Sinaloa that is said to hold sway at the Durango prison.
WORLD
August 6, 2009 | Raja Abdulrahim and Anna Gorman
The release came suddenly, heralded by a familiar face. In an emotional homecoming Wednesday at Bob Hope Airport in Burbank, journalist Laura Ling told family members and friends about the moment when she and her colleague, Euna Lee, knew they were about to be freed after nearly five months of detention in North Korea. "We feared that at any moment we could be sent to a hard-labor camp," Ling said. "And then suddenly we were told that we were going to a meeting.
OPINION
February 19, 2005
Re "Judges Say Reporters Must Name Sources in CIA Case," Feb. 16: Are we losing our freedom? Now I see that journalists are being targeted by right-wing bloggers and courts. How are we going to get our news if you are all tied up by this right-wing plague that is infecting our free press? How long are Americans going to sit by and watch as our money and freedoms are consumed by this government? Carolyn Kay Lopez Santa Ana Why not Robert Novak? I just don't get it. Will someone please explain it to me?
NATIONAL
May 31, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. and his top Justice Department deputies met with journalists and their lawyers Friday and pledged they would not seek to prosecute reporters under the Espionage Act for reporting and writing stories that may disclose classified information. Holder and his aides also said they were looking closely at the department's guidelines that govern how prosecutors can seek information from journalists and news organizations. The officials focused particularly on provisions in the current rules that in some cases allow the government to obtain records regarding a reporter's telephone calls or emails.
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