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Jousting

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NEWS
October 28, 2001 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A knight of the Table Round should be invincible Succeed where a less fantastic man would fail Climb a wall no one else can climb Cleave a dragon in record time Swim a moat in a coat of heavy iron mail. --"C'est Moi" from "Camelot" * It is a blazing 102 degrees outside. Still, layer by layer on it goes, about 100 pounds of armor and weaponry: shirts, leather vests, chain mail, metal greaves to protect legs, gauntlets over hands, steel helmets. After that, shields and 13-foot lances.
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TRAVEL
February 23, 2014
Stunning photos and report on the Anasazi ruins of Cedar Mesa, Utah ["Rock of Ages" by David Kelly, Feb. 16]. Thank you. I went to Natural Bridges National Monument; now I'll go back and explore more ruins. The drive on Highway 261 south off the edge of Cedar Mesa into Mexican Hat is not for the faint of heart. They're not kidding when they recommend 5 mph. Anne Eggebroten Santa Monica Trust your map, or your spouse? Regarding the Letters column ["Women Can Read Maps Just Fine," Feb. 16]
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NEWS
September 15, 2002 | IAN SHAPIRA, WASHINGTON POST
Antonio Hernandez picked up his first lance just last week, but no one at the annual jousting tournament in the genteel Virginia town of Hume could tell he was a rookie. In practice heats, he was looking deft at the sport, charging 100 yards on his faithful steed and spearing shower-curtain-ring-size loops dangling from wood posts. Hernandez, a.k.a. the Riverton Knight of Paddington farm, quickly became a crowd favorite at the Leeds Ruritan Club jousting tournament last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2013 | By DiAngelea Millar
The Red Knight gallops onto the battlefield astride a chestnut horse. Fifty feet away, the Green Knight squares off against him. Lances at the ready, the two horsemen charge each other to the blare of trumpets and the cheers from hundreds of lords and ladies (many of them very small lords and ladies). This could be an English meadow 600 summers ago. Instead, it's a concrete facsimile of a medieval castle plopped down on a busy street in Buena Park. And the man underneath those crimson robes isn't really the Red Knight - he's William Elliot III, 35, who grew up in Orange County and once dreamed of becoming a magician.
WORLD
September 2, 2008 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
Behold the king of the boat jousters. The man-mountain stands silhouetted against the Mediterranean sun, gliding past spectators lining a canal: Aurelien Evangelisti, a.k.a. The Centurion, a Gallic Goliath of Italian and Maltese descent, a baby-faced, hook-nosed Hercules clad head to toe in nautical white, the heavyweight champion of a curious sporting spectacle that has defined this hard-working port town since the 17th century. Evangelisti plants a trunk-like leg behind him on the tintaine, a platform atop the stern of a boat propelled by 10 oarsmen.
NEWS
February 3, 1986 | BILL MANSON
'Tis a wondrous sight to behold, to be sure. Cross a stream from where 20th-Century picnickers sit and suddenly you are in the midst of a Field of Revels and Tournament blazing with color in the late morning sunshine. Everyone is resplendent in chain mail, robes, swirling hats, iron helmets, red velvet shawls. There are knights and their ladies. It's the Society for Creative Anachronism, traveling back to the Middle Ages, for . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2009 | Michael Finnegan
The battle for the Republican nomination to succeed Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger took a nasty turn Saturday as a trio of Silicon Valley candidates tussled over fiscal plans and contender Meg Whitman's apparent failure to vote until she was 46 years old. Most aggressive was state Insurance Commissioner Steve Poizner, a mapping software mogul who called on Whitman to drop out of the race for the good of the party. The former chief executive of EBay, he argued, would lead Republicans to certain defeat in a general election, thanks to the civic indifference indicated by her voting record.
NEWS
December 31, 1988 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN
Though many of the equestrian riders in the Rose Parade are dressed in fancy duds and their mounts prance proudly to the music, parade viewers "never get to see how talented these folk are by watching the parade," says George Chatigny of the L.A. Equestrian Center.
OPINION
April 26, 1987
Congressional supporters of trade protectionism are not without their allies in Tokyo. That was made clear again last week when Special Trade Representative Clayton K. Yeutter and Agriculture Secretary Richard E. Lyng, on separate missions to Japan to promote increased purchases of U.S. products, publicly expressed "frustration" and "disappointment" at their lack of progress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1998 | MAIGIA-LIISA NAGARAJAN
The Middle Ages will come to the Conejo Valley next week when a nonprofit educational group hosts a jousting tournament with fully armored knights, war horses, colorful pennants and pageantry. The Grand Tournament of Hope is scheduled Thursday and Friday as a school assembly event from 10 to 11 a.m. on three campuses: Conejo Valley High, 1872 Newbury Road in Newbury Park; Redwood Intermediate, 233 Gainsboro Road in Thousand Oaks, and Weathersfield School, 3151 Darlington Drive in Thousand Oaks.
SCIENCE
July 4, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
The meek shall inherit the Earth, and that may not be a good thing, if the meek are cyanobacteria. It turns out that the ancient microbes lowest on Earth's food chain are sensitive sorts. Familiar strains of these organisms that provide "biological services" essential to complex life are about to lose the competition for a viable niche in a world turned warmer and more carbon-rich, according to two new studies. And the strains poised to dominate in the desert and ocean remain mysterious and largely unstudied.
NATIONAL
October 27, 2012 | By Seema Mehta and Michael A. Memoli, Los Angeles Times
KISSIMMEE, Fla. - Mitt Romney's record as governor of Massachusetts was the focal point of presidential campaign sparring on Saturday, with the GOP nominee boasting that he worked across the aisle to close a multibillion-dollar budget gap and President Obama arguing that his tenure benefited the wealthy at the expense of the middle class. Romney, speaking to thousands in a plane hangar in Kissimmee, said Washington needed bipartisan collaboration to fix the nation's problems, and he pointed to his record in Massachusetts working with a legislature that was 85% Democratic.
SPORTS
February 7, 2012 | Chris Erskine
Here's the instruction book for the newest/oldest/oddest sport you'll hear-ye, hear-ye about today: First, you dress like a Buick. Next, you mount a horse. (I know what you're thinking — nothing out of the ordinary so far.) Third, you charge at full gallop toward your opponent, then attempt to bosom him off his horse with an 11-foot lance. You get 10 points if you "de-horse" him (my new favorite verb). Five points if you shatter your lance against the opposing tin man. If you woke up this morning thinking that life no longer excites you, that Wednesday is the same as Thursday, that there's nothing to hold your attention now that football season has expired, meet full metal jousting, a renaissance of the Renaissance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
This city's preferred civic image is that of a quiet village with pristine beaches, trendy shops and upscale homes on tree-lined streets. The state-owned Del Mar Fairgrounds, on the city's northern edge, is another matter. The entertainment complex is mostly known for the annual San Diego County Fair and Thoroughbred racing season. But there are also the gun shows, reptile shows, boat shows, horse shows, bingo, the gay rodeo, soccer matches, concerts and, soon, the largest dog show west of the Mississippi.
FOOD
July 9, 2010 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As farmers markets and their sales have burgeoned in Southern California, the rights to sell at them — at least at the more successful venues — have become increasingly valuable, and in several cases, matters of contention. Witness the recent squabbles at the South Pasadena market, where slots for vendors, fees, integrity and management are at stake. It's a story of more than local interest, because the same issues, typically below the radar of the general public, frequently come into play at other markets.
WORLD
December 23, 2009 | By Edmund Sanders
The government of Israel seems to be embracing the Christmas spirit. This week it is organizing carols and tree giveaways in Jerusalem, bus service to Bethlehem and even a fireworks show in Nazareth with an apparent eye on burnishing the nation's reputation for religious diversity. But Israel won't be giving the Christmas gift near the top of the Vatican's wish list this year: possession of a Mt. Zion holy site where Jesus is believed to have gathered his disciples for the Last Supper.
NEWS
December 25, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's 10 a.m. on a Wednesday, and about 100 tourists and two dozen lawyers have won seats for some of the best theater in town. To the marshal's call of "Oyez, oyez, oyez," the nine justices of the Supreme Court emerge from behind a red curtain and take their seats at the bench. Then the contest begins. Unlike a typical House or Senate hearing, the justices do not show up to deliver a prepared speech or to ask questions written in advance by staff members.
NATIONAL
January 4, 2007 | Noam N. Levey, Times Staff Writer
Eager to set themselves apart from a Republican-led Congress tarnished by scandal, Democrats outlined a plan Wednesday to end the secrecy around earmarks inserted in legislation to funnel public money to favored interests. "We're going to stamp out corruption, and the proof is in the package," Rep. Louise M. Slaughter (D-N.Y.) said as she outlined reform measures that Democrats would put to a vote today and Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2009 | Michael Finnegan
The battle for the Republican nomination to succeed Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger took a nasty turn Saturday as a trio of Silicon Valley candidates tussled over fiscal plans and contender Meg Whitman's apparent failure to vote until she was 46 years old. Most aggressive was state Insurance Commissioner Steve Poizner, a mapping software mogul who called on Whitman to drop out of the race for the good of the party. The former chief executive of EBay, he argued, would lead Republicans to certain defeat in a general election, thanks to the civic indifference indicated by her voting record.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
As one of an insufficiently large number of fans of Rob Thomas' romantic dramedy "Cupid," which starred Jeremy Piven and Paula Marshall and aired only 14 episodes before being canceled by ABC in 1999, I greeted with mixed feelings the news of its retooled return. In the whole history of remakes, there have been few that have seemed worth the effort -- the recently concluded "Battlestar Galactica" and Hitchcock's second "The Man Who Knew Too Much" come to mind, and then . . . I'm out.
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