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Jovanka Bach

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2006 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Jovanka Bach, a Southern California playwright and physician whose stream of dramas included a trilogy spanning half a century of turmoil in her ancestral homeland of Montenegro in the former Yugoslavia, has died. She was 69. Bach, who balanced her two callings for more than 30 years, died Thursday in an Ojai nursing center of complications from ovarian cancer, according to her brother, Danilo Bach. She was diagnosed with the disease three years ago.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2006 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Jovanka Bach, a Southern California playwright and physician whose stream of dramas included a trilogy spanning half a century of turmoil in her ancestral homeland of Montenegro in the former Yugoslavia, has died. She was 69. Bach, who balanced her two callings for more than 30 years, died Thursday in an Ojai nursing center of complications from ovarian cancer, according to her brother, Danilo Bach. She was diagnosed with the disease three years ago.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1995 | Janice Arkatov, Janice Arkatov is a regular contributor to Calendar
You may get a little history lesson about the former Yugoslavia in Jovanka Bach's "Name Day," but that's not the point. "The focus of my story is on the consequences of war," says the Santa Monica-based playwright, whose nine-character drama opens Saturday as a guest production at the Odyssey Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1995 | Janice Arkatov, Janice Arkatov is a regular contributor to Calendar
You may get a little history lesson about the former Yugoslavia in Jovanka Bach's "Name Day," but that's not the point. "The focus of my story is on the consequences of war," says the Santa Monica-based playwright, whose nine-character drama opens Saturday as a guest production at the Odyssey Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2001 | JANA J. MONJI
For all its well-intentioned themes, "Marko the Prince," Jovanka Bach's last installment of her "Balkan Trilogy," is clumsily written and director John Stark's cast never convincingly creates the emotional trauma and questionable honor-driven loyalties of a war-torn country. Marko is a mythic hero whom the protagonist, Chicha (Tulsey Ball), patterns himself after. Yet despite the presence of a guslar (Jacob Witkin), a wandering balladeer who serves as a narrator, the parallelism isn't clear.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1999 | JANA J. MONJI
Considering the current conditions in the Balkans, one wants to like Jovanka Bach's new drama, "A Thousand Souls," at the Odyssey Theatre. Yet after enduring nearly three hours of numerous blackouts between the endless scene changes and meandering plot lines, one loses that desire. Set in 1991, an American banker, Misho (Christopher Franciosa), spirits away his mother's body to bury her in the ancestral cemetery in the old country, as he had promised.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1995 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The bombshells in "Name Day," Jovanka Bach's 1985 drama about Americanized Serbian families, aren't the kind of mortar fire we've come to associate with the present-day Balkans, but they're devastating nonetheless. On the more personalized battlefield of the L.A. suburbs, Bach burrows into the carefully framed particulars of an individual grievance to reveal the psychological scars of perpetual warfare in that historically troubled region.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1988 | RAY LOYND
Anton Chekhov's health is deteriorating. He is living with his younger sister, Maria, in Yalta and desperately trying to finish "The Three Sisters." They're clamoring for it back at the Moscow Art Theatre, where Chekhov's bride, the actress Olga Knipper, has been cast as one of the leads. We never see Olga. Playwright Jovanka Bach's "Chekhov and Maria," at the New Playwrights Foundation, features only the entitled characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2006 | David C. Nichols; Charlotte Stoudt; Daryl H. Miller;
In the hilarious opening number of "Bukowsical!" running at Sacred Fools, we are informed, "there's a little Bukowski in all of you too." That sounds about right. Actor Steven Memel, playing, why, Steven Memel, welcomes us to "the Sacred Angel Fist Circle of Note Gang Theatre Company's final backer's audition," and take-no-prisoners pandemonium ensues. That is the intention.
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