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Joy Division

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September 23, 2004 | Scott Timberg
On the surface of it, the dark, '80s-sounding band led by L.A.'s Brent Rademaker seems like a new direction for the canyon-rocker best known for his dusty, mellow work with Beachwood Sparks and the Tyde. But the thinking behind Frausdots, formed with girlfriend Michelle Loiselle and with pinch-hitting by Mia Doi Todd and members of the Cure and Brian Jonestown Massacre, goes back a long way. "I'm 40 years old," Rademaker says. "I grew up with post-punk.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Those who have regularly attended South by Southwest probably know the feeling that can occur as the annual music festival closes: a sense that, for all the wondrous music that poured into the ears, you somehow failed. Failed because you missed the spectacle, for example, of Lady Gaga getting puked on, arrived too late in the week to catch Jay Z and Kanye West or missed [insert buzz band here]. Failed because, as a writer in search of drama, it should have obvious to me to trail rapper Tyler, the Creator at least for a while, because he'd likely incite a riot.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Unknown Pleasures Inside Joy Division Peter Hook It Books: 416 pp., $27.99 In the three decades since he committed suicide, singer Ian Curtis has become both a symbol and a caricature. Curtis' seemingly tortured life as a member of the English post-punk band Joy Division and early death in 1980 have been transformed into myth and Curtis into a modern-day Thomas Chatterton or Sylvia Plath. His life offers a perfect narrative for disaffected, sun-averse souls the world over: a young genius too pure to live.
NEWS
August 17, 2013 | By Kari Howard
I was talking with one of my old correspondents the other day about a writer's “voice.” Daily journalism may subdue that voice a bit, but in the Great Reads, I feel very Auntie Mame exclamation-pointish on the matter: Give me more! He sent me Saul Bellow's thoughts on the subject: “It seems to issue from the bosom, from a place beneath the breastbone. It is more musical than verbal, and it is the characteristic signature of a person, of a soul.” Beyond being beautiful, the quote moved me because it echoed a (slightly loopy)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2007 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
More than three decades have passed since Joy Division emerged from the cultural rubble of post-industrial Manchester, England to rechannel punk rock's sound and fury into something more sublime. Over the group's fleeting, three-year existence, its lyrics connected with fans by conveying emotional isolation and existential despair while the music arrived with the visceral impact of shattering glass.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2008 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
Most rock biopics are in the business of grandiosity and inflation, but "Control" -- Anton Corbijn's spare, laconic portrait of Ian Curtis, the late singer of Manchester post-punk heroes Joy Division -- does quite the opposite: It creates a life-size version of an iconic figure. "Control," which the Weinstein Co. is releasing on DVD on Tuesday, keeps its focus on the man and the milestones in his short life: marriage to teenage sweetheart Deborah, a tedious job at the unemployment office, being diagnosed with epilepsy, fatherhood at a young age and, of course, the startlingly rapid ascent of Joy Division.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1995 | LORRAINE ALI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's been almost 20 years since Joy Division emerged from the grimy factory town of Manchester, England, with a form of punk so gracefully apocalyptic it seemed inevitable that the band would become not only one of rock's most influential forces, but also one of its rarest flowers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2011
Joy Division was one of the '80s' most influential bands, but after the death of singer Ian Curtis, the chances for a younger generation to hear its albums in full seemed nil. Until now. The band's irascible bassist, Peter Hook, has assembled a group to perform Joy Division's two classic albums, "Closer" and "Unknown Pleasures. " The latter gets the treatment at the El Rey on Friday night. El Rey Theatre, 5515 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. 8 p.m. Friday. $22. theelrey.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2012 | By August Brown
The legendary Manchester post-punks in New Order will play their first L.A.-area show in seven years on Oct. 7. Well, most of the classic New Order lineup will be there anyhow. The band's much-anticipated local turn (its first since headlining Coachella in 2005) will stop by the Greek Theatre on Oct. 7 and is must-see viewing for local Anglophiles and latecomers to the electronica boom ("Blue Monday" famously remains the bestselling 12-inch vinyl DJ single of all time). No on-sale date has been set yet.  Core members Bernard Sumner, Stephen Morris and Gillian Gilbert will be playing along with more recent keyboardist Phill Cunningham and bassist Tom Chapman.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1986 | RICHARD CROMELIN
"Essence & Charm." Digital Sex. Sordide Sentimental. AAD. Talk about cultures colliding! Here's an Omaha band (Digital Sex) steeped in the moody rock of post-punk England (Cure, Joy Division et al.) arriving on CD from a one-man French operation known for its support of artistic subversives (Throbbing Gristle, Psychic TV).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Unknown Pleasures Inside Joy Division Peter Hook It Books: 416 pp., $27.99 In the three decades since he committed suicide, singer Ian Curtis has become both a symbol and a caricature. Curtis' seemingly tortured life as a member of the English post-punk band Joy Division and early death in 1980 have been transformed into myth and Curtis into a modern-day Thomas Chatterton or Sylvia Plath. His life offers a perfect narrative for disaffected, sun-averse souls the world over: a young genius too pure to live.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Life is terrible. The world hates you. Even your mother and father have forsaken you. But at least there's someone who's more misunderstood than you. "Safe in your place deep in the earth/That's when they'll know what you were really worth," sings Nick Drake in "Fruit Tree," one song among hundreds addressed in "This Will End in Tears," writer Adam Brent Houghtaling's detailed survey of sad songs. Formatted as an artistic encyclopedia, the book runs from singer (and former USC professor)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2012 | By August Brown
The legendary Manchester post-punks in New Order will play their first L.A.-area show in seven years on Oct. 7. Well, most of the classic New Order lineup will be there anyhow. The band's much-anticipated local turn (its first since headlining Coachella in 2005) will stop by the Greek Theatre on Oct. 7 and is must-see viewing for local Anglophiles and latecomers to the electronica boom ("Blue Monday" famously remains the bestselling 12-inch vinyl DJ single of all time). No on-sale date has been set yet.  Core members Bernard Sumner, Stephen Morris and Gillian Gilbert will be playing along with more recent keyboardist Phill Cunningham and bassist Tom Chapman.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2011
Joy Division was one of the '80s' most influential bands, but after the death of singer Ian Curtis, the chances for a younger generation to hear its albums in full seemed nil. Until now. The band's irascible bassist, Peter Hook, has assembled a group to perform Joy Division's two classic albums, "Closer" and "Unknown Pleasures. " The latter gets the treatment at the El Rey on Friday night. El Rey Theatre, 5515 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. 8 p.m. Friday. $22. theelrey.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2010 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
The first sequence of "The American," like much of the rest of the movie, contains scarcely any dialogue. The scene unfolds in the snowy emptiness of Sweden, where Jack (George Clooney) is hiking with Ingrid (Irina Björklund), a woman whose history with Jack isn't revealed. A sniper's bullet tears through the frozen air, and in mere minutes the audience must puzzle out any number of critical questions. Who is Jack (whose real name might be Edward)? Why is someone trying to kill him?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2008 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
Most rock biopics are in the business of grandiosity and inflation, but "Control" -- Anton Corbijn's spare, laconic portrait of Ian Curtis, the late singer of Manchester post-punk heroes Joy Division -- does quite the opposite: It creates a life-size version of an iconic figure. "Control," which the Weinstein Co. is releasing on DVD on Tuesday, keeps its focus on the man and the milestones in his short life: marriage to teenage sweetheart Deborah, a tedious job at the unemployment office, being diagnosed with epilepsy, fatherhood at a young age and, of course, the startlingly rapid ascent of Joy Division.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2007 | Carina Chocano
Anton Corbijn's biopic of Ian Curtis, lead singer of Joy Division, who hanged himself at the age of 23, "Control" stars Sam Riley as the gifted and troubled musician. Shot in black and white, the film avoids the cliches of the genre through its artful composition and lingering, pensive shots. The movie is largely based on a memoir by Curtis' widow, Deborah, who co-wrote with Matt Greenhalgh.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2007 | Carina Chocano
Anton Corbijn's biopic of Ian Curtis, lead singer of Joy Division, who hanged himself at the age of 23, "Control" stars Sam Riley as the gifted and troubled musician. Shot in black and white, the film avoids the cliches of the genre through its artful composition and lingering, pensive shots. The movie is largely based on a memoir by Curtis' widow, Deborah, who co-wrote with Matt Greenhalgh.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2007 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
More than three decades have passed since Joy Division emerged from the cultural rubble of post-industrial Manchester, England to rechannel punk rock's sound and fury into something more sublime. Over the group's fleeting, three-year existence, its lyrics connected with fans by conveying emotional isolation and existential despair while the music arrived with the visceral impact of shattering glass.
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