Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJoy Horowitz
IN THE NEWS

Joy Horowitz

FEATURED ARTICLES
BOOKS
June 16, 1996 | Marion Winik, Marion Winik is the author of "First Comes Love" (Pantheon) and a commentator for National Public Radio
My favorite lines in "Tessie and Pearlie" come from near the end of the book. "Beyond love and family, which must inevitably die," writes author and world-class granddaughter Joy Horowitz, "I now understand that there is only one thing that lasts: duty. It is a duty to go on, to observe our humanness in the face of suffering. And in this ordinary purpose, extraordinary things can happen."
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
July 28, 1996
I feel I must respond to Marion Winik's June 9 review of Joy Horowitz's book, "Tessie and Pearlie: A Granddaughter's Story." Winik is correct when she states that the book "has no plot to unfold, no secrets to reveal, no thesis to prove." The reason is, these all too common features are not necessary in Horowitz's clear, heart-warming and emotional observations of her grandmothers. I, too, found that "reading this book, is very much like spending a great deal of time with one's own grandmother."
Advertisement
MAGAZINE
January 3, 1993
Thank you for publishing this sensitively written, enlightening article about drama therapy for persons with mental illness and emotional disturbances ("A Dramatic Remedy," by Joy Horowitz, Nov. 22). Equally worth noting was the lovely, non-exploitative layout. GLENN COTHAM, PRESIDENT ALLIANCE FOR THE MENTALLY ILL, VAN NUYS
BOOKS
June 16, 1996 | Marion Winik, Marion Winik is the author of "First Comes Love" (Pantheon) and a commentator for National Public Radio
My favorite lines in "Tessie and Pearlie" come from near the end of the book. "Beyond love and family, which must inevitably die," writes author and world-class granddaughter Joy Horowitz, "I now understand that there is only one thing that lasts: duty. It is a duty to go on, to observe our humanness in the face of suffering. And in this ordinary purpose, extraordinary things can happen."
MAGAZINE
December 15, 1991
I applaud the account of the efforts of Alice Callaghan ("The Savior of Skid Row," by Joy Horowitz, Nov. 10). It is very encouraging to see that not all hope is lost for these greatly disadvantaged people. I would like to thank her for giving of herself to those who so desperately need it. TIMOTHY LEE NEUMANN Irvine
MAGAZINE
June 4, 1989
Dr. Khalil Tabsh delivered my baby daughter in 1981. I fear "Dr. Amnio," by Joy Horowitz (April 23), may evoke criticism of the doctor's methods, so I write to say that we who deeply respect life should salute this physician. Since the beginning of human existence, our reproduction has involved tragic biological waste; in the cases Dr. Tabsh handles, he bravely tries to impose some order on the randomness of that waste. PHYLLIS GROPP Huntington Beach
MAGAZINE
August 27, 1989
Bravo to you on "The Defender," by Joy Horowitz (July 23). Leslie Abramson's courage and belief that one person can make a difference in this crazy world is an inspiration to us all. If there ever was a system that needs someone like Abramson to shape it up, it is the criminal justice system. We are all too happy to lock up the poor and the powerless while the powerful and affluent quietly make a back door exit with their attorney. Abramson evens up the game a bit. ANNE LINN Santa Barbara
MAGAZINE
September 20, 1987
I felt saddened by the ideas presented in "The New Shotgun Weddings" (by Joy Horowitz, Aug. 23), not for the grown-up couples whose marriage decision eludes them but for the "bargaining chips" they give birth to. Ultimately, it is the baby who makes their choice for them. This is a momentous decision for a child to make for its wary parents. And while one of the fathers remarked that the relationship with the child is etched in stone, that won't shield it from the immense potential for resentment that could begin the day it arrives from the maternity ward.
BOOKS
July 28, 1996
I feel I must respond to Marion Winik's June 9 review of Joy Horowitz's book, "Tessie and Pearlie: A Granddaughter's Story." Winik is correct when she states that the book "has no plot to unfold, no secrets to reveal, no thesis to prove." The reason is, these all too common features are not necessary in Horowitz's clear, heart-warming and emotional observations of her grandmothers. I, too, found that "reading this book, is very much like spending a great deal of time with one's own grandmother."
MAGAZINE
November 20, 1994
Bravo to Joy Horowitz for her warm and huggable portraits of her bubbes ("Greetings From Pearlie and Tessie," Oct. 16). She has earned her place in heaven for her ability to share these remarkable women with us. They are the crones who teach us by example, the goddesses who stay at the hearth and stir the noodle pudding. They are everyone's grandmothers, the ones we may have forgotten to honor. Regina Morin San Diego Old age is inevitable. Tessie and Pearlie have certainly done it with grace.
MAGAZINE
November 20, 1994
Bravo to Joy Horowitz for her warm and huggable portraits of her bubbes ("Greetings From Pearlie and Tessie," Oct. 16). She has earned her place in heaven for her ability to share these remarkable women with us. They are the crones who teach us by example, the goddesses who stay at the hearth and stir the noodle pudding. They are everyone's grandmothers, the ones we may have forgotten to honor. Regina Morin San Diego Old age is inevitable. Tessie and Pearlie have certainly done it with grace.
MAGAZINE
January 3, 1993
Thank you for publishing this sensitively written, enlightening article about drama therapy for persons with mental illness and emotional disturbances ("A Dramatic Remedy," by Joy Horowitz, Nov. 22). Equally worth noting was the lovely, non-exploitative layout. GLENN COTHAM, PRESIDENT ALLIANCE FOR THE MENTALLY ILL, VAN NUYS
MAGAZINE
December 15, 1991
I applaud the account of the efforts of Alice Callaghan ("The Savior of Skid Row," by Joy Horowitz, Nov. 10). It is very encouraging to see that not all hope is lost for these greatly disadvantaged people. I would like to thank her for giving of herself to those who so desperately need it. TIMOTHY LEE NEUMANN Irvine
MAGAZINE
September 3, 1989
"The Defender," by Joy Horowitz (July 23), was subtitled "Some Say Leslie Abramson Is the Best Female Criminal Defense Lawyer Around. Others Say She's the Best, Period." That leaves me with one question: Best what? She's a leader in keeping California killers off Death Row. Is that something to be proud of? Some of these same people will be released to kill again. Others that remain in jail feed off of tax dollars for the rest of their worthless lives. To what end? MARJORIE LYMAN, Sherman Oaks
MAGAZINE
June 4, 1989
Dr. Khalil Tabsh delivered my baby daughter in 1981. I fear "Dr. Amnio," by Joy Horowitz (April 23), may evoke criticism of the doctor's methods, so I write to say that we who deeply respect life should salute this physician. Since the beginning of human existence, our reproduction has involved tragic biological waste; in the cases Dr. Tabsh handles, he bravely tries to impose some order on the randomness of that waste. PHYLLIS GROPP Huntington Beach
MAGAZINE
September 20, 1987
I felt saddened by the ideas presented in "The New Shotgun Weddings" (by Joy Horowitz, Aug. 23), not for the grown-up couples whose marriage decision eludes them but for the "bargaining chips" they give birth to. Ultimately, it is the baby who makes their choice for them. This is a momentous decision for a child to make for its wary parents. And while one of the fathers remarked that the relationship with the child is etched in stone, that won't shield it from the immense potential for resentment that could begin the day it arrives from the maternity ward.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|