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Joy Jacobson

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NEWS
October 7, 1990 | from The Washington Post
In a January, 1987, "confidential" memorandum to Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif)., a Cranston fund-raiser wrote that savings and loan executive Charles H. Keating Jr. was among campaign supporters who "rightfully expect" some resolution of pending requests for help from the senator. Over the next few months, Cranston met several times with Keating and twice with federal thrift regulators on Keating's behalf to discuss their inquiries into Keating's Irvine, Calif., operation, Lincoln S&L.
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NEWS
December 4, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sen. Daniel K. Inouye (D-Hawaii), making an unusual appearance as a character witness Monday, said that the "Keating Five" are guilty only of fighting for a constituent with "vigor and aggressiveness." He told the Ethics Committee: "The political realities of life dictate (that) whatever we do should please our constituents." If Lincoln Savings & Loan had not failed, "these men would be heroes to their constituents . . . . Today, they are attacked because the endeavor failed."
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NEWS
December 4, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A fund-raiser for Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) acknowledged Monday in testimony before the Senate Ethics Committee that she wrote three memos in 1987 and 1988 that appear to link nearly $1 million in contributions from Lincoln Savings & Loan owner Charles H. Keating Jr. with actions by the senator on Keating's behalf.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A fund-raiser for Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) acknowledged Monday in testimony before the Senate Ethics Committee that she wrote three memos in 1987 and 1988 that appear to link nearly $1 million in contributions from Lincoln Savings & Loan owner Charles H. Keating Jr. with actions by the senator on Keating's behalf.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sen. Daniel K. Inouye (D-Hawaii), making an unusual appearance as a character witness Monday, said that the "Keating Five" are guilty only of fighting for a constituent with "vigor and aggressiveness." He told the Ethics Committee: "The political realities of life dictate (that) whatever we do should please our constituents." If Lincoln Savings & Loan had not failed, "these men would be heroes to their constituents . . . . Today, they are attacked because the endeavor failed."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1990
The Senate Ethics Committee may or may not conclude that California's Alan Cranston and others among the so-called "Keating Five" violated their chamber's standards of conduct when they intervened with federal regulators on behalf of Lincoln Savings & Loan's former owner. But whatever the committee's decision, the testimony it has taken paints an intolerably squalid picture of business-as-usual in "the world's greatest deliberative body."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The lime-green signs on the box-office window warn of "MATURE SUBJECT MATTER." But in the case of "Death Defying Acts," a 1995 trio of one-act comedies now at the International City Theatre in Long Beach, Woody Allen recycling an unfortunate joke about the difference between sushi and, well, something else doesn't necessarily indicate maturity. Of any kind. Sign-wise, COARSE AND TIRED ONE-LINERS might be more like it.
NEWS
October 17, 1990 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.), one of five senators accused of improperly intervening with regulators on behalf of Lincoln Savings & Loan owner Charles H. Keating Jr., was summoned before the Senate Ethics Committee on Tuesday to review the case against him amid indications that the panel is on the verge of dropping charges against two of his colleagues. The investigation of Cranston will continue, sources said, even if the panel soon votes--as expected--to clear Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.
NEWS
January 31, 1986 | KEITH LOVE, Times Political Writer
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) raised $2.1 million in the last six months of 1985 for his 1986 reelection campaign, copies of federal election reports show. In all, the senator raised $3.3 million in 1985--a very good year even for Cranston, one of the most effective fund-raisers in U.S. Senate history. "We are pleased but we must raise more," said Cranston campaign manager Darry Sragow. "We think Alan will need about $6 million to win in November."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2000 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nobody performs Gertrude Stein these days, and it's fair to wonder if anyone reads her either. Once the seminal voice of the American-in-Paris avant garde of the 1920s, Stein has long been reduced in pop culture to being Alice B. Toklas' companion and to a single line, her patented dismissal of Oakland: "There is no there there." But even if you know only that line, you already have a grasp of Stein's unique way with English.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | from The Washington Post
In a January, 1987, "confidential" memorandum to Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif)., a Cranston fund-raiser wrote that savings and loan executive Charles H. Keating Jr. was among campaign supporters who "rightfully expect" some resolution of pending requests for help from the senator. Over the next few months, Cranston met several times with Keating and twice with federal thrift regulators on Keating's behalf to discuss their inquiries into Keating's Irvine, Calif., operation, Lincoln S&L.
NEWS
November 17, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On four occasions, Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) solicited big campaign contributions from Lincoln Savings & Loan owner Charles H. Keating Jr. while consenting to Keating's request for assistance in battling federal regulators, the Senate Ethics Committee's chief investigator said Friday.
NEWS
April 18, 1986 | KEITH LOVE and JOHN BALZAR, Times Political Writers
For the seven contenders in the Republican U.S. Senate primary, this was the week to turn over the cards in their high-stakes poker game, showing who has been raising money as the race heads into the homestretch. The leader, according to federal reports, is Rep. Ed Zschau of Los Altos, who pulled in $593,000 in the Jan. 1 to March 31 filing period. He is the only GOP candidate beginning to show a statewide fund-raising base.
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