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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Swoosie Kurtz, who plays Melissa McCarthy's outrageous mother, Joyce, on the hit CBS sitcom "Mike & Molly," got her first lesson in the fickleness of show business more than 50 years ago in a production of Thornton Wilder's "The Skin of Our Teeth" at Hollywood High School. "We were backstage after the performance getting ready to meet our families when I was told there was a man who wants to see you, Eddie Foy III," said Kurtz, relaxing on a red sofa that matches her hair in her dressing room at Warner Bros.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - Justice Joyce L. Kennard, a Republican appointee who forged a largely liberal path on the California Supreme Court, announced Tuesday she will retire April 5, giving Gov. Jerry Brown another chance to put his mark on the state's highest court. Kennard, 72, is the court's longest-serving justice, with a 25-year tenure. She has been regarded as a highly independent judge, often siding with the underdog. Though she owed her place on the top court to former Gov. George Deukmejian, a law-and-order conservative, she bucked expectations and sided so often with the late liberal Justice Stanley Mosk that the pair was dubbed "the odd couple.
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BOOKS
August 12, 1990
I was very happy to see the article by Nora Joyce-biographer, Brenda Maddox, in the July 22 Book Review. As an avid Joycean who doesn't really fit into any of Maddox's categories, I enjoyed reading the comparison and the characterizations of conference-goers. I was shocked, however, to see the title of Joyce's last work manhandled. ROBYN L. BEZAR INCLINE VILLAGE, NV Editor's Note: Lawrence died in Vence, France; not Venice, Italy. The title of Joyce's last work is "Finnegans Wake," not "Finnegan's Wake."
SPORTS
November 20, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
There is a leftover tidbit to this year's World Series Game 3, when umpire Jim Joyce called obstruction at third base to end the game and send the Boston Red Sox to defeat. When Joyce's father died in 2009, among the things buried with him was a Red Sox cap. "He was flipping over in his grave when I made that call," Joyce says. There are umpires and there is Jim Joyce. He doesn't want to be special, other than to have people know he does a good job. But a triangle of fate and circumstance has singled him out. Oct. 26, 2013, St. Louis, World Series Game 3 The Cardinals and Red Sox were tied in the ninth inning, 4-4, when Boston catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia rose from tagging out Yadier Molina at the plate to see Allen Craig running toward third base.
NEWS
October 12, 1986
It's a shame that the very talented writer Steven Bochco feels he must spice up every scene with incessant sexual innuendoes. "Hill Street Blues," "L.A. Law." Different settings, same tired results. Joyce and Ray Martin, Burbank
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2001 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Afragmented cautionary tale, Christopher Joyce's "Kill Switch" at the Ventura Court attempts to show the grit under the glitz of Hollywood. Unfortunately, instead of affording a peek into Wilson Mizner's fabled sewer, Joyce's glass-bottomed boat only skims a muddy pond. It's a thankless tour, overlong and circuitous.
NEWS
April 17, 1988
"The New Dating Game" host has got to go. First it was Joyce what's-her-name; now there is Jeff MacGregor. He is too cocky and makes unnecessary comments throughout the show. Until a better host is on, the "Dating Game" is off in our house. Kelly Coughlin, La Verne
OPINION
March 30, 2012 | By Daniel J. Stone
Mitt Romney marked the second anniversary of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act by calling for its repeal. Referring to the act as "an unfolding disaster," he advocated free-market initiatives to improve access to care. Yet Romney never explained how the free market could help uninsured individuals like my longtime patient Joyce. Joyce, a diabetic in her 60s, works for a Los Angeles church and spends much of her time doing charitable work in Africa. The church does not offer health insurance.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1991
William Bradley Lemery, owner of Photowest/Brad Lemery Gallery in downtown San Diego, died April 9 at Mercy Hospital. He was 39. No cause of death was given. Lemery opened his gallery in 1989, featuring 19th- and 20th-Century photographers, both local and international, whose work ranged from gritty realism to romantic self-portraiture. Lemery was raised in Upstate New York and studied to be a video artist in Canada.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1999
Re "Cigarette Sales Off 29% in State Since 50-Cent Tax Hike," Sept. 14: If Stanton Glantz thinks that "to get from California to anywhere else (to buy cigarettes) you're going across a mountain or a desert or through a big bunch of trees," then he obviously has never used a telephone and a credit card or the Internet and a credit card. JOYCE ROSE Torrance
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
Sarah Cifarelli stands in front of a series of detailed pen-and-ink drawings by L.A. artist Deborah Aschheim titled "My Life in Airports. " The installation, which features row after row of familiar vignettes - security lines, baggage claims, shuttle rides, airport architecture, is installed in Terminal 1 by Gate 2 at LAX. Aschheim's work is part of a larger airport-wide art initiative called "Influx. " It features 11 original, site-specific installations and the work of 45 local artists including Eileen Cowin, Jorge Oswaldo and Cynthia Minet.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Inkoo Kang
Any one-man crusade is likely to fail, but a rom-com character's war against sincerity is doomed from the start. Recently unemployed David (pastor-turned-actor Joe Boyd) has good reasons for being a Negative Nancy, and his aloofness earns him early triumphs over the omnipresent forces of perkiness and optimism. But writer-director Brad Wise's "A Strange Brand of Happy" is determined to make David experience the film's titular emotion: delight in the knowledge that fulfilling one's potential pleases God too. So along comes a lady ex machina in life coach Joyce (Christian singer Rebecca St. James, mugging her heart out)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2013 | By Philip Brandes
We all have a yearning for a coherent narrative in life, maintains Joyce Carol Oates, but that illusory comfort is off the table in her one-act play, “Tone Clusters,” at Will Geer's Theatricum Botanicum. For anyone familiar with Oates' fiction, it will come as no surprise that the piece is dark, elliptical and uncompromising in its intellectual rigor. Written in 1990, it also proved eerily prescient in depicting the media's ever-increasing voracious and invasive exploitation of tragedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Joyce Maynard was intrigued when filmmaker Shane Salerno first came calling with his interest in interviewing her for his documentary on J.D. Salinger. Naturally, Maynard was cautious considering she is a well-regarded author of eight novels and a series of memoirs yet is still probably best known for her relationship with Salinger, which she documented in her 1998 memoir, "At Home in the World. " Yet Salerno, who began courting Maynard seven or eight years ago, kept at it until Maynard agreed to be interviewed in her home in California in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
What do a National Book Award-winning novelist and popular TV host Stephen Colbert talk about when they get together? "Fifty Shades of Grey," of course. And also James Joyce. Colum McCann, who won the National Book Award for his novel "Let the Great World Spin," appeared on the Colbert Report last week and it's too good to miss. Not because it's Colbert's funniest segment -- it's not -- but in it he really seems to want to talk about books. Colbert says that has read James Joyce's "Ulysses" but not E.L. James "Fifty Shades of Grey" (though that may have changed .)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Susan King
Psychologist and columnist Dr. Joyce Brothers, who died Monday at the age of 85, won the top prize in 1955 on the popular TV game show "The $64,000 Question" on the subject of boxing. Smart, attractive and fearless, Brothers' media career quickly skyrocketed. Along with offering advice and expertise on countless talk shows for nearly six decades, Brothers had a secondary and lucrative career appearing as herself and as an actress in TV series and feature films including "The Love Boat," "Love, American Style," "The Munsters Today," "Baywatch,"  "The Larry Sanders Show," "The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour," "Exit to Eden," "Dear God," "The Howard Stern Show" and the 1993 episode "Last Exit to Springfield" on Fox's "The Simpsons.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1999 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Originally written for radio in 1964, Joe Orton's "The Ruffian on the Stair" proves a somewhat checkered inaugural production for the Lillian Theatre in Hollywood. A brief but action-packed one-act, Orton's compact and black-edged comedy bristles with a more overt street sensibility than Orton's full-length works, which employ petit bourgeois characters of the most venal stripe to skewer notions of middle-class respectability.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Inkoo Kang
Any one-man crusade is likely to fail, but a rom-com character's war against sincerity is doomed from the start. Recently unemployed David (pastor-turned-actor Joe Boyd) has good reasons for being a Negative Nancy, and his aloofness earns him early triumphs over the omnipresent forces of perkiness and optimism. But writer-director Brad Wise's "A Strange Brand of Happy" is determined to make David experience the film's titular emotion: delight in the knowledge that fulfilling one's potential pleases God too. So along comes a lady ex machina in life coach Joyce (Christian singer Rebecca St. James, mugging her heart out)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Valerie J. Nelson
Dr. Joyce Brothers, a psychologist who became a pop-culture fixture after she turned to radio and television in the late 1950s to tend to the nation's psyche, has died. She was 85. Brothers died Monday in New York City, publicist Sanford Brokaw told the Associated Press. No cause was given. By ministering to America via the airwaves and in print, Brothers helped bring psychology into the mainstream of society, according to the American Psychological Assn. PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2013 When Brothers' psychological expertise was first showcased on NBC in 1958, she “paved the way for others in her field to bring their talents to television,” according to the Paley Center for Media Study in New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2013 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Fame was never her intent, Dr. Joyce Brothers often said. She was not yet 30, new to stay-at-home motherhood and struggling to help her husband stretch his pay as a medical resident when she came up with an ambitious plan: Transform herself into a boxing expert and try out for "The $64,000 Question," a popular 1950s television quiz show. "Gee, a loser on those shows gets a Cadillac," she once recalled, "and I could be a loser. " Instead, she won big and used her instant celebrity to establish a new media specialty - pop psychology.
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