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Joyce Brothers

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Susan King
Psychologist and columnist Dr. Joyce Brothers, who died Monday at the age of 85, won the top prize in 1955 on the popular TV game show "The $64,000 Question" on the subject of boxing. Smart, attractive and fearless, Brothers' media career quickly skyrocketed. Along with offering advice and expertise on countless talk shows for nearly six decades, Brothers had a secondary and lucrative career appearing as herself and as an actress in TV series and feature films including "The Love Boat," "Love, American Style," "The Munsters Today," "Baywatch,"  "The Larry Sanders Show," "The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour," "Exit to Eden," "Dear God," "The Howard Stern Show" and the 1993 episode "Last Exit to Springfield" on Fox's "The Simpsons.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Susan King
Psychologist and columnist Dr. Joyce Brothers, who died Monday at the age of 85, won the top prize in 1955 on the popular TV game show "The $64,000 Question" on the subject of boxing. Smart, attractive and fearless, Brothers' media career quickly skyrocketed. Along with offering advice and expertise on countless talk shows for nearly six decades, Brothers had a secondary and lucrative career appearing as herself and as an actress in TV series and feature films including "The Love Boat," "Love, American Style," "The Munsters Today," "Baywatch,"  "The Larry Sanders Show," "The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour," "Exit to Eden," "Dear God," "The Howard Stern Show" and the 1993 episode "Last Exit to Springfield" on Fox's "The Simpsons.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Valerie J. Nelson
Dr. Joyce Brothers, a psychologist who became a pop-culture fixture after she turned to radio and television in the late 1950s to tend to the nation's psyche, has died. She was 85. Brothers died Monday in New York City, publicist Sanford Brokaw told the Associated Press. No cause was given. By ministering to America via the airwaves and in print, Brothers helped bring psychology into the mainstream of society, according to the American Psychological Assn. PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2013 When Brothers' psychological expertise was first showcased on NBC in 1958, she “paved the way for others in her field to bring their talents to television,” according to the Paley Center for Media Study in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Valerie J. Nelson
Dr. Joyce Brothers, a psychologist who became a pop-culture fixture after she turned to radio and television in the late 1950s to tend to the nation's psyche, has died. She was 85. Brothers died Monday in New York City, publicist Sanford Brokaw told the Associated Press. No cause was given. By ministering to America via the airwaves and in print, Brothers helped bring psychology into the mainstream of society, according to the American Psychological Assn. PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2013 When Brothers' psychological expertise was first showcased on NBC in 1958, she “paved the way for others in her field to bring their talents to television,” according to the Paley Center for Media Study in New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2013 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Fame was never her intent, Dr. Joyce Brothers often said. She was not yet 30, new to stay-at-home motherhood and struggling to help her husband stretch his pay as a medical resident when she came up with an ambitious plan: Transform herself into a boxing expert and try out for "The $64,000 Question," a popular 1950s television quiz show. "Gee, a loser on those shows gets a Cadillac," she once recalled, "and I could be a loser. " Instead, she won big and used her instant celebrity to establish a new media specialty - pop psychology.
BOOKS
June 24, 1990 | Judith Freeman, Freeman is the author of "The Chinchilla Farm," a novel. and
Imagine spending a few hours with one of your closest friends, talking about your life, discussing all the lovers who've disappointed you, revealing your unhappiness with therapists who have failed to explain to you why, in this culture of rapid, inexorable progress, you shouldn't feel a dislocation of spirit and personality. In the course of your confessional session, you disclose the story of your incestual family life.
BOOKS
November 4, 1990
WIDOWED By Dr. Joyce Brothers (Simon & Schuster: $19.95; 256 pp.) . You have to admire Dr. Joyce Brothers for what she's tried to do--take her private pain at the death of her beloved husband Milt and turn it into some public good. She seems to understand that she possesses a unique, ironic power. For a psychologist who has spent her professional life doling out the answers to admit that she has none, that she is as vulnerable as the next person, makes her story all the more poignant.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1989 | From Times wire services
New York's Public Service Commission rerouted a proposed natural gas pipeline around property owned by Dr. Joyce Brothers. The $407-million, 399-mile pipeline, which would bring Canadian gas to New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, was approved Wednesday by the PSC. The project is under review by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The previous pipeline route would have gone straight through land owned by the psychologist and advice columnist in Dover, north of New York City.
NEWS
January 3, 1985 | JENNINGS PARROTT
--The husband of well-known psychologist Dr. Joyce Brothers says his wife's advice to her own family members is so "abysmal" that they do not ask her opinion, a magazine reported. Milton Brothers told Family Weekly that as far as his wife is concerned, "psychology is an expertly trained art or science," but it doesn't work with family members because "she totally loses her objectivity.
SPORTS
July 10, 1998 | SHAV GLICK
It seems like everybody wants to help Mark McGwire as he chases Roger Maris' single-season home run record. Now Dr. Joyce Brothers is in the act. Reacting to McGwire's comment that he felt like a "caged animal" because of all the attention paid him, the noted psychologist gave this recommendation: "When you're alone, Mark, visualize your swing in exactly the right way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2013 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Fame was never her intent, Dr. Joyce Brothers often said. She was not yet 30, new to stay-at-home motherhood and struggling to help her husband stretch his pay as a medical resident when she came up with an ambitious plan: Transform herself into a boxing expert and try out for "The $64,000 Question," a popular 1950s television quiz show. "Gee, a loser on those shows gets a Cadillac," she once recalled, "and I could be a loser. " Instead, she won big and used her instant celebrity to establish a new media specialty - pop psychology.
NEWS
January 18, 1999
In Whatever Works, we feature an interesting person discussing some aspect of his or her career or special project. Today's guest is Dr. Joyce Brothers, 70, who lives in New York. * Most big businesses have 10-year plans. They look ahead, form "think tank" committees and draw up projections of where the company should be in 10 years. When I was beginning my career, I felt that women, including me, could profit from the same kind of advance planning.
SPORTS
July 10, 1998 | SHAV GLICK
It seems like everybody wants to help Mark McGwire as he chases Roger Maris' single-season home run record. Now Dr. Joyce Brothers is in the act. Reacting to McGwire's comment that he felt like a "caged animal" because of all the attention paid him, the noted psychologist gave this recommendation: "When you're alone, Mark, visualize your swing in exactly the right way.
BOOKS
November 4, 1990
WIDOWED By Dr. Joyce Brothers (Simon & Schuster: $19.95; 256 pp.) . You have to admire Dr. Joyce Brothers for what she's tried to do--take her private pain at the death of her beloved husband Milt and turn it into some public good. She seems to understand that she possesses a unique, ironic power. For a psychologist who has spent her professional life doling out the answers to admit that she has none, that she is as vulnerable as the next person, makes her story all the more poignant.
BOOKS
June 24, 1990 | Judith Freeman, Freeman is the author of "The Chinchilla Farm," a novel. and
Imagine spending a few hours with one of your closest friends, talking about your life, discussing all the lovers who've disappointed you, revealing your unhappiness with therapists who have failed to explain to you why, in this culture of rapid, inexorable progress, you shouldn't feel a dislocation of spirit and personality. In the course of your confessional session, you disclose the story of your incestual family life.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1989 | From Times wire services
New York's Public Service Commission rerouted a proposed natural gas pipeline around property owned by Dr. Joyce Brothers. The $407-million, 399-mile pipeline, which would bring Canadian gas to New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, was approved Wednesday by the PSC. The project is under review by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The previous pipeline route would have gone straight through land owned by the psychologist and advice columnist in Dover, north of New York City.
NEWS
January 18, 1999
In Whatever Works, we feature an interesting person discussing some aspect of his or her career or special project. Today's guest is Dr. Joyce Brothers, 70, who lives in New York. * Most big businesses have 10-year plans. They look ahead, form "think tank" committees and draw up projections of where the company should be in 10 years. When I was beginning my career, I felt that women, including me, could profit from the same kind of advance planning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2000 | Patricia Ward Biederman
June is sorely lacking in days your employer will give you paid time off to celebrate. But that doesn't mean it's without its notable holidays and anniversaries. We honor the flag on June 14, fathers on June 18. And June 19 is Juneteenth, which marks the day in 1865 when African Americans in Texas learned of the Emancipation Proclamation--more than two years after Lincoln signed the document ending slavery in the United States.
NEWS
January 3, 1985 | JENNINGS PARROTT
--The husband of well-known psychologist Dr. Joyce Brothers says his wife's advice to her own family members is so "abysmal" that they do not ask her opinion, a magazine reported. Milton Brothers told Family Weekly that as far as his wife is concerned, "psychology is an expertly trained art or science," but it doesn't work with family members because "she totally loses her objectivity.
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