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Joyce Carol Oates

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October 23, 2010
Sourland Stories Joyce Carol Oates Ecco: 374 pp., $25.99
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2013 | By Philip Brandes
We all have a yearning for a coherent narrative in life, maintains Joyce Carol Oates, but that illusory comfort is off the table in her one-act play, “Tone Clusters,” at Will Geer's Theatricum Botanicum. For anyone familiar with Oates' fiction, it will come as no surprise that the piece is dark, elliptical and uncompromising in its intellectual rigor. Written in 1990, it also proved eerily prescient in depicting the media's ever-increasing voracious and invasive exploitation of tragedy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A couple of winters ago,  Joyce Carol Oates  pulled out a manuscript she first put down in 1984, had dusted up every six or seven years and couldn't quite finish. "Writing is very intuitive and you can't quite force it," she said. Not that she hasn't been publishing in the meantime, but about three decades later we finally have " The Accursed ," Oates' new book that delves into the supernatural and that some critics say shows the master novelist's breadth in form and structure.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
Who thinks Japanese writer Haruki Murakami will win the Nobel Prize in literature? British bettors do. British betting house Ladbrokes has Murakami as this year's favorite for the Nobel Prize in literature. The author of such books as "1Q84," "Norwegian Wood," "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle" and next year's "Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage" is frequently thought of as a top contender . In 2012, the Guardian called him the frontrunner , but he lost out to Chinese author Mo Yan, who was a new name in Ladbrokes' list that year.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2013 | By Philip Brandes
We all have a yearning for a coherent narrative in life, maintains Joyce Carol Oates, but that illusory comfort is off the table in her one-act play, “Tone Clusters,” at Will Geer's Theatricum Botanicum. For anyone familiar with Oates' fiction, it will come as no surprise that the piece is dark, elliptical and uncompromising in its intellectual rigor. Written in 1990, it also proved eerily prescient in depicting the media's ever-increasing voracious and invasive exploitation of tragedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013 | By Wendy Smith
"The Accursed," an astonishing fever dream of a novel, sets loose specters from the beyond to prey on innocent and guilty alike. But are there any real innocents in the diseased society Oates so scathingly depicts? Making skillful use of gothic fiction's time-honored conventions - demon lovers, haunted houses, guilty secrets, murderous transformations, supernatural visitations - the author repeatedly connects these unearthly manifestations to moral rot in the real world, in this case the "claustrophobic little world of privilege and anxiety" that is Princeton, N.J., in 1905 and '06. The president of Princeton University is Woodrow Wilson, embroiled in a power struggle with a popular dean over his desire to curb the eating clubs that dominate the school's social life.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2004 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
Joyce CAROL OATES, it would seem, has never suffered from writer's block. She has written more than 80 books, including novels, essays, plays, and poetry and short story collections. More than once she has published three books in the same year. What's even more remarkable, though, is that the work has been consistently good. That is, if you appreciate the author's twisted sensibility, her penchant for delving into the more sinister, grotesque side of life.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | JUDITH FREEMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joyce Carol Oates is an anomaly in the world of literature, someone who deviates in excess of normal expectation. She's so prolific that hardly has one of her books been reviewed, read and talked about before another appears. Lately, her considerable power has taken a dark turn. In last year's novel "Because It Is Bitter, and Because It Is My heart," a finalist for the National Book Award, no subject, no voice, class, race, and--quite important--no level of violence seemed beyond her powers.
BOOKS
December 29, 1996 | BEVERLY LOWRY
Families do come apart. Good, solid families, and for all kinds of reasons. Death, drink, betrayal, a sudden reversal of financial status, a whisper of scandal. Some unthinkable thing happens, after which--or so the story goes--nothing is ever the same again. Houses go dark, weeds run rampant, the daytime drinking begins. There, family members tell themselves and others, pointing at calendars, scrapbooks or a photograph, it happened right there.
NEWS
November 7, 1986 | PENELOPE MOFFET
She's pale and painfully thin, with enormous dark eyes set in a serious face. Earlier in her career she was known to decline giving interviews and public talks, and even today writer Joyce Carol Oates looks like a woman who would rather go to the dentist than stand in front of a large audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Over at the New Yorker's Page Turner blog, essayist and novelist Thomas Beller has a fascinating post  about how writers interact with Twitter. “Almost everybody who is a writer these days,” he observes, “gets, at some point, a lecture on the necessity of being 'on' Twitter and Facebook. It's a tool of selling and career building. It is, for writers of all ages and stages, not so much required reading as required writing. The whole thing seems stupid at first: you ignore whoever is giving you this lecture, until one day you decide, O.K., let's try it out, and then discover that it's kind of fun. And, as long as it's done in moderation, it is kind of interesting.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Cedering Fox knows good actors, and isn't afraid to ask a favor. Her query is simple, and the actors almost always say yes. It's not like she wants them to be part of a hot new cable drama or a comedy Web series gone viral. Instead, she's asking them to perform the decidedly pre-21st century task of reading stories out loud, from actual books. The vivacious founder of WordTheatre, which features popular actors reading great works of contemporary short fiction, has a Rolodex worthy of a Hollywood agent and a book collection that would quicken the pulse of any bibliophile.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A couple of winters ago,  Joyce Carol Oates  pulled out a manuscript she first put down in 1984, had dusted up every six or seven years and couldn't quite finish. "Writing is very intuitive and you can't quite force it," she said. Not that she hasn't been publishing in the meantime, but about three decades later we finally have " The Accursed ," Oates' new book that delves into the supernatural and that some critics say shows the master novelist's breadth in form and structure.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Since background-check legislation was voted down in the Senate on Thursday, Adam Winkler, author of "Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms in America," expects a "lively" conversation at his panel on guns in America at the 18th annual Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. "This is a hot-button issue, and we have a collection of some of the leading scholars on guns and gun politics on this panel," he says. "Sometimes things can get heated. But I find that people are really hungering for a balanced, non-emotional discussion.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013 | By Wendy Smith
"The Accursed," an astonishing fever dream of a novel, sets loose specters from the beyond to prey on innocent and guilty alike. But are there any real innocents in the diseased society Oates so scathingly depicts? Making skillful use of gothic fiction's time-honored conventions - demon lovers, haunted houses, guilty secrets, murderous transformations, supernatural visitations - the author repeatedly connects these unearthly manifestations to moral rot in the real world, in this case the "claustrophobic little world of privilege and anxiety" that is Princeton, N.J., in 1905 and '06. The president of Princeton University is Woodrow Wilson, embroiled in a power struggle with a popular dean over his desire to curb the eating clubs that dominate the school's social life.
IMAGE
July 29, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Since her death on Aug. 5, 1962, hundreds of books about Marilyn Monroe have been published by various writers, ranging from famous names such as Norman Mailer, Gloria Steinem and Joyce Carol Oates, to people who worked with her on movie sets. With so many choices, its hard to navigate through the Monroe oeuvre, but here are 10 volumes that should nourish the soul of her most ardent fans. "Marilyn: A Biography" (1973). Norman Mailer's controversial, lavish, coffee-table exploration of Monroe includes stunning images by several noted photographers as well as the author's rather grandiose prose.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2011 | By Gina McIntyre, Los Angeles Times
Dread, in fiction, can be a magnificent thing. Joyce Carol Oates, in her latest collection of short stories, "Give Me Your Heart," spends a great deal of time conjuring dread, that conviction that calamity lies just beyond the end of the sentence, possibly the next paragraph. It's the compulsion to know the impending catastrophe that propels the reader forward through these 10 tales ? a voyeuristic desire to watch the deeply flawed (or at least unreliable) narrators in these stories march toward a certain, sorry fate.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
A Widow's Story A Memoir Joyce Carol Oates Ecco: 418 pp., $27.99 When, at 6:15 a.m. on Feb. 11, 2008, Joyce Carol Oates saw her 77-year-old husband, Raymond Smith, eating breakfast, she did not ? could not ? know that he would be dead within a week. Still, she acknowledges in "A Widow's Story," her memoir of his death and its aftermath, she had the feeling that all was not right. "There is an hour, a minute ? you will remember it forever ? when you know instinctively on the basis of the most inconsequential evidence, that something is wrong," she observes.
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