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Joyce Hoffman

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July 27, 1990 | DAVID REYES
JOYCE HOFFMAN EX-WORLD CHAMPION, 43 Mention the name Joyce Hoffman to today's surf grommets, and they'll shake their heads and ask, "Who is she?" She is considered the best female surfer ever. In the 1960s, Hoffman's deftness on a surfboard was magical. She was aggressive, yet graceful. Very few women at the time, or since then, have been able to match her style or string of victories.
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NEWS
July 27, 1990 | DAVID REYES
JOYCE HOFFMAN EX-WORLD CHAMPION, 43 Mention the name Joyce Hoffman to today's surf grommets, and they'll shake their heads and ask, "Who is she?" She is considered the best female surfer ever. In the 1960s, Hoffman's deftness on a surfboard was magical. She was aggressive, yet graceful. Very few women at the time, or since then, have been able to match her style or string of victories.
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SPORTS
August 28, 1989
Israel Paskowitz of Capistrano Beach finished first in the young men's division in the Oceanside Longboarding Surfing Club contest Sunday. Paskowitz, who also won the young men's (19-29) division last year, finished second in the noserider competition. Bill Stewart of San Clemente won the men's (30-39) division and Joyce Hoffman of San Juan Capistrano won the women's open division.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1999 | Marissa Espino, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 15
Five notable surfers will be inducted into Huntington Surf and Sport's Surfer's Hall of Fame this week and next. Surfing legend Jack Haley, owner of Captain Jack's restaurant in Sunset Beach, will be officially inducted Thursday along with Joyce Hoffman, a world champion surfer from the 1960s. "For me to be honored on Thursday is just 40 years of watching [surfing] grow, and I'm just pleased and happy to be a part of it," Haley said. He became the first U.S. surfing champion in 1959.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1988 | LAURA KURTZMAN
At one time or another in the 1950s and '60s, nearly every great California surfer rode the waves at San Onofre. Phil Edwards, considered the best surfer in the world during the 1950s and early '60s, spent his teen-age summers inventing surfing maneuvers at San Onofre, along with Mickey Dora. Dora later became famous for his fancy surfing at Malibu.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1994 | ROBERT BARKER
Visitors from 38 nations and 50 states have raved about the Huntington Beach International Surfing Museum. Surfing fans fill a visitors' registration book on the museum director's desk with laudatory comments like "rad," "stoked," "cosmic" and "this place rules." One visitor wrote, "The most fun I've ever had in a museum." The museum, at 411 Olive Ave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1994
They skipped the Pellegrino and Perrier, omitted the air-kisses and dazzling smiles, and were the better for it. After all, it was Huntington Beach, not Hollywood, and this was the inauguration of the Surfing Walk of Fame, not a mere addition of yet another star to that other walk, the one on Hollywood Boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1994 | DEBRA CANO
They called him the Phantom Surfer, the Mad Scientist or simply the Legend. Bob Simmons was a surfboard shaper extraordinaire. He used balsa wood, foam and fiberglass to make lighter boards, helping bring the demise of the heavy planks of the 1930s and '40s, said Ann Beasley, director of the International Surfing Museum. Nine boards designed by Simmons, who died surfing in 1954, are on exhibit at the Huntington Beach museum.
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