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Joyce Jenkins

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NEWS
February 1, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Sierra Nevada foothills northeast of Fresno, residents of Coulterville talk of a young man who braved a wildfire in 1989 to help firefighters find and rescue people living off the main roads. Tommy, they said, was able to help direct the search-and-rescue teams because he had learned to hunt and fish in the steep canyons surrounding the tightly knit former gold-mining town of 393 people.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1994 | CONSTANCE SOMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal to open a homeless shelter in downtown Ventura pitted the mentally ill homeless and their advocates against residents Monday, with both sides arguing the issue late into the night before the Ventura City Council. The Turning Point Foundation, which operates a drop-in center for the mentally ill on Thompson Boulevard near California Street, has proposed putting 10 roll-away beds in the center to allow clients to spend the night there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2007 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Acclaimed tenor Jerry Hadley, once considered one of America's most versatile and important opera singers, died Wednesday at St. Francis Hospital and Health Centers in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., said family spokeswoman Celia P. Novo. He was 55. Hadley was found unconscious on the floor of his bedroom in his upstate New York home on July 10 with what police said was a self-inflicted wound to his head from an air rifle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2002 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a rankling challenge to state pride. Surely California has no less literary talent or affection for the written word than Arkansas, Wyoming or the other 19 states that have official bards. Yet with the deadline looming Tuesday, just 10 nominations have come in for the now formal post of California poet laureate, about one-third the number expected. Program organizers blame the muted response mostly on a time crunch in publicizing the job, which came into being on Jan. 1.
NEWS
May 18, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You can find them any night of the week, these heirs to the Beat Generation, crowded into coffee shops and bars, listening in rapt silence to their fellow poets. At dusk, the new writers of the cafe stage leave their day jobs behind, hit the coffeehouses and take turns performing their work. Devoted to the art of the spoken word, they are part of a flourishing subculture that embraces the city's romantic image and furthers its literary tradition.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2007 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
THE poet and novelist Michael Ondaatje -- born in Sri Lanka, reared in England, based in Toronto -- seems as unstuck in time, as well as space, as any contemporary writer. His books are filled with period detail and are set all over the place, and sometimes only obliquely overlap with his biography.
NEWS
July 7, 1994 | STEPHEN M.H. BRAITMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As civilization advances, poetry almost necessarily declines. --Thomas Babington Macaulay Following old Macaulay's dictum, today's poetry is either in steep decline as we boldly move onto the superhighway of One Wired World or poetry is fine and it's society that has sunk. Either way, there is a publication dedicated to tuning in the universe of poetry as it rises--or falls--against the larger canvas of the modern world.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | PATT MORRISON and DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When a war lasts only six weeks--about as long as Lent or the NBA playoffs--everything necessarily happens at double-time. Conquest, death, even fame. From whatever imminent moment the diplomats and tacticians fix as "V-K Day," the official end of the war, the memory machine begins to replay itself. This truncated war has elevated unremarkable people and places to sudden and sometimes unwelcome celebrity, klieg lights burning them into the public mind.
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