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Joyce Luther Kennard

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NEWS
December 20, 1988 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian on Monday announced the names of four state appellate court justices, including two women, whom he is considering to fill an upcoming vacancy on the California Supreme Court. Deukmejian submitted the names for evaluation by a special commission of the State Bar. After the nonbinding review, one of the candidates would be in line for selection by the governor to replace Justice John A. Arguelles, who is retiring March 1.
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MAGAZINE
February 7, 1993 | MICHELE KORT, Michele Kort is the associate editor of UCLA Magazine. Her last story for this magazine was a profile of Shelley Duvall.
A few years ago, Jerry Brown, seated on an L. A.-San Francisco commuter flight, happened to glance at the reading material of the passenger in the row ahead of him. "You work for the state Supreme Court, don't you?" he asked, spotting the unique format of the court's memos. The passenger, a petite, striking woman with an indefinable olio of Eurasian features, wasn't familiar to him. "Are you a clerk? No? Then what are you?" "Well," Joyce Kennard said, "I'm a justice."
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NEWS
April 6, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
Joyce Luther Kennard, an immigrant who overcame personal adversity to attain swift success in the law, was sworn in Wednesday as a member of the California Supreme Court, becoming the first person of Asian heritage and only the second woman to join the high court. The 47-year-old Kennard, who was on the state Court of Appeal in Los Angeles, took the oath of office from Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas shortly after her unanimous confirmation by the state Judicial Appointments Commission.
NEWS
December 14, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
State Supreme Court Justice Joyce L. Kennard is joining scores of court staff members in taking a voluntary, four-day unpaid furlough to try to avoid mandatory staff pay cuts in the wake of the state budget crisis. "You cannot ask your staff to be subject to financial sacrifice when you yourself are not subject to it," Kennard said Friday. "I view loyalty as a two-way street." She added that if pay cuts also are imposed on court staff members, she will accept such a cut for herself as well.
NEWS
March 15, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The state Judicial Appointments Commission will hold a confirmation hearing April 5 in Los Angeles on the nomination of Appellate Justice Joyce L. Kennard to the California Supreme Court, it was announced Tuesday. The commission's quick action opened the way for Kennard to take office less than four weeks after she was named by Gov. George Deukmejian to succeed Justice John A. Arguelles, who retired March 1.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
Justice Joyce L. Kennard, strengthening the belief that she may provide pivotal votes on the state Supreme Court, says she has established a "streak of independence" since joining the court last April. "I can assure you I am not a token presence," Kennard, the court's only female member, said in an appearance Friday night before the California Women Lawyers, most of whom were here for the annual meeting of the State Bar of California.
NEWS
July 15, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Prayer can be barred at public high school graduations. The state civil rights agency should be allowed to award emotional-distress damages to victims of job bias. A condemned killer's life should be spared because his statements to a psychotherapist were revealed to a jury. Those are hardly the views one might expect of a former state prosecutor appointed to the California Supreme Court by a conservative Republican governor who campaigned hard against liberal judges.
NEWS
March 20, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian's previous five appointees to the state Supreme Court had one thing in common: All were experienced judges with well-established records that invited predictions of the moderately conservative course they since have followed on the high court. But there are no bold, sweeping prophecies being made about the governor's newest nominee, Appellate Justice Joyce L. Kennard of Los Angeles.
NEWS
March 12, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
In a surprise move, Gov. George Deukmejian on Saturday nominated Appellate Justice Joyce L. Kennard, an Asian-born immigrant who spent part of her childhood in a World War II internment camp, to the California Supreme Court. If confirmed, Kennard, a 47-year-old former state prosecutor and now on the state Court of Appeal in Los Angeles, will succeed Justice John A. Arguelles, who retired March 1.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buried in an avalanche of candidates and controversies is one of the best-kept secrets of the fall campaign: Five justices are on Tuesday's ballot seeking retention or confirmation to the state Supreme Court. The little-noticed list names Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas and Justices Edward A. Panelli, Joyce L. Kennard and Armand Arabian--as well as Appellate Justice Marvin R. Baxter of Fresno who, if approved, will succeed retiring Justice David N. Eagleson in January.
NEWS
July 15, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Prayer can be barred at public high school graduations. The state civil rights agency should be allowed to award emotional-distress damages to victims of job bias. A condemned killer's life should be spared because his statements to a psychotherapist were revealed to a jury. Those are hardly the views one might expect of a former state prosecutor appointed to the California Supreme Court by a conservative Republican governor who campaigned hard against liberal judges.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buried in an avalanche of candidates and controversies is one of the best-kept secrets of the fall campaign: Five justices are on Tuesday's ballot seeking retention or confirmation to the state Supreme Court. The little-noticed list names Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas and Justices Edward A. Panelli, Joyce L. Kennard and Armand Arabian--as well as Appellate Justice Marvin R. Baxter of Fresno who, if approved, will succeed retiring Justice David N. Eagleson in January.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
Justice Joyce L. Kennard, strengthening the belief that she may provide pivotal votes on the state Supreme Court, says she has established a "streak of independence" since joining the court last April. "I can assure you I am not a token presence," Kennard, the court's only female member, said in an appearance Friday night before the California Women Lawyers, most of whom were here for the annual meeting of the State Bar of California.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
Joyce Luther Kennard, an immigrant who overcame personal adversity to attain swift success in the law, was sworn in Wednesday as a member of the California Supreme Court, becoming the first person of Asian heritage and only the second woman to join the high court. The 47-year-old Kennard, who was on the state Court of Appeal in Los Angeles, took the oath of office from Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas shortly after her unanimous confirmation by the state Judicial Appointments Commission.
NEWS
March 20, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian's previous five appointees to the state Supreme Court had one thing in common: All were experienced judges with well-established records that invited predictions of the moderately conservative course they since have followed on the high court. But there are no bold, sweeping prophecies being made about the governor's newest nominee, Appellate Justice Joyce L. Kennard of Los Angeles.
NEWS
March 15, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The state Judicial Appointments Commission will hold a confirmation hearing April 5 in Los Angeles on the nomination of Appellate Justice Joyce L. Kennard to the California Supreme Court, it was announced Tuesday. The commission's quick action opened the way for Kennard to take office less than four weeks after she was named by Gov. George Deukmejian to succeed Justice John A. Arguelles, who retired March 1.
NEWS
December 14, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
State Supreme Court Justice Joyce L. Kennard is joining scores of court staff members in taking a voluntary, four-day unpaid furlough to try to avoid mandatory staff pay cuts in the wake of the state budget crisis. "You cannot ask your staff to be subject to financial sacrifice when you yourself are not subject to it," Kennard said Friday. "I view loyalty as a two-way street." She added that if pay cuts also are imposed on court staff members, she will accept such a cut for herself as well.
MAGAZINE
February 7, 1993 | MICHELE KORT, Michele Kort is the associate editor of UCLA Magazine. Her last story for this magazine was a profile of Shelley Duvall.
A few years ago, Jerry Brown, seated on an L. A.-San Francisco commuter flight, happened to glance at the reading material of the passenger in the row ahead of him. "You work for the state Supreme Court, don't you?" he asked, spotting the unique format of the court's memos. The passenger, a petite, striking woman with an indefinable olio of Eurasian features, wasn't familiar to him. "Are you a clerk? No? Then what are you?" "Well," Joyce Kennard said, "I'm a justice."
NEWS
March 12, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
In a surprise move, Gov. George Deukmejian on Saturday nominated Appellate Justice Joyce L. Kennard, an Asian-born immigrant who spent part of her childhood in a World War II internment camp, to the California Supreme Court. If confirmed, Kennard, a 47-year-old former state prosecutor and now on the state Court of Appeal in Los Angeles, will succeed Justice John A. Arguelles, who retired March 1.
NEWS
December 20, 1988 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian on Monday announced the names of four state appellate court justices, including two women, whom he is considering to fill an upcoming vacancy on the California Supreme Court. Deukmejian submitted the names for evaluation by a special commission of the State Bar. After the nonbinding review, one of the candidates would be in line for selection by the governor to replace Justice John A. Arguelles, who is retiring March 1.
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