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NEWS
September 27, 1998 | IRENE LACHNER
We wanted to see what a scarlet woman looked like. And, yes, we are referring to that fashion statement that never seems to go out of style. So you thought that if a chick was wearing a scarlet letter on her chest these days, the big red S stood for Supergirl? Feminism, shmeminism. S has always stood for Siren. S is for Sexuality, that irresistible force of nature that has brought down the reputation of many a helpless great man. Never mind that the guy has decades of experience on her.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Joyce Maynard was intrigued when filmmaker Shane Salerno first came calling with his interest in interviewing her for his documentary on J.D. Salinger. Naturally, Maynard was cautious considering she is a well-regarded author of eight novels and a series of memoirs yet is still probably best known for her relationship with Salinger, which she documented in her 1998 memoir, "At Home in the World. " Yet Salerno, who began courting Maynard seven or eight years ago, kept at it until Maynard agreed to be interviewed in her home in California in 2007.
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BOOKS
November 29, 2001 | Louise Roug and Gina Piccalo, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
Few value their privacy as dearly as J.D. Salinger. Now his daughter, Margaret, is putting her own price on that commodity, joining his former lover, Joyce Maynard, by offering letters from him to the highest bidder. Margaret Salinger, nicknamed Peggy, plans to auction a cache of 32 letters at a Sotheby's auction in New York next month. The correspondence, which began when Peggy was 2 and ended when she was 36, document a relationship marked by turmoil. The letters are "truly extraordinary," said Marsha Malinowski of Sotheby's in New York, adding that in the latter part of the correspondence, Salinger "becomes his character.
BOOKS
August 7, 2009 | Donna Rifkind, Special to the Times
Holidays in American fiction are often the tearful crossroads where domestic expectations clash with domestic reality. Joyce Maynard's sixth novel, " Labor Day," fits right in with this subgenre of broken dreams, chronicling a tense end-of-summer weekend in 1987 in a New Hampshire town. The book's narrator is Henry, a man in his early 30s who is looking back on his fateful 13th year, when he lived with his mother after his parents' divorce. Labor Day weekend for adolescent Henry is a muggy, breathless pause between the tedium of vacation and the misery of middle school.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2003 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
Aside from her 1992 novel "To Die For," adapted into a film starring Nicole Kidman, Joyce Maynard is perhaps best known for her memoir "At Home in the World," which detailed her former relationship with J.D. Salinger -- begun in 1972 when she was a freshman at Yale. Although the famously reclusive author was not the only subject of her book, that aspect of it stirred up a good deal of attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Joyce Maynard was intrigued when filmmaker Shane Salerno first came calling with his interest in interviewing her for his documentary on J.D. Salinger. Naturally, Maynard was cautious considering she is a well-regarded author of eight novels and a series of memoirs yet is still probably best known for her relationship with Salinger, which she documented in her 1998 memoir, "At Home in the World. " Yet Salerno, who began courting Maynard seven or eight years ago, kept at it until Maynard agreed to be interviewed in her home in California in 2007.
BOOKS
August 7, 2009 | Donna Rifkind, Special to the Times
Holidays in American fiction are often the tearful crossroads where domestic expectations clash with domestic reality. Joyce Maynard's sixth novel, " Labor Day," fits right in with this subgenre of broken dreams, chronicling a tense end-of-summer weekend in 1987 in a New Hampshire town. The book's narrator is Henry, a man in his early 30s who is looking back on his fateful 13th year, when he lived with his mother after his parents' divorce. Labor Day weekend for adolescent Henry is a muggy, breathless pause between the tedium of vacation and the misery of middle school.
NEWS
September 27, 1998 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it the summer the girls narked. With documents alarming in length, detail and lack of insight, Monica Lewinsky and Joyce Maynard treated Americans to guided tours through the dank and dim back closets and subbasements of two American institutions--the presidency and J.D. Salinger. Certainly in form, and to some extent content, the stories are dissimilar.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2009 | Donna Rifkind, Rifkind is a critic whose work has appeared in several publications, including the Washington Post and the New York Times.
Holidays in American fiction are often the tearful crossroads where domestic expectations clash with domestic reality. Joyce Maynard's sixth novel, "Labor Day," fits right in with this subgenre of broken dreams, chronicling a tense end-of-summer weekend in 1987 in a New Hampshire town. The book's narrator is Henry, a man in his early 30s who is looking back on his fateful 13th year, when he lived with his mother after his parents' divorce.
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | Associated Press
A 35-year correspondence between "The Catcher in the Rye" author J.D. Salinger and his daughter Margaret failed to sell at auction Wednesday. Bidding for the 32 letters at the Sotheby's auction house started at $130,000 and was stopped at $170,000 because it did not meet the minimum price the seller was willing to accept, said Lauren Gioia, a Sotheby's spokeswoman. Sotheby's had estimated the letters would sell for between $250,000 and $350,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2009 | Donna Rifkind, Rifkind is a critic whose work has appeared in several publications, including the Washington Post and the New York Times.
Holidays in American fiction are often the tearful crossroads where domestic expectations clash with domestic reality. Joyce Maynard's sixth novel, "Labor Day," fits right in with this subgenre of broken dreams, chronicling a tense end-of-summer weekend in 1987 in a New Hampshire town. The book's narrator is Henry, a man in his early 30s who is looking back on his fateful 13th year, when he lived with his mother after his parents' divorce.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2003 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
Aside from her 1992 novel "To Die For," adapted into a film starring Nicole Kidman, Joyce Maynard is perhaps best known for her memoir "At Home in the World," which detailed her former relationship with J.D. Salinger -- begun in 1972 when she was a freshman at Yale. Although the famously reclusive author was not the only subject of her book, that aspect of it stirred up a good deal of attention.
BOOKS
November 29, 2001 | Louise Roug and Gina Piccalo, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
Few value their privacy as dearly as J.D. Salinger. Now his daughter, Margaret, is putting her own price on that commodity, joining his former lover, Joyce Maynard, by offering letters from him to the highest bidder. Margaret Salinger, nicknamed Peggy, plans to auction a cache of 32 letters at a Sotheby's auction in New York next month. The correspondence, which began when Peggy was 2 and ended when she was 36, document a relationship marked by turmoil. The letters are "truly extraordinary," said Marsha Malinowski of Sotheby's in New York, adding that in the latter part of the correspondence, Salinger "becomes his character.
NEWS
September 27, 1998 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it the summer the girls narked. With documents alarming in length, detail and lack of insight, Monica Lewinsky and Joyce Maynard treated Americans to guided tours through the dank and dim back closets and subbasements of two American institutions--the presidency and J.D. Salinger. Certainly in form, and to some extent content, the stories are dissimilar.
NEWS
September 27, 1998 | IRENE LACHNER
We wanted to see what a scarlet woman looked like. And, yes, we are referring to that fashion statement that never seems to go out of style. So you thought that if a chick was wearing a scarlet letter on her chest these days, the big red S stood for Supergirl? Feminism, shmeminism. S has always stood for Siren. S is for Sexuality, that irresistible force of nature that has brought down the reputation of many a helpless great man. Never mind that the guy has decades of experience on her.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2010
BOOKS An Evening With Ian McEwan This lively evening of arts and letters features a conversation between the bestselling author of "Atonement" and David Kipen, literature director of the National Endowment for the Arts. McEwan's new novel, "Solar," explores a philandering Nobel prize-winning physicist's effort to save the world from environmental disaster. The Aratani/Japan America Theatre, 244 S. San Pedro St., Los Angeles. 8 p.m. $25. (213) 680-3700. www.lfla.org. Joyce Maynard and Dana Goodyear This reading of selected pieces from the literary magazine Canteen has high stakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
J.D. Salinger's "Catcher in the Rye" was one of the most popular books of the 1950s. Adolescent narrator Holden Caufield's reluctance to go along with societal norms helped lay the psychic groundwork of the countercultural movement of the 1960s. But where the Beats rode that wave, with Allen Ginsberg reading poetry at massive student demonstrations, Salinger withdrew. He'd been a New Yorker, but he moved to rural New England, away from the center of publishing. His last published work appeared in 1965.
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