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Joyce Rebhun

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August 22, 1989 | AURORA MACKEY
During the last four years of his daily use of alcohol and cocaine, John G. didn't do a lot of things. He didn't pay attention to his wife, who eventually divorced him. He didn't pay for insurance, which cost him his BMW. He didn't pay his bills, which led to the loss of his beachfront condominium. But when he entered a substance abuse recovery program in 1986, something else he hadn't paid haunted him even more. It was the debt he owed to the Internal Revenue Service.
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NEWS
August 22, 1989 | AURORA MACKEY
During the last four years of his daily use of alcohol and cocaine, John G. didn't do a lot of things. He didn't pay attention to his wife, who eventually divorced him. He didn't pay for insurance, which cost him his BMW. He didn't pay his bills, which led to the loss of his beachfront condominium. But when he entered a substance abuse recovery program in 1986, something else he hadn't paid haunted him even more. It was the debt he owed to the Internal Revenue Service.
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NEWS
April 10, 1988 | KATE CALLEN, United Press International
When the Internal Revenue Service unveiled its TV ad about the taxpayer stalked by his 1040 form, it tacitly admitted what everyone already knew: filing a tax return can be terrifying. With the April 15 deadline closing in fast, tax phobia is rampant. Joyce Rebhun of Los Angeles is familiar with the symptoms, like depression and paranoia. In most cases, she prescribes a healthy dose of information and a shot of confidence. Sometimes, she steps in and intervenes.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few look forward to April 15, but Joyce Rebhun's clients dread it. Rebhun, who calls herself a tax therapist, is a Westside tax attorney, CPA and historian of taxation whose specialty is nonfilers. With extensions or without, the majority of us manage to get our tax returns in, even if it means racing to the post office as midnight approaches. But the tormented, tax-wise, who seek out Rebhun have let the deadline pass once, twice, even 20 or 30 times.
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