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Joyce Schumaker

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1990 | EILEEN SONDAK
Jack Tygett and Joyce Schumaker are a married couple with much in common. They are both trained dancers. They have both directed and choreographed major musicals. They both teach at schools. But for all they have in common, they do have a striking difference. Each is a product of a different era of musical theater. Tygett, 62, was weaned on the Busby Berkely-style of musical extravaganzas. He danced in lavish movie spectacles, including "Oklahoma!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1990 | EILEEN SONDAK
Jack Tygett and Joyce Schumaker are a married couple with much in common. They are both trained dancers. They have both directed and choreographed major musicals. They both teach at schools. But for all they have in common, they do have a striking difference. Each is a product of a different era of musical theater. Tygett, 62, was weaned on the Busby Berkely-style of musical extravaganzas. He danced in lavish movie spectacles, including "Oklahoma!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
Fairy tales are the secular religion of the modern world, complete with their own commandments and proverbs. Sweep those cinders, little girl, and someday a handsome prince might carry you off to the castle, where you will live happily ever after. Did Mama scold you for losing her cow, little boy? Climb that beanstalk, and you, too, might slay the evil giant and again be a hero in your mother's eyes. The appeal of fairy tales is eternal, like the forever-young feeling of "Peter Pan," now in a Starlight Musical Theatre production flying through the Civic Theatre through June 4. The best of modern productions have dual messages for adults and children, as in Stephen Sondheim's revisionist look at the Jack and Cinderella stories in the hit Broadway musical, "Into the Woods."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1988 | NANCY CHURNIN
It is easy to mistake "42nd Street" for the Cinderella story of Peggy Sawyer, the starry-eyed chorine who, in 36 hours, moves from being a homespun hoofer fired from her first Broadway show to being the star of that same production. Not that spunky little Peggy doesn't come off looking like the center both to audiences of "42nd Street" and the unseen ones attending the show within the show.
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