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May 20, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
In a move to bump up physical book sales, Stephen King will not release an e-book version of his new novel , "Joyland," the Wall Street Journal reports. It's something of a radical move for the man who stood onstage with Amazon's Jeff Bezos in 2009 to introduce the Kindle 2. This time King has decided to throw his support behind brick-and-mortar booksellers. "I have no plans for a digital version," King told the Journal. "In the meantime, let people stir their sticks and go to an actual bookstore rather than a digital one. " However, the print book is still available for pre-order from online retailer Amazon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Emily Keeler
Canadian writer Emily Schultz published her first novel, “Joyland,” in 2006 on ECW, a small press based in Toronto. A coming-of-age tale set in a video-game arcade, "Joyland" did not make bestseller lists or sell in large quantities. So Schultz was rather surprised when her publisher reported a surprising recent sales bump. And it was all thanks to Stephen King. King published his own novel called “Joyland” back in June.  And his novel, which takes place in an amusement park, is not available as an e-book, so Amazon customers eager to download King's “Joyland” may have mistakenly assumed Schultz's ebook is what they are after.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | by Carolyn Kellogg
Pirated e-book versions of Stephen King's "Joyland" have surfaced online. That's notable because King, to support the print book being published by small indie Hard Case Crime, decided not to issue an e-book of this particular novel.  It's not notable, however, in that just about every book Stephen King published is available as a pirated e-book. On one pirate site, major bestselling novels by King available for illicit free download include "The Shining," "The Stand," "Pet Sematary," "It," "The Green Mile," and "The Gunslinger" -- and that's all just one bundled package.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | by Carolyn Kellogg
Pirated e-book versions of Stephen King's "Joyland" have surfaced online. That's notable because King, to support the print book being published by small indie Hard Case Crime, decided not to issue an e-book of this particular novel.  It's not notable, however, in that just about every book Stephen King published is available as a pirated e-book. On one pirate site, major bestselling novels by King available for illicit free download include "The Shining," "The Stand," "Pet Sematary," "It," "The Green Mile," and "The Gunslinger" -- and that's all just one bundled package.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By David Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When it comes to Stephen King, I'm partial to the smaller efforts: novellas, short novels, experiments, the quieter, more interior stuff. It's not that I don't like his big books - especially "The Shining," which remains the scariest thing I've ever read, and the 1996 novel "Desperation," an overarching consideration of sin and sacrifice and redemption, set in a Nevada mining town. Still, what makes King resonate for me is the detail work, the way he can get inside the most mundane situation and animate it, revealing in the process something of how we live.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Bestselling horror writer Stephen King appeared on the NPR program "Fresh Air" on Tuesday night to talk about his new book, "Joyland. " While he got to answer some questions about the book, a supernatural riff on classic noir set in a small amusement park, he also got some atypical questions from host Terri Gross. The "Joyland" story, he said, has been in his head for about 20 years. The story began as an image, and then he built it out -- the story is about a college student, after getting dumped by his girlfriend, who moves from the Northeast to North Carolina to work at an amusement park.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Emily Keeler
Canadian writer Emily Schultz published her first novel, “Joyland,” in 2006 on ECW, a small press based in Toronto. A coming-of-age tale set in a video-game arcade, "Joyland" did not make bestseller lists or sell in large quantities. So Schultz was rather surprised when her publisher reported a surprising recent sales bump. And it was all thanks to Stephen King. King published his own novel called “Joyland” back in June.  And his novel, which takes place in an amusement park, is not available as an e-book, so Amazon customers eager to download King's “Joyland” may have mistakenly assumed Schultz's ebook is what they are after.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Of interest to book lovers and riddle solvers: the Midnight Clock. On Tuesday, Kickstarter featured the Midnight Clock as its project of the day . Kickstarter, of course, is the micro-funding site where anyone can contribute to a project in progress. This project is a wall clock designed in Pittsburgh. Constructed of birch or bamboo, it includes a riddle on the front. Solve the riddle, and the clock opens up to reveal a book hidden inside. What book? Well, that's up to the hider.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Bestselling Scottish author Iain Banks, 59, has died of cancer. His death arrived just two months after he announced on his website that he had been diagnosed with the terminal illness. Banks wrote both science fiction and bestselling social novels. He was best known for the novels "The Wasp Factory," "The Crow Road," and his "The Culture" series. "Banks writes with rich, tactile detail and dark suspense," wrote The Times' Richard Eder in 1998. "The exciting thing about reading Iain Banks is that you never know what kind of book it's going to be," his friend writer Ian Rankin said . "It could be weird, it could be other-worldly, it could be literary fiction, a family saga, about a disc jockey - you don't know what you're going to get, so every time a new book comes out there was that excitement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
Australia's Qantas Airlines is promoting the announcement of its extended flight routes by commissioning a series of books that last exactly as long as each flight .  For passengers, that could mean less worrying about when it's safe to use electronic devices such as a Kindle or iPad. As Business Insider reports, the ad agency Droga5 Sydney is collaborating with Hachette to produce the collection of custom books. Called "A Story For Every Journey," each one promises to take only as long as a specific flight to read, so that you'll finish just as the plane touches down.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By David Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When it comes to Stephen King, I'm partial to the smaller efforts: novellas, short novels, experiments, the quieter, more interior stuff. It's not that I don't like his big books - especially "The Shining," which remains the scariest thing I've ever read, and the 1996 novel "Desperation," an overarching consideration of sin and sacrifice and redemption, set in a Nevada mining town. Still, what makes King resonate for me is the detail work, the way he can get inside the most mundane situation and animate it, revealing in the process something of how we live.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Bestselling horror writer Stephen King appeared on the NPR program "Fresh Air" on Tuesday night to talk about his new book, "Joyland. " While he got to answer some questions about the book, a supernatural riff on classic noir set in a small amusement park, he also got some atypical questions from host Terri Gross. The "Joyland" story, he said, has been in his head for about 20 years. The story began as an image, and then he built it out -- the story is about a college student, after getting dumped by his girlfriend, who moves from the Northeast to North Carolina to work at an amusement park.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
In a move to bump up physical book sales, Stephen King will not release an e-book version of his new novel , "Joyland," the Wall Street Journal reports. It's something of a radical move for the man who stood onstage with Amazon's Jeff Bezos in 2009 to introduce the Kindle 2. This time King has decided to throw his support behind brick-and-mortar booksellers. "I have no plans for a digital version," King told the Journal. "In the meantime, let people stir their sticks and go to an actual bookstore rather than a digital one. " However, the print book is still available for pre-order from online retailer Amazon.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2013
City of Bones: Movie Tie-In The Mortal Instruments Cassandra Clare Simon & Schuster, $14.99 ages 14 and up Soon to be a blockbuster movie, this young adult saga revolves around 15-year-old Clary Fray, who witnesses a murder and then is drawn into the secret milieu of the Shadowhunters, a group devoted to expelling demons from our world and back to their own. (July) Roald Dahl in His Own Words BBC Radio Archives Narrated by Roald Dahl AudioGO, $16.95 The author of "Matilda," "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" and ribald tales for adults looks back on his life and career in this collection of BBC interviews from 1972 to 1989.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
If you'd like to see Vice's beautifully-lit photograph of a model portraying Sylvia Plath kneeling before an open oven -- in a dress from Chloe Sevigny -- you're too late. That photo appeared in a fashion spread illustrating the suicides of female authors. The photos, shot by Annabel Mehran, went online Monday; outcry ensued. On Tuesday morning, they'd been removed. Vice has typically prided itself on being a provocative publication. Removing the photo shoot from its website might be seen as a turn for the magazine -- but of course, the photos can still be found in the print edition.
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