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Jozef Oleksy

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NEWS
April 23, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
An investigation into whether former Prime Minister Jozef Oleksy spied for Moscow has been closed because of insufficient evidence, a military prosecutor said. The three-month investigation into the allegations that drove Oleksy from office established "no direct proof" against him, Col. Slawomir Gorzkiewicz, who headed the probe, said. Oleksy, a former provincial Communist Party boss, has acknowledged frequent contacts with Soviet and Russian diplomats but has denied passing secrets to Moscow.
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NEWS
April 23, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
An investigation into whether former Prime Minister Jozef Oleksy spied for Moscow has been closed because of insufficient evidence, a military prosecutor said. The three-month investigation into the allegations that drove Oleksy from office established "no direct proof" against him, Col. Slawomir Gorzkiewicz, who headed the probe, said. Oleksy, a former provincial Communist Party boss, has acknowledged frequent contacts with Soviet and Russian diplomats but has denied passing secrets to Moscow.
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NEWS
January 25, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Polish Prime Minister Jozef Oleksy, accused by his political enemies of spying for Moscow, resigned Wednesday after a military prosecutor concluded that evidence against him warranted a formal espionage investigation. Oleksy, a former Communist official who became prime minister in March, delivered a somber defense of his actions in a televised address Wednesday night.
NEWS
February 3, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dispatches from KGB agents were literally coming out of the woodwork when Krzysztof Kozlowski took over as Poland's first non-Communist intelligence chief six years ago. Soviet spies were so comfortably embedded in the Interior Ministry that special telephone cables were hanging from the molding, installed as a direct link with the Soviet Embassy. "They were sitting in offices, drinking tea and vodka, and talking with everyone," said Kozlowski, now a Polish senator.
NEWS
January 27, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Polish Prime Minister Jozef Oleksy, who resigned this week over allegations that he spied for Moscow, said Friday that his longtime KGB friend in Warsaw had similar relationships with high-level officials from the Solidarity labor movement.
NEWS
February 3, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dispatches from KGB agents were literally coming out of the woodwork when Krzysztof Kozlowski took over as Poland's first non-Communist intelligence chief six years ago. Soviet spies were so comfortably embedded in the Interior Ministry that special telephone cables were hanging from the molding, installed as a direct link with the Soviet Embassy. "They were sitting in offices, drinking tea and vodka, and talking with everyone," said Kozlowski, now a Polish senator.
NEWS
March 5, 1995 | Reuters
The Polish Parliament approved a new left-wing Cabinet led by Prime Minister Jozef Oleksy on Saturday, raising hopes of faster reforms and a relaxation of political tension. Voting 272 to 99 with 13 abstentions, deputies gave their seal of approval to the team that will succeed that of Waldemar Pawlak.
NEWS
November 6, 1995
More than 40 past and present world leaders will attend the funeral of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin today.
NEWS
March 2, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jozef Oleksy, a top official in Poland's last Communist government, moved a step closer Wednesday to becoming the country's next prime minister. But President Lech Walesa continued to make life difficult for the former Communist Party boss and his left-wing coalition. The Sejm, the lower house of Parliament, voted to oust the 16-month-old government of Prime Minister Waldemar Pawlak and turned to Oleksy to form a new one. The vote had been expected after Pawlak agreed on Feb.
NEWS
November 26, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aleksander Kwasniewski, the former Communist who was elected last week as president of Poland, resigned Saturday from the party of ex-Communists he founded nearly six years ago. Kwasniewski said his resignation from the Social Democracy of the Republic of Poland was intended to send a signal to a nation severely divided by his victory over incumbent President Lech Walesa, though critics doubted that it will have any significant healing effect.
NEWS
January 27, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Polish Prime Minister Jozef Oleksy, who resigned this week over allegations that he spied for Moscow, said Friday that his longtime KGB friend in Warsaw had similar relationships with high-level officials from the Solidarity labor movement.
NEWS
January 25, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Polish Prime Minister Jozef Oleksy, accused by his political enemies of spying for Moscow, resigned Wednesday after a military prosecutor concluded that evidence against him warranted a formal espionage investigation. Oleksy, a former Communist official who became prime minister in March, delivered a somber defense of his actions in a televised address Wednesday night.
NEWS
February 2, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Polish President Aleksander Kwasniewski on Thursday named a former Communist as prime minister, turning aside an appeal by opposition parties for an apolitical "government of experts" to shepherd the country through a contentious espionage scandal. "The only task of this government is to reconstruct the credibility of Poland," said Andrzej Potocki, spokesman for the opposition Freedom Union, a party with roots in the Solidarity labor movement. "We are deeply doubtful this can be done now."
NEWS
February 18, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Communist Party official who helped negotiate the transfer of power to the Solidarity trade union has agreed to become Poland's next prime minister. But Jozef Oleksy, a onetime party boss and a minister in the country's last Communist government, may never get the job. Oleksy, 48, faces what many here consider to be an impossible task: making peace between his left-wing coalition government and President Lech Walesa, the only Solidarity-era figure still holding top office in Poland.
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