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Jozsef Antall

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NEWS
October 9, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Jozsef Antall doesn't believe in sugar-coating the truth when describing the woeful state of the nation he governs. In a three-hour interview Monday, Antall ticked off every depressing detail of the Hungarian economy and likened his leadership task to that of Moses. Inflation and unemployment are spiraling upward while 90% of industry is still owned by the state, he pointed out.
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NEWS
December 13, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hungarian Prime Minister Jozsef Antall, who piloted his country through post-Communist upheaval to create the most stable democracy in Eastern Europe, died of cancer Sunday. He was 61. Antall had been battling non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a form of cancer of the lymphatic system, for most of the nearly four years he headed Hungary's first freely elected government.
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NEWS
April 26, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Up to 15,000 protesters called for Prime Minister Jozsef Antall's resignation, charging the government is led by former Communists who are unable to halt the nation's economic slide. Rising unemployment and double-digit inflation have fed anti-government sentiment, but the turnout in Budapest was far below the 100,000 predicted by organizers. "Antall must go!' the crowd chanted outside Parliament.
NEWS
December 6, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Jozsef Antall, who has struggled with cancer for more than three years, has so deteriorated since a bone-marrow transplant two months ago that doctors and fellow politicians fear he may not live out the year.
NEWS
October 17, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Jozsef Antall and President Bush have common ground for commiseration when they meet Thursday in Washington: Both are caught up in a storm of second thoughts among the voters who put their parties in power. Antall's center-right coalition took a drubbing in local elections that will give opposition Free Democrats control of Budapest and bolster the liberals' claims that Hungarians want radical action on the worsening economic crisis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1990 | TIM WATERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tibor Toczauer stood in the warm morning sun at MacArthur Park on Saturday and reflected on the good luck he and his fellow Hungarian-Americans were about to experience. "Up until this last week, I couldn't believe we would be this fortunate," Toczauer said, referring to the impending arrival of Hungary's prime minister, Jozsef Antall.
NEWS
December 6, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Jozsef Antall, who has struggled with cancer for more than three years, has so deteriorated since a bone-marrow transplant two months ago that doctors and fellow politicians fear he may not live out the year.
NEWS
December 13, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hungarian Prime Minister Jozsef Antall, who piloted his country through post-Communist upheaval to create the most stable democracy in Eastern Europe, died of cancer Sunday. He was 61. Antall had been battling non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a form of cancer of the lymphatic system, for most of the nearly four years he headed Hungary's first freely elected government.
NEWS
August 5, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Ferenc Madl, a conservative law professor who once taught at UC Berkeley, was inaugurated as Hungary's second president since the fall of communism. Madl, elected by parliament in June, succeeded Arpad Goncz, who had served the maximum two terms in the largely ceremonial post. Madl was a power broker who helped develop the right-wing coalition that ousted a Socialist-led government in 1998. In his address, he said Hungary needed to take care of the poor and improve educational opportunity.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
More than half of Hungary's predominantly state-owned economy will be in private hands in three to four years, Prime Minister Jozsef Antall said today. The former communist country plans to replace its 45-year-old centrally planned system with a market economy, a move that has attracted much investor interest from the West, notably the United States. As much as 90% of Hungary's production still comes from state-owned enterprises.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Up to 15,000 protesters called for Prime Minister Jozsef Antall's resignation, charging the government is led by former Communists who are unable to halt the nation's economic slide. Rising unemployment and double-digit inflation have fed anti-government sentiment, but the turnout in Budapest was far below the 100,000 predicted by organizers. "Antall must go!' the crowd chanted outside Parliament.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1990 | TIM WATERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tibor Toczauer stood in the warm morning sun at MacArthur Park on Saturday and reflected on the good luck he and his fellow Hungarian-Americans were about to experience. "Up until this last week, I couldn't believe we would be this fortunate," Toczauer said, referring to the impending arrival of Hungary's prime minister, Jozsef Antall.
NEWS
October 17, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Jozsef Antall and President Bush have common ground for commiseration when they meet Thursday in Washington: Both are caught up in a storm of second thoughts among the voters who put their parties in power. Antall's center-right coalition took a drubbing in local elections that will give opposition Free Democrats control of Budapest and bolster the liberals' claims that Hungarians want radical action on the worsening economic crisis.
NEWS
October 9, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Jozsef Antall doesn't believe in sugar-coating the truth when describing the woeful state of the nation he governs. In a three-hour interview Monday, Antall ticked off every depressing detail of the Hungarian economy and likened his leadership task to that of Moses. Inflation and unemployment are spiraling upward while 90% of industry is still owned by the state, he pointed out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1990 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A motorist who apparently wandered onto the Santa Monica Freeway after a traffic accident early Saturday was struck and killed by an unmarked Los Angeles police car whose occupants were heading to Century City to provide security for visiting Hungarian Prime Minister Jozsef Antall. John Bewick, 35, of Los Angeles was killed. Authorities said the accident occurred about 5 a.m. on the westbound side of the freeway near Fairfax Avenue.
NEWS
November 21, 1990
Here are the heads of state or government attending the 34-nation Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe: Austria: Chancellor Franz Vranitzky Belgium: Prime Minister Wilfried Martens Britain: Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Bulgaria: President Zhelyu Zhelev and Prime Minister Andrei Lukanov Canada: Prime Minister Brian Mulroney Cyprus: President George Vassiliou Czechoslovakia: President Vaclav Havel and Prime Minister Marian Calfa Denmark: Prime Minister Poul Schlueter
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