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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
In the end, it came down to a rematch: Arcadia and University high schools, two teams made up of the brightest young science minds in Southern California who one year ago faced off just like this, armed with nothing more than a small pad of paper and a pencil against a 16-minute rat-a-tat-tat of questions like this: "According to VSEPR bonding theory, if two of the bonded atoms in an octahedral molecule are replaced by two electron pairs, the...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
A National Labor Relations Board judge has ordered NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to rescind disciplinary actions against five scientists who shared emails at work about a Supreme Court decision on background security checks for JPL employees. Administrative Law Judge William G. Kocol ordered JPL to purge disciplinary letters related to the case from the employee files of Dennis Byrnes, Scott Maxwell, Larry D'Addario, Robert Nelson and William Bruce Banerdt. The five were accused of violating rules against unsolicited spam and bulk email.
HOME & GARDEN
November 15, 2013 | By Rob Robinson
I was done. At 57, I had three cratered marriages behind me, all with intelligent women and mutually agreed upon endings that separated them from me and me from my money and a couple of nice homes. It was like I was in the major leagues and just couldn't seem to hit the curve. And they kept throwing it. So I got out of the game. No more long-term relationships, no shared keys, no traveling toothbrushes, none of that. And the strategy worked for a while, not spectacularly, but it worked.
OPINION
February 20, 2013 | Patt Morrison
When artist Dan Goods arrived at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, they gave him a six-month shot. In May, he'll have been there 10 years as JPL's "visual strategist. " He glued soda bottles to the roof of his Taurus to create music on an m.p.h. pipe organ. At JPL, his "Out There" sign (recycled computer-box parts) conjures the infinite in a meeting space and plaster hands he installed in the library hold curious objects. He once drilled a hole through a grain of sand to demonstrate the size of our galaxy, and then put that grain of sand in six rooms of sand that represent the universe.
OPINION
September 23, 2004 | By TIM RUTTEN
When Neil Armstrong stepped on the lunar surface and announced, "We came in peace for all mankind," it marked a fundamental break with the long history of human exploration. From the great Age of Discovery forward, men had claimed territories previously unknown for their guilds, companies and nations. The race to the moon was born of the brutal competition between the United States and the Soviet Union for preeminence in every field of endeavor, but the moment of victory transformed America's vision of its heroic triumph.
SCIENCE
August 29, 2013 | By Thomas H. Maugh II and Karen Kaplan
Bruce C. Murray, a planetary astronomer who joined the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in 1960 and went on to lead the lab 16 years later, died early Thursday at his home in Oceanside. The cause of death was complications of Alzheimer's disease, according to his longtime friend Charlene Anderson. He was 81. Murray was a strong proponent of the scientific value of taking pictures of other planets, the better to learn about Earth. That was a minority view at the time he joined the lab, where missions to measure magnetic fields and particle concentrations were more in vogue.
SCIENCE
June 19, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Sit back, relax, and get ready to explore the red planet in incredible clarity. JPL has just released a billion pixel panorama view of the surface of Mars, and it is awesome. Nearly 900 images were stitched together to create the panorama view--all of them taken by a suite of cameras aboard the Mars Curiosity Rover. The images were taken at Rocknest--a windblown, rocky area of Mars where Curioisty did its first digging in the sand just a few months after it landed on the planet.
SCIENCE
August 6, 2012 | By Amina Khan
The mood was exuberant at Jet Propulsion Laboratory Sunday night after scientists and engineers watched their one-ton rover execute a complex series of maneuvers and land as gracefully as an Olympic gymnast. "So that rocked. Seriously! Woo!" said Richard Cook, deputy project manager for the Mars Science Laboratory, as the punched upward with both fists, a sign of victory. Cook reminisced about how far they had come since the 1997 Pathfinder mission, which sent the first rover, Sojourner, to skitter around the Martian surface.
NEWS
April 8, 1993
Greg Richard, an African-American engineer who sued the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for $200 million for alleged discrimination, has lost his last bid to be heard in U.S. District Court. In a March 30 decision, Judge Lourdes G. Baird refused a motion by Richard to reconsider allegations of racial discrimination against the NASA lab. The four counts of racial discrimination were dismissed in February after JPL moved for summary judgment.
SCIENCE
September 25, 2013 | By Amina Khan
NASA engineers have built a device that uses radar to detect heartbeats in the rubble of collapsed buildings, with technology typically used to explore other planets. The FINDER device, developed with the Department of Homeland Security, could help search-and-rescue teams find survivors trapped underneath the wreckage - even when those victims can't call for help.  Identifying people who are still alive in a collapsed building is a major challenge for urban rescue missions, said Jim Lux, task manager at Jet Propulsion Laboratory for FINDER (short for Finding Individuals for Disaster and Emergency Response)
SCIENCE
September 12, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Now that Voyager 1 has safely reached interstellar space, scientists who have spent decades working on the mission at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory can finally breathe a sigh of relief. "We've had 30 years of fear that something could go wrong," said Torrence Johnson, a senior research scientist at JPL who worked on Voyager camera equipment. "There were white-knuckle moments. " Those fears are gone now. The Voyager 1 probe, first conceived in 1972 and launched in 1977, has exited the sun's heliosphere , considered by many to be the informal boundary of the solar system.
SCIENCE
August 29, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
If you are among the millions who gawk at spectacular photographs and other images from space, you may have Bruce C. Murray to thank. The former director of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, who died Thursday , considered photography and imaging in general to be as important as the esoteric measurement of fields, radiation and particles that were the cutting edge of astronomy at the time he took the helm. When Murray's tenure began in 1976, most researchers there considered visual imagery a "stunt" unworthy of time and money.
SCIENCE
August 29, 2013 | By Thomas H. Maugh II and Karen Kaplan
Bruce C. Murray, a planetary astronomer who joined the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in 1960 and went on to lead the lab 16 years later, died early Thursday at his home in Oceanside. The cause of death was complications of Alzheimer's disease, according to his longtime friend Charlene Anderson. He was 81. Murray was a strong proponent of the scientific value of taking pictures of other planets, the better to learn about Earth. That was a minority view at the time he joined the lab, where missions to measure magnetic fields and particle concentrations were more in vogue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2013 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Although most of his fellow space scientists scoffed at the idea, Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientist Bruce C. Murray insisted that a picture of a planet's surface was worth a thousand words - or at least as much as the measurements of magnetic fields and particle concentrations that his colleagues favored in the early days of planetary exploration in the 1960s. "Pictures," said Louis Friedman, a founder and former executive director of the Planetary Society, "were considered a stunt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2013 | Brad Balukjian
NASA's Jet Propulsion Libratory in Pasadena was buzzing Monday over the one-year anniversary of Curiosity's touchdown on Mars to explore the 3-mile-high Mt. Sharp and to look for signs of past life. To celebrate the rover's landmark, JPL held a party, kicked off by a panel discussion in an auditorium full of enthusiastic employees. Emceed by Chief Scientist Dan McCleese, the presentation recapped the harrowing "7 Minutes of Terror," the name given to a video that described the seven minutes from Curiosity's initial penetration of the Martian atmosphere to its landing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Tuesday said it planned to appeal a National Labor Relations Board judge's order to rescind disciplinary actions against five engineers and scientists. "Caltech respectfully disagrees with the decision and intends to appeal," JPL spokeswoman Veronica McGregor said in a brief statement. Administrative Law Judge William G. Kocol had ordered JPL, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology for NASA, to remove disciplinary letters from the employee files of the five.
NEWS
November 15, 1992
Jet Propulsion Laboratory's spokesman's claim that it funded construction of a water treatment plant to clean up Pasadena's contaminated drinking water ("Arroyo Cleanup Gets Boost," Los Angeles Times, Oct. 22) lacks sincerity and is also a slap in the face of 4,100 Altadena families. The fact is that ground water was contaminated by the dumping of dangerous chemicals on JPL property. The lab consented to financing the Arroyo Seco Treatment Plant only after Pasadena rattled its legal saber.
SCIENCE
August 5, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian
Listening to NASA employees talk about spacecraft is a lot like listening to a group of parents discuss their children. “Spitzer turns 10 this year, if anyone wants to cover it,” said Whitney Clavin, press officer for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Engineers grasping grande cups of coffee scurried in and out of buildings on their way to work. A “Rover Crossing” sign, complete with illustration, sits by a small staircase, a reminder that NASA doesn't take itself too seriously.
SCIENCE
July 19, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
So you've waved at Saturn and had your picture taken by Cassini from nearly 900 million miles away. Now what? At the time of the long-distance photo shoot, Earth and Cassini were about 898,500 million miles apart, which means it will take 1 hour, 20 minutes and 24 seconds for the photons that will go into the image to reach Cassini's wide-angle camera. "If we are to capture your photons, we would need you to be waving 80.4 minutes prior to your photons reaching the spacecraft cameras," Scott Edgington, deputy project scientist for the Cassini mission at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, explained in this blog post . “That's how we came up with the Earth-waving window,” which was between 2:27 and 2:42 p.m. Pacific time.
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