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January 18, 2013 | By Jon Healey
Aaron Swartz may be a galvanizing figure for Internet activists, but his exploits didn't exactly make him popular among copyright holders. In fact, the tributes to Swartz, who committed suicide last week while awaiting trial on computer fraud charges, have started drawing blowback from the defenders of strong copyrights, who argue that Swartz's efforts to "liberate" documents locked behind paywalls was nothing more than theft. A good example is an editorial in Friday's Wall Street Journal -- I'd link to it, but it's behind a paywall (insert your own snappy one-liner about irony or having the courage of one's convictions here)
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BUSINESS
February 6, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
As martyrs go, Aaron Swartz was an extraordinary example of the breed. A computer programming genius, he had helped develop the social networking site Reddit and became known as a leading advocate for easy and free information sharing on the Web. When Swartz committed suicide in January, while awaiting trial on federal computer hacking charges that could have landed him in prison for 35 years and cost him fines of $1 million, his death was seen...
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OPINION
January 18, 2013
Aaron Swartz, who committed suicide last week at age 26, leaves behind quite a legacy for someone so young. He was an Internet activist dedicated to promoting the free flow of information online, which made him a hero to many. His most recent milestone was the launch of Demand Progress, a grass-roots lobbying group that helped defeat the Hollywood-backed anti-piracy bills known by the acronyms SOPA and PIPA. His eagerness to "liberate" information that others had locked behind pay walls,however, contributed to his undoing.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2013 | By Matt Pearce, This post has been updated and corrected. See the note below for details.
Two of Congress' top watchdogs have asked the Justice Department to explain its prosecution of Aaron Swartz, a popular hacktivist who committed suicide Jan. 11. Swartz, 26, was facing the possibility of years in prison for downloading millions of academic articles from a pricey scholarly database, JSTOR, via the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's network. JSTOR declined to press charges, but U.S. attorneys went ahead with a prosecution anyway. After the cofounder of the social news site Reddit died, his family and girlfriend said the U.S. attorney's office in Boston had "hounded" Swartz to his death.
NATIONAL
January 13, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Aaron Swartz's legacy was already guaranteed, even at 26: He helped create Reddit and RSS, which distributes content over the Internet. But his suicide by hanging Friday has also stoked a politically malignant aftermath for the prosecutors pursuing 13 felony charges against him in a trial that was set to begin in a month. Some said his death could be a watershed moment in the ongoing intellectual property debate over the things people share and create, and how they share and create them.  Swartz, an open-Internet advocate who had struggled with depression , was facing decades of prison time and charges that included wire fraud for downloading millions of articles from JSTOR, a nonprofit academic database with a paywall.
NEWS
January 16, 2013 | By Jon Healey
As predicted, the suicide of Aaron Swartz , the widely admired hacktivist who helped create RSS and Reddit, has provoked at least one lawmaker to seek changes in the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act , or CFAA -- the law that federal prosecutors were using to try to send Swartz to prison. Enacted in 1986, the act bars "unauthorized access" to government and financial data or to "protected" computers used in or affecting interstate commerce (e.g., Web servers). Its broadest provision outlaws accessing "protected" computers without authorization and with intent to defraud, obtaining anything worth more than $5,000.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2013 | By Matt Pearce, This post has been updated and corrected. See the note below for details.
Two of Congress' top watchdogs have asked the Justice Department to explain its prosecution of Aaron Swartz, a popular hacktivist who committed suicide Jan. 11. Swartz, 26, was facing the possibility of years in prison for downloading millions of academic articles from a pricey scholarly database, JSTOR, via the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's network. JSTOR declined to press charges, but U.S. attorneys went ahead with a prosecution anyway. After the cofounder of the social news site Reddit died, his family and girlfriend said the U.S. attorney's office in Boston had "hounded" Swartz to his death.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
As martyrs go, Aaron Swartz was an extraordinary example of the breed. A computer programming genius, he had helped develop the social networking site Reddit and became known as a leading advocate for easy and free information sharing on the Web. When Swartz committed suicide in January, while awaiting trial on federal computer hacking charges that could have landed him in prison for 35 years and cost him fines of $1 million, his death was seen...
BUSINESS
January 14, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
Federal prosecutors in Boston have dropped charges against Internet activist Aaron Swartz. Swartz, 26, was found dead Friday in his New York apartment. He apparently had hanged himself. Prosecutors filed the notice of dismissal on Monday. Swartz's family blamed his death on "prosecutorial overreach. " The U.S. attorney's office could not be reached for comment. Federal prosecutors alleged Swartz used MIT's computers to illegally access millions of academic articles through the JSTOR database, a subscription service for scholarly articles.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Aaron Swartz saw a closed world and wanted to crack it open. His suicide by hanging in New York last week has reignited the conflict between the values of property possession and digital openness and intensified debate over the government's determination to send him to prison. In Swartz's world, data constituted knowledge, and knowledge demanded to be shared. In service of that goal, he helped start Reddit, a news and entertainment website, and RSS, the information distribution service.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Jon Healey
Aaron Swartz may be a galvanizing figure for Internet activists, but his exploits didn't exactly make him popular among copyright holders. In fact, the tributes to Swartz, who committed suicide last week while awaiting trial on computer fraud charges, have started drawing blowback from the defenders of strong copyrights, who argue that Swartz's efforts to "liberate" documents locked behind paywalls was nothing more than theft. A good example is an editorial in Friday's Wall Street Journal -- I'd link to it, but it's behind a paywall (insert your own snappy one-liner about irony or having the courage of one's convictions here)
OPINION
January 18, 2013
Aaron Swartz, who committed suicide last week at age 26, leaves behind quite a legacy for someone so young. He was an Internet activist dedicated to promoting the free flow of information online, which made him a hero to many. His most recent milestone was the launch of Demand Progress, a grass-roots lobbying group that helped defeat the Hollywood-backed anti-piracy bills known by the acronyms SOPA and PIPA. His eagerness to "liberate" information that others had locked behind pay walls,however, contributed to his undoing.
NEWS
January 16, 2013 | By Jon Healey
As predicted, the suicide of Aaron Swartz , the widely admired hacktivist who helped create RSS and Reddit, has provoked at least one lawmaker to seek changes in the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act , or CFAA -- the law that federal prosecutors were using to try to send Swartz to prison. Enacted in 1986, the act bars "unauthorized access" to government and financial data or to "protected" computers used in or affecting interstate commerce (e.g., Web servers). Its broadest provision outlaws accessing "protected" computers without authorization and with intent to defraud, obtaining anything worth more than $5,000.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
Federal prosecutors in Boston have dropped charges against Internet activist Aaron Swartz. Swartz, 26, was found dead Friday in his New York apartment. He apparently had hanged himself. Prosecutors filed the notice of dismissal on Monday. Swartz's family blamed his death on "prosecutorial overreach. " The U.S. attorney's office could not be reached for comment. Federal prosecutors alleged Swartz used MIT's computers to illegally access millions of academic articles through the JSTOR database, a subscription service for scholarly articles.
NATIONAL
January 13, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Aaron Swartz's legacy was already guaranteed, even at 26: He helped create Reddit and RSS, which distributes content over the Internet. But his suicide by hanging Friday has also stoked a politically malignant aftermath for the prosecutors pursuing 13 felony charges against him in a trial that was set to begin in a month. Some said his death could be a watershed moment in the ongoing intellectual property debate over the things people share and create, and how they share and create them.  Swartz, an open-Internet advocate who had struggled with depression , was facing decades of prison time and charges that included wire fraud for downloading millions of articles from JSTOR, a nonprofit academic database with a paywall.
NATIONAL
January 17, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
When Aaron Swartz was 3, he taught himself to read. When he was 4 or 5, he could read the New York Times, his father says. When Aaron was 14, he invented the software behind RSS, the information distribution service. Five years later, he started a project that would turn into Web news and entertainment behemoth Reddit. And in an interview with the Los Angeles Times from Chicago on Thursday, Bob Swartz said his son "was hounded to his death by a system and a set of attorneys that still don't understand the nature of what they did. And they destroyed my son by their callousness and inflexibility.” Aaron Swartz, 26, committed suicide by hanging in his Brooklyn apartment last week as he faced a federal trial for what he saw as a political act: In 2010, he physically entered the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to set up a computer hack that would download millions of academic articles from JSTOR, a nonprofit database service.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Aaron Swartz, the 26-year-old Internet genius, was eulogized on Tuesday as a person who wanted to make the world better but was hounded into killing himself by harsh government policies. Swartz was “killed by the government,” his father, Robert Swartz, said at the service at Central Avenue Synagogue in Highland Park, Ill., according to the Chicago Sun-Times . “He was killed by the government, and MIT betrayed all of its basic principles,” he said. Facing the possibility of a long prison sentence if convicted of charges that he illegally downloaded millions of academic journal articles, Swartz hanged himself in his New York apartment Friday.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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