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Juan Antonio Bayona

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Maria Belón wasn't proud of her dumb luck. It had been nearly three years since the Indian Ocean tsunami roared into her family's Christmas vacation in Thailand, killing 230,000 people but somehow sparing her, her husband and her three sons. The family had since returned to Madrid, resumed their routines, but she carried on her shoulders the pain and suffering of surviving something that took so many others' lives. Lost in a quiet grief, unable to enjoy simple pleasures, she wasn't eager to share her story.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Unless you're an especially plugged-in moviegoer, chances are you don't know much about "The Impossible," a drama about a real-life Spanish family that was caught in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami while on holiday in Thailand and suffered both tragedy and triumph in the process. Despite the high-profile, heart-tugging subject matter, and stars including Ewan McGregor and Naomi Watts, the movie from Spanish genre auteur Juan Antonio Bayona has barely made a dent in the U.S. Widening from a niche release to nearly 600 theaters this weekend, only about 400,000 moviegoers turned out to see the film --a number that puts it cringingly behind such offerings as "The Guilt Trip" in that film's third week of release.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey
So terrifying is the 2004 tsunami as imagined in "The Impossible," its destructive force engulfing the screen with such violent menace, that the imagery alone elicits a rising dread so intense you may feel yourself gasping for breath. Spanish-born director J.A. Bayona must have been tempted to let the monstrous waves triggered by the Indian Ocean earthquake that devastated South East Asia and left hundreds of thousands dead overwhelm the dramatic story he tells. That never happens in this profoundly moving film inspired by the real-life experience of the Alvarez Belon family on that fateful December day. Naomi Watts and Ewan McGregor star as Maria and Henry, on holiday with their three boys at a Thailand beach resort, and the film introduces gifted young Tom Holland as the couple's oldest son Lucas.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The tsunami sequence in the new film "The Impossible" is so terrifying in its intensity that you might believe you're watching actual documentary footage of the natural disaster that struck Southeast Asia on Dec. 26, 2004, killing hundreds of thousands. The verisimilitude is the result of more than a year's work of exacting planning - and experimentation - by director Juan Antonio Bayona and his visual- and special-effects supervisors, who used a giant water tank in Spain (the largest in Europe)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2008 | Carina Chocano
A shivery, plangent ghost story from Spanish director Juan Antonio Bayona, "The Orphanage" stars Belen Rueda as a woman who returns to the orphanage where she was raised as its new proprietor with her husband and young son Simon (Roger Princep). Laura (Rueda) plans to open a school for disabled children, but when Simon disappears on the day of their welcome reception, all plans are put aside as she begins a frantic search. Expertly adopting the conventions of the genre, "The Orphanage" also transcends it, becoming a beautifully atmospheric and terrifically acted lament about grief and loss.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The tsunami sequence in the new film "The Impossible" is so terrifying in its intensity that you might believe you're watching actual documentary footage of the natural disaster that struck Southeast Asia on Dec. 26, 2004, killing hundreds of thousands. The verisimilitude is the result of more than a year's work of exacting planning - and experimentation - by director Juan Antonio Bayona and his visual- and special-effects supervisors, who used a giant water tank in Spain (the largest in Europe)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
Juan Antonio Bayona and Sergio G. Sanchez had worked together on “The Orphanage,” a twisted coming-of-age tale that put both of them on the international filmmaking stage. Their second collaboration, “The Impossible,” which opens next week, proved to be an even greater challenge: take audiences through one family's harrowing experience in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami while maintaining a huge level of respect for those people who didn't survive. “The story had to be about loss,” said Sanchez during The Envelope Screening Series.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Unless you're an especially plugged-in moviegoer, chances are you don't know much about "The Impossible," a drama about a real-life Spanish family that was caught in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami while on holiday in Thailand and suffered both tragedy and triumph in the process. Despite the high-profile, heart-tugging subject matter, and stars including Ewan McGregor and Naomi Watts, the movie from Spanish genre auteur Juan Antonio Bayona has barely made a dent in the U.S. Widening from a niche release to nearly 600 theaters this weekend, only about 400,000 moviegoers turned out to see the film --a number that puts it cringingly behind such offerings as "The Guilt Trip" in that film's third week of release.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
Scoring a film as emotionally wrought as "The Impossible" is no easy task. Just ask Fernando Velazquez, the composer behind the film who previously worked with director Juan Antonio Bayona on his first feature "The Orphanage. " Not only did the composer have to contend with a real-life tragedy that killed hundreds of thousands of people, but he was given the opportunity to receive input on his music from Maria Belon, the real woman upon whose story the film is based. Belon visited Abbey Road studios when Velazquez and his musicians were recording the most important cues of the film and shared her story with them.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
As in most countries, James Cameron's last two films "Avatar" and "Titanic" top the box-office list of all-time highest grossers in Spain. But that could change if native son Juan Antonio Bayona and his latest film about a family caught in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami "The Impossible" continues its unlikely drive in the European country. Since its Oct. 11 opening, the film has grossed 29 million euros, over $37 million, in only four weeks of release. "Titanic" grossed 41 million euros in the country when it opened some 15 years ago, and only 2009's "Avatar" has beaten it. Currently the film is the highest-grossing film of the year in the country and the highest-grossing Spanish film of all time.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
  In front of Naomi Watts sat a pen and paper. Across the table sat Tom Holland, a pale young British actor in his early teens. Soon enough, they both knew, they would leave the comfort of their rehearsal room in Spain. They would be dressed in ripped clothes and covered in fake blood, pummeled by murky waves and pushed to their physical limits. But first, they had to draw each other. "I can't draw at all," Watts confessed in a recent phone interview. "And it was quite clear that Tom was having problems too. " Holland picked up his pen and sketched a few tentative lines.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Maria Belón wasn't proud of her dumb luck. It had been nearly three years since the Indian Ocean tsunami roared into her family's Christmas vacation in Thailand, killing 230,000 people but somehow sparing her, her husband and her three sons. The family had since returned to Madrid, resumed their routines, but she carried on her shoulders the pain and suffering of surviving something that took so many others' lives. Lost in a quiet grief, unable to enjoy simple pleasures, she wasn't eager to share her story.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey
So terrifying is the 2004 tsunami as imagined in "The Impossible," its destructive force engulfing the screen with such violent menace, that the imagery alone elicits a rising dread so intense you may feel yourself gasping for breath. Spanish-born director J.A. Bayona must have been tempted to let the monstrous waves triggered by the Indian Ocean earthquake that devastated South East Asia and left hundreds of thousands dead overwhelm the dramatic story he tells. That never happens in this profoundly moving film inspired by the real-life experience of the Alvarez Belon family on that fateful December day. Naomi Watts and Ewan McGregor star as Maria and Henry, on holiday with their three boys at a Thailand beach resort, and the film introduces gifted young Tom Holland as the couple's oldest son Lucas.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
Scoring a film as emotionally wrought as "The Impossible" is no easy task. Just ask Fernando Velazquez, the composer behind the film who previously worked with director Juan Antonio Bayona on his first feature "The Orphanage. " Not only did the composer have to contend with a real-life tragedy that killed hundreds of thousands of people, but he was given the opportunity to receive input on his music from Maria Belon, the real woman upon whose story the film is based. Belon visited Abbey Road studios when Velazquez and his musicians were recording the most important cues of the film and shared her story with them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
Juan Antonio Bayona and Sergio G. Sanchez had worked together on “The Orphanage,” a twisted coming-of-age tale that put both of them on the international filmmaking stage. Their second collaboration, “The Impossible,” which opens next week, proved to be an even greater challenge: take audiences through one family's harrowing experience in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami while maintaining a huge level of respect for those people who didn't survive. “The story had to be about loss,” said Sanchez during The Envelope Screening Series.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Like many mothers, Naomi Watts is often unsure about her child-rearing decisions. With two young boys, the British actress constantly fears for their safety. Falling down stairs, choking or becoming separated on a New York City subway are just a few dangers she's currently fretting about. And don't expect her to rise to the occasion should an emergency occur. She's the first to admit she has trouble dialing a phone when a crisis arises. So it was with great uncertainty that she took on the role of Maria, the brave, and very lucky, mother in "The Impossible," the upcoming film from Spanish director Juan Antonio Bayona that chronicles one family's horrific experience during the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Actors often talk about the scene : The big moment in a script when their character is supposed to do something brave, or when they must dig deep to tap something inside themselves - when an emotion is unveiled that proves so true it is somehow scary. For Ewan McGregor, that moment couldn't have been more heightened during the making of "The Impossible," Juan Antonio Bayona's harrowing drama about a family's experience during the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. It was a moment in a bus station when his character, a man whose wife and oldest son have been swept away in the charging wall of water, finally breaks down while contemplating the sheer magnitude of his loss.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Like many mothers, Naomi Watts is often unsure about her child-rearing decisions. With two young boys, the British actress constantly fears for their safety. Falling down stairs, choking or becoming separated on a New York City subway are just a few dangers she's currently fretting about. And don't expect her to rise to the occasion should an emergency occur. She's the first to admit she has trouble dialing a phone when a crisis arises. So it was with great uncertainty that she took on the role of Maria, the brave, and very lucky, mother in "The Impossible," the upcoming film from Spanish director Juan Antonio Bayona that chronicles one family's horrific experience during the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Actors often talk about the scene : The big moment in a script when their character is supposed to do something brave, or when they must dig deep to tap something inside themselves - when an emotion is unveiled that proves so true it is somehow scary. For Ewan McGregor, that moment couldn't have been more heightened during the making of "The Impossible," Juan Antonio Bayona's harrowing drama about a family's experience during the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. It was a moment in a bus station when his character, a man whose wife and oldest son have been swept away in the charging wall of water, finally breaks down while contemplating the sheer magnitude of his loss.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
As in most countries, James Cameron's last two films "Avatar" and "Titanic" top the box-office list of all-time highest grossers in Spain. But that could change if native son Juan Antonio Bayona and his latest film about a family caught in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami "The Impossible" continues its unlikely drive in the European country. Since its Oct. 11 opening, the film has grossed 29 million euros, over $37 million, in only four weeks of release. "Titanic" grossed 41 million euros in the country when it opened some 15 years ago, and only 2009's "Avatar" has beaten it. Currently the film is the highest-grossing film of the year in the country and the highest-grossing Spanish film of all time.
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