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December 5, 1993 | Jonathan Kandell, Jonathan Kandell is a former European correspondent for the New York Times. His last article for this magazine was about Ecuador's Otavaleno Indians
SANTONA, A SLEEPY PORT ON THE CANTABRIAN COAST, IS the kind of place that Spain's bullfighting establishment embraces a few times a year to prove that despite big-city crowds and their million-dollar revenues, the national blood spectacle is still firmly rooted in the provinces. The town's belfries are bearded with storks' nests. The smell of fish drifts from the nets draped over the wharves.
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MAGAZINE
January 9, 1994
It is refreshing to read an accurate portrayal of the world of bullfighting, warts and all, written by someone well equipped to discuss the subject ("The Reckless Valor of Juan Antonio Ruiz," by Jonathan Kandell, Dec. 5). Kandell's description of Ruiz's disastrous week is quite a departure from the usual depiction of endless parties, luxury and glory--the romantic life of a matador. And the portrait of the sensitive Ruiz is not that of the matador as a sadistic monster, as painted by some opponents of bullfighting.
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MAGAZINE
January 9, 1994
It is refreshing to read an accurate portrayal of the world of bullfighting, warts and all, written by someone well equipped to discuss the subject ("The Reckless Valor of Juan Antonio Ruiz," by Jonathan Kandell, Dec. 5). Kandell's description of Ruiz's disastrous week is quite a departure from the usual depiction of endless parties, luxury and glory--the romantic life of a matador. And the portrait of the sensitive Ruiz is not that of the matador as a sadistic monster, as painted by some opponents of bullfighting.
MAGAZINE
December 5, 1993 | Jonathan Kandell, Jonathan Kandell is a former European correspondent for the New York Times. His last article for this magazine was about Ecuador's Otavaleno Indians
SANTONA, A SLEEPY PORT ON THE CANTABRIAN COAST, IS the kind of place that Spain's bullfighting establishment embraces a few times a year to prove that despite big-city crowds and their million-dollar revenues, the national blood spectacle is still firmly rooted in the provinces. The town's belfries are bearded with storks' nests. The smell of fish drifts from the nets draped over the wharves.
NEWS
November 10, 1996 | ANDREW SELSKY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
While bulldozers rumble and city traffic crawls past, archeologist Esther Andreu steps into a pit and goes back centuries. A few feet down a ramp, Andreu walks past remnants of a 16th century royal palace, the first ever built in Madrid. A yard deeper, she is back 600 more years, stopping at the base of a watchtower put up by Arab soldiers.
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