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Juan Antonio Samaranch

NEWS
July 31, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a quiet morning at the International Olympic Committee, and the patriarch of world sports allows himself a wistful thought: If only he had retired after his crowning glory, the spectacular 1992 Summer Olympics in his hometown. "Retiring myself after the Barcelona Games, I could have been a hero, no?" asks IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch. Looking down momentarily, he thinks about what might have been, then adds: "I cannot regret. I have to write my history again."
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SPORTS
June 2, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what could turn out to be a defining moment of sports serving diplomacy, the International Olympic Committee has invited the two Koreas to march together behind the Olympic flag in the opening ceremony at September's Sydney Games. Typically reclusive North Korea has not issued a response to the notion, suggested in a May 25 letter from IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch to both countries.
SPORTS
May 24, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mario Vazquez Rana of Mexico, arguably the most influential figure in the Olympic movement in the Western hemisphere, Tuesday bowed out of the developing race to succeed IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch, who retires next year. Vazquez Rana, a wealthy industrialist who holds any number of titles within Olympic circles--president of Mexico's Olympic committee, president of the Assn. of National Olympic Committees, and so on--said he "obviously [has] the merits" to be IOC president.
SPORTS
April 23, 2000 | MIKE PENNER
Juan Antonio Samaranch likes his guns--his collection includes some of the finest souvenir firearms the Salt Lake City Olympic bid committee could send his way--but that was a saber the International Olympic Committee president rattled, ever dramatically, in the direction of Athens the other day. Four years from the 2004 Summer Games, Samaranch is less than pleased with Athens' organizational preparation. Construction on a variety of venues is behind schedule. More hotels have to be built.
SPORTS
April 21, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an extraordinary public scolding that raised the possibility of Athens losing the 2004 Summer Olympics, senior International Olympic Committee officials declared Thursday that Greece faces monumental problems and needs to make "drastic changes" to get ready for the Games.
SPORTS
February 1, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juan Antonio Samaranch, the Spanish president of the International Olympic Committee, met Monday in New York City for six hours with Department of Justice prosecutors and FBI agents. Samaranch, 79, was interviewed as a witness, not a target of the Justice Department's investigation into Salt Lake City's scandal-tainted winning bid for the 2002 Winter Games. Among the topics were the roles of key Salt Lake City organizers and some IOC delegates.
SPORTS
December 16, 1999 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first appearance by an International Olympic Committee president before Congress, Juan Antonio Samaranch turned in a virtuoso performance Wednesday that may ultimately be a turning point in public perception of the worst scandal in Olympic history. Cool and calm, he offered answers for every question lawmakers contentiously zinged his way--even as he asserted that a 50-point package of reforms the IOC endorsed last weekend has made it more open and accountable than ever before.
NEWS
December 13, 1999 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a drama that offered potent proof of Juan Antonio Samaranch's enduring strength atop the Olympic movement, the International Olympic Committee on Sunday fully endorsed a wide-ranging reform package aimed at restoring its credibility and prestige.
SPORTS
December 5, 1999 | STEPEHN WILSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It all began a year ago with the "B" word. Marc Hodler, a senior executive board member of the International Olympic Committee, was the first official to use "bribe" to describe the methods used by Salt Lake City to win the vote for the 2002 Winter Games. In November 1998, a Salt Lake television station obtained a leaked document disclosing that the city's Olympic bid team had set up a scholarship fund for the relatives of IOC members.
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