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Juan Asensio

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1999 | ANTONIO OLIVO
The night was a monster, baring its fangs, howling in sirens and the sound of mothers weeping as it spit out a mangled 8-year-old named Valerie onto Dr. Juan Asensio's operating table. She had been shot in the spleen, pancreas, diaphragm and left kidney while shielding a 1-year-old boy against gunfire that exploded outside her East Los Angeles home. Gang violence had ripped into its latest innocent victim.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1999 | ANTONIO OLIVO
The night was a monster, baring its fangs, howling in sirens and the sound of mothers weeping as it spit out a mangled 8-year-old named Valerie onto Dr. Juan Asensio's operating table. She had been shot in the spleen, pancreas, diaphragm and left kidney while shielding a 1-year-old boy against gunfire that exploded outside her East Los Angeles home. Gang violence had ripped into its latest innocent victim.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1998 | JOSEPH TREVINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Both new and veteran hospital staff members got a graphic introduction to the trauma of gang warfare Tuesday, viewing photos of patients who had been wounded and hearing from emergency room doctors. Doctors and staff at County-USC Medical Center deal with an average of seven gunshot victims a day, many of them the result of gang violence. Audience members listened intently with audible gasps and later expressed shock at the presentation. Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration on Tuesday authorized direct charter flights from Los Angeles and New York to Cuba, a step officials said will enhance "people to people" contacts without eroding Washington's four-decade-old economic embargo of the Communist-ruled island. Los Angeles International Airport and New York's John F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1995 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ninth-graders gasped at the first bloody image of a face partially blown away. After watching a few dozen more color slides of the bloody legacy of street violence--severed limbs, open wounds, punctured hearts--the images still seemed to shock the several hundred students. That was the plan. The two emergency room trauma surgeons, Dr. Edward E. Cornwell and Dr. Juan A. Asensio, were at Jefferson High School on Friday to shock.
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