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Juan B Sosa

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August 23, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Panamanian Embassy in Washington, which has been under the control of forces opposed to Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, will be closed next week until democracy is restored to Panama, it was announced Tuesday. Ambassador Juan B. Sosa, who has used the embassy as an anti-Noriega headquarters for the past 18 months, made the disclosure in an interview on the eve of a meeting of Organization of American States foreign ministers on Panama.
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NEWS
August 23, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Panamanian Embassy in Washington, which has been under the control of forces opposed to Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, will be closed next week until democracy is restored to Panama, it was announced Tuesday. Ambassador Juan B. Sosa, who has used the embassy as an anti-Noriega headquarters for the past 18 months, made the disclosure in an interview on the eve of a meeting of Organization of American States foreign ministers on Panama.
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NEWS
March 27, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
Panama's embassy here is a house divided--even subdivided--by the struggle for national leadership at home. Ambassador Juan B. Sosa, loyal to deposed President Eric A. Delvalle and recognized by the Reagan Administration, holds the keys to the building and has an office on the upper floor. He also controls the first-floor entry area, where a portrait of Delvalle is prominently displayed on the wall.
NEWS
March 27, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
Panama's embassy here is a house divided--even subdivided--by the struggle for national leadership at home. Ambassador Juan B. Sosa, loyal to deposed President Eric A. Delvalle and recognized by the Reagan Administration, holds the keys to the building and has an office on the upper floor. He also controls the first-floor entry area, where a portrait of Delvalle is prominently displayed on the wall.
NEWS
August 26, 1988
Panama strongman Manuel A. Noriega faces a "dramatic deterioration" of public support, Juan B. Sosa, Panama's ambassador to the United States and a Noriega foe, said in Washington. "Noriega's government is weaker by the day; the regime is fighting for its survival," Sosa said at a news conference. He cited a wave of strikes and demonstrations by high school students as signs that Gen. Noriega's support is slipping.
NEWS
August 29, 1988
Ousted Panamanian President Eric A. Delvalle slipped out of his hiding place in Panama City and flew in a U.S. Air Force jet to Miami for what a spokesman called a brief personal visit. Juan B. Sosa, ambassador to the United States under Delvalle, denied that Delvalle was fleeing Panama. The U.S. government still recognizes Delvalle as president despite his overthrow last February by the Panamanian strongman, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, whom Washington tried in vain to oust.
NEWS
March 10, 1988 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
The head of Panama's consulate in Los Angeles has broken with his country's military-dominated government and on Wednesday called for new leadership in his troubled nation. Santiago Torrijos, nephew of the late Panamanian leader Omar Torrijos, issued a letter "to the people of Panama" in which he said that Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's ruling party has subordinated the interests of the people to the "whims of a small political-military circle."
NEWS
May 16, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Searching for a way to remove Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega from power, the Reagan Administration has proposed that if Noriega steps down, his handpicked president could remain in office until elections in Panama next year, according to knowledgeable Panamanian sources. Juan B. Sosa, ambassador to Washington of the government of deposed Panamanian President Eric A.
NEWS
February 29, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
Faced with stubborn resistance from Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega, who faces federal indictments in Florida for drug trafficking, U.S. officials Sunday weighed economic options aimed at unseating him. "There isn't much in the inventory," said an Administration official knowledgeable about U.S. Latin American policy. "Economic pressure is all we've got." The official asked that he not be identified. However, another U.S.
NEWS
March 30, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration said Tuesday that there are "limits to our patience" with Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega, and a high-level spokesman for deposed President Eric A. Delvalle for the first time called for the removal of Noriega by force. At the White House, President Reagan convened a special National Security Council meeting Tuesday afternoon to discuss the situation in Panama. A spokesman said that the participants reviewed all the options for further U.S.
NEWS
May 25, 1988 | Associated Press
U.S. and Panamanian officials were reported on the verge of an agreement today that would lead to the departure from Panama of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega and the dismissal of federal drug-smuggling indictments against him. Administration officials said both sides are preparing formal statements announcing that an agreement has been reached but they stressed that no deal can be considered final until Noriega announces it publicly.
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